James Howard

James Howard

Wherever the wind takes me.. which as of now is simply Red River Gorge, but most recently, the Pacific Crest Trail. I'll be back.

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Jim's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Yoga
Climbing

Jim's Bio

James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on September 10, 2014

Hey Noah,

I think that the picture representing the Black/Citro color scheme on these pants is merely shown in their unworn appearance, without a person or plastic model cast being contained within the pant, if you understand what I mean. I think the Black/Flame color has a representation of what they are meant to do and how they should look when a user wears them, but the B/C color shows them without them being "on" anything.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on September 6, 2014

Here is the answer from user "Thorishere" on Arc'teryx's website(http://www.arcteryx.com/product.aspx?language=EN&gender=mens&category=Accessories&subcat=Gloves&model=Beta-AR-Glove), comparing the Beta ARs and the Alpha SVs (check my answer on those, by the way):
"A) The Beta's cuff is significantly smaller/shorter than the SV and don't go over the cuffs of my Alpha SV jacket as well.

B) The Beta AR feels a lot less substantial than the Alpha SV.

C) The Beta's do not have an adjustable wrist strap, which imo is a good thing because I find the wrist adjustment on my Alpha SV gloves really annoying.

D) The Beta's does not have leather covering the back of the fingers whereas the Alpha SV's do.

E) The Beta AR and Alpha SV gloves seem to share the same inner fleece lining."

That user seemed to do a pretty comprehensive comparison, or as thorough as I can find, but Wayne already somewhat told you the way of it - there is no particular method of determining a temperature range for gloves.

Hope this helps

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on September 6, 2014

It appears, from the reviews on the Arc'teryx website, that people have pretty mixed reviews concerning these gloves, but a general consensus is that they aren't particularly warm. For instance, one person said that they were "flexible, well built but cold."
People discuss usage in temperature ranges, asserting a number of opinions, but overall, the impression that you end up with is that they would perform decently in temps as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit (~ -12 degrees Celsius), but one person stated that conditions colder than 25 degrees Fahrenheit result in chilly hands for the user. Another gentleman, while discussing his summit trip of Mt. Rainier, says that "[a]bove 13,000' with 20-30mph winds, snow and temps well below freezing my hands did get chilled," but goes on to say that these are intended more for backcountry outings than expedition-status trips.
These are meant, as one member of the Arc'teryx staff states in an answer to the user, "for cold and wet conditions where you need ultimate dexterity. If you are looking for a glove for really cold temperatures, the Zenta AR gloves are going to be warmer."
In summation, these would probably be good if you don't intend on facing prolonged temperatures in the single digits or teens (brief periods of exposure and endurance, probably, but nothing extended). However, if you expect to encounter excessively gelid situations where you need maximum warmth, these may not be ideal.

Hope this helps! Also, check out the Zenta ARs if warmth is your goal.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on September 6, 2014

Hey Art B.,

I know this isn't much help, but KUHL doesn't even provide instructions on their website aside from the following snippet: "EL�XUR? fabric is easy care, wash and wear, soft to the touch, and fights odor with Ionik? Technology: negatively charged silver ion threads in the fabric fight odor causing bacteria."
Based on that information, I would have to presume that the care of this shirt is nothing remotely tedious, and probably just a cool or cold water wash following by a low-to-medium dry cycle, or hanging if you prefer - they don't list whether or not their fabrics come pre-shrunk, unfortunately.
Sorry I couldn't be more help.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on August 11, 2014

Possibly, but I wouldn't recommend it.
Not only would you risk getting a bit wet (or sopping) if you took a spill, or even just accumulated powder from shredding the mountain gnar, but I would seriously worry about ripping this puppy open in some form or fashion just from a nasty fall, or going through brush, or hitting a tough tree limb...
Short answer: it's totally possible, but it's not a route I would advise.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on August 11, 2014

