James Weaver

James Weaver

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James Weaver

James Weaver wrote a review of on February 13, 2013

Great little tent
5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I purchased this tent on clearance for a very friendly price last year and have used it in the Grand Canyon and the Smoky Mountains. It holds up well to high winds, rain, rocky campsites, etc. My only complaint is that the vestibule is too small for all my gear. The tent itself is very roomy and lightweight, and I love the freestanding design. Materials seem good so far, though the door zipper is a bit flimsy.

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James Weaver

James Weaver wrote a review of on June 20, 2010

5 5

This is a great stove! It packs incredibly small, weighs nothing, and burns hot. At 9000', I boiled 2 cups of water in 2-3 mins, and cooked a full box of mac in another 8. The only issues I have with the GigaPower are: 1) No windscreen included. A windscreen would be very helpful, and the available SP windscreen is bulky and heavy. 2) It can be a little difficult to simmer -- either the flame goes out or my 700ml mug boils over.

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James Weaver

James Weaver wrote a review of on June 20, 2010

2 5

I bought this pack as a daypack/light overnighter for situations where my Baltoro 70 was overkill. Having tried the Variant 52 in store, I figured the 28 would have a similar fit and suspension. As it turns out, the 28 is basically a frameless pack. A foam backpanel provides practically no support -- unloaded, the panel will flex if I stand the pack up against a wall. Fully loaded, the backpanel becomes more supportive, but I typically remove gear as I hike; whether it be drinking the water in my hydration bladder, eating the food I brought along, or removing camera gear for scenic portions. At this point, the panel develops a V-shaped crease at mid-back, which leads to pain over long distances.

Pros: I love the toploading design, the rugged fabric and the supportive waistbelt.

From what I've seen, both the Stratos and Talon series packs have better suspensions, at the expense of "abuseability." I'll likely switch to one of these packs.

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James Weaver

James Weaver wrote a review of on April 5, 2010

4 5

Honestly, this pack is just too large for the typical gear loads a 60L pack can accommodate. Unless you tend to pack very light, yet bulky items, the Exos 46 is a better choice. For loads over 35lbs, the Variant 52, Atmos 65, or Aether 60 are preferable.

Pros:
--Ultralight, with all the features of heavier packs
--Excellent back panel ventilation
--Comfortable for light loads

Cons:
--External "sleeping pad" straps do not unclasp, do not appear durable, and provide a tight fit for ridge rest and other foam pads.
--Hip belt could be sturdier

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James Weaver

James Weaver wrote a review of on April 5, 2010

4 5

I ended up returning this bag because I needed something more suitable for true 3-season use; however, it is definitely a solid choice for late spring through early fall backpacking.

Pros:
--Lightweight, especially for a synthetic and for the price.
--Very compressible, includes a compression sack.
--Zippers are not overly prone to snagging.
--Regular size fits me (at 6') much better than typical regular size bags.

Cons:
--Unsuitable for temperatures below 40 degrees without heavyweight base layers.

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