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James Howard

James Howard

Wherever the wind takes me.. which as of now is simply Red River Gorge, but most recently, the Pacific Crest Trail. I'll be back.

Jim's Passions

Road Running
Camping
Backpacking
Hiking
Yoga
Sport Climbing

Jim's Bio

James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on April 16, 2014

Alright, so this one stumped me...for about...

Alright, so this one stumped me...for about 4 minutes. TLD didn't actually have any sizing charts themselves, so then I finally realized I should go to Shock Doctor's website, and lo and behold, there was a sizing chart. Since the support is clearly branded with a Shock Doctor logo, on top of the fact that the chart was located on this webpage (https://www.shockdoctor.com/ultra-wrap-lace-ankle-support), I don't know what the deal is with the TLD-name branding.
Anyways, to determine your correct size, be sure to follow the appropriate measuring procedure as delineated in the chart I've attached.
Hope this helps!

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on April 14, 2014

Wayne hit the answer to your question, spot-on. One more thing to note explicitly is that Montbell clothing tends to run a bit on the smaller side, so if you do ultimately determine your measurements with the help of a friend, make sure you check that you are comfortably in the range of a size of your choosing. If you are right on the fence between a L and an XL, I would go XL without trepidation. For instance, I have the Alpine Light Down Parka by Montbell, this model but with an attached hood. Normally in essentially any clothing style and brand, I wear a S (or perhaps an XS), but with that particular Parka I ordered a Medium and it ended up fitting me like a glove.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on April 13, 2014

I suppose it would depend on how long you plan on being out. If it was a five or six day adventure, sure, perhaps. However, you have to account for the size of the bottle that you would have to continue to lug around until you got back to town before you could ditch it (remember LNT principles!). That would be an awfully big item to tote around for days on end after you finished it, not to mention, liquid is heavy as it is. I think there are better alternative around that could provide you with similar, if not identical, benefits at a fraction of the weight.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on April 13, 2014

I found and provided a link (http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=53381) that will enlighten you on the subject a bit, but I just wanted you to have a few more perspectives to confirm my assertion that there are no backpacking filters on the market as of now that will actually filter out heavy metals (i.e. mercury, arsenic, etc.). I know many filters, if not all, esp. in the case of Katadyn, come with a sticker when purchasing the filter warning against use in areas where there is a likelihood or confirmation of heavy metal presence. I know that carbon-based filters can assist in the reduction of heavy metal presence should it wind up in the water you gather to filter, but no filter can completely eliminate the risk. However, there is hope: so long as you are skimming off the top of a body of water, you should be able to avoid the metal entirely, or at least minimize the risk to the degree that you won't suffer any prolonged or serious consequences. Ultimately, it comes down to finding sources you know are not tainted and/or generally being smart about how you gather your water. Just remember heavy metals tend to sink, so never gather from regions near the very bottom of the water source.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on April 13, 2014

I would take a quick measurement of the pack's dimensions with everything you plan on having in it while using the Airporter. However, with the daypack detached, I would think a Small would be sufficient. Always verify by measuring before purchasing though; BC makes returns and exchanges ultra-simple and about as streamlined as the process can be, but it is still a hassle.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on April 12, 2014

The Medium size measurements for this...

The Medium size measurements for this jacket are as follows:
Chest: 38 - 39in
Sleeve Length: 34 - 35in
Waist: 32 - 34in
Inseam: 30 -32in
Outseam: 40 - 42in
Total Length: ~32in (based off what I found on http://www.6pm.com/volcom-snow-l-gore-tex-jacket-black & http://www.evo.com/shell-jackets/volcom-l-gore-tex-jacket.aspx#image=69695/340835/volcom-l-gore-tex-jacket-blue.jpg).
I'll attach a sizing chart that I found, and I presume the numbers directly beneath the alphabetical size representations are the numerical lengths of the men's tops (i.e. the "length" measurement you wanted)

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on April 12, 2014

While I cannot tell you a date, I would think that the rope is still perfectly fine to use. I believe that if the rope had truly been sitting for an abnormally extended period of time, BC would have removed it from their product listing as they would be putting themselves at risk for a lawsuit if they sold defective climbing gear that could potentially lead to a death. I believe they have it on such a huge sale due to the fact that they may be trying to get rid of it to prepare for new merchandise to roll in to their warehouses from perhaps Beal themselves.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on March 28, 2014

There's no reason that it shouldn't work, though I have heard extremely contrasting reviews concerning the TX.Direct Wash-In waterproofing; however, be sure to check on CG's website for instructions on how to clean your down garment. Most manufacturers of down-filled clothing tend to, with minor deviation, agree on a set of protocols when washing and drying your garment to ensure prolonged use, capability, and fortitude of the piece in question. I've avoided using the wash-in waterproofing due to degree of disparity of opinion I've found, but the Tech Wash shouldn't be a problem. Make sure you find out the exact procedure for cleaning the parka though!

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on March 24, 2014

The interior pocket seems to be suitable for carrying naught but a laptop, although I must say it doesn't look like you would be able to carry many photos inside the organizer pocket, so if you were planning on carrying many books, you would probably have to capitulate and throw a book or two in with the laptop. Check out the photos I posted above for a bit of detail.
Hope that helps.

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0 Comments

0 Comments

James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on March 24, 2014

I am sorry to inform you that there are no side-holster water bottle receptacles on this particular model of TNF backpack. However, check out the above photos I'm about to post that I found on www.openair.com. They are the Interior pocket and the organizer pocket, best I could manage.
Hope they help, sorry no one ever got around to answering this until now.

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