Are you comparing products from BC versus Icebreaker's actual website? I notice that there isn't anything on BC labeled with the prim "Oasis" alone, whereas on IB's official site, there is. However, I'm pretty certain you answered your own question: as far as I can tell, the only different is the labeling of the actual product itself.
As far as construction and performance, I think it's the same stuff. By the way, having purchased and used IB myself, I would jump at it if you get the opportunity. They do base layers splendidly.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 12, 2014

This bag does not have a sleeping pad sleeve, unfortunately; however, it does have a "stash pocket" located on the chest region on the interior section (see second picture of partially unzipped bag http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/shop/product_Marmot-Trestles-15F-Sleeping-Bag_10184995_10208_10000001_-1_) of the bag.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 12, 2014

I believe BC simply listed it improperly; on REI, they are a bit more concise about what the pot specifications are. For instance, they list the liquid capacity as being 1.4 L ( or 48 fluid ounces), but the dimensions they list as the same. However, one thing that they clarify on REI is that what this set comes with is a 2-liter pot, titanium lid, and a plastic sealing lid. Basically, I think technically it is a 2-liter pot, but it's only meant to hold up to 1.4 L of food/liquid at a given time. If you check out this link (http://www.rei.com/product/831568/snow-peak-titanium-cook-n-save-pot#specsTab), scroll over the picture they provide and it will auto-magnify; whilst doing that, observe the measurement indicators pressed into the metal sidewall of the pot; you will notice that the measurements end well below the rim of the pot, which is why both specs are technically right, but to definitively answer, the pot is only meant to cook up to 1.4 L of anything at a given time.
Hope that helps!

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 12, 2014

From that description, it sounds as though the wiring connections are probably loose or, more likely, disconnected. You are correct in assuming that the lamp SHOULD be on once you've made it switch on the indicator light from a flashing blue (Lock) to solid green (On, with high battery level). As you stated before, and as I know from experience, BC has a fantastic return policy, so I would just send it back their way and request an exchange.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 11, 2014

Honestly, it sounds as though you got a lemon. So you're saying that it won't come out of "Lock" mode? For instance, you operated it and it worked, you put it in Lock mode, and then when you held down the "On" button for a number of seconds to bring it out of Lock mode to turn it on, it wouldn't turn on? The flashing blue should be there for five or six seconds before it comes out of Lock mode to turn on, but if all it is doing is flashing blue even when you're holding it down for over ten or fifteen seconds, maybe you got at a lemon. Very bizarre.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 11, 2014

Unless I'm mistaken, I think that's exactly what it is. If you're looking for something primarily for summer use, I would imagine this would be suitable, but make sure to check the fabric. According to Airhole's website, they offer their Airhole models in a number of different fabrics (i.e. Polar Fleece; Merino Wool; Featherlight; Bamboo blend), but DryTech doesn't seem to be one of them. Moreover, I also notice that their Camo version (see: http://airholefacemasks.com/portfolio/camo-3/) is different than the one listed here on BC, so I don't know if this is a variation made solely for distribution by BC or what. It lists the recommended use as being for snowboarding / skiing activities, but others before you have said they have used it in the summer with no problems, so I think you should be good.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 5, 2014

According to the REI website (http://www...

According to the REI website (http://www.rei.com/product/864138/mountain-hardwear-optic-25-tent#specsTab), it's packed size is 7 x 23 inches; I don't know how much smaller than that you can get it when it isn't sacked up in it's factory stuff sack, but I've included a picture of a Medium-sized one of these, with a regular size Nalgene bottle for a scale reference, since nearly everyone has one of those. As you can see from the pic, the medium is pretty freaking large, so depending on how closely you can get it packed to Nalgene size, I would go with the size closest to that.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 3, 2014

Typically, airlines restrict carry-on baggage to maximum linear measurement of 45 total inches. This one, according to the listed specs, tallies up to 47.5, but honestly, I think they would harangue you for a couple extra inches. The 90L, though, would probably be required to check, as that is substantially larger than this model.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 3, 2014

The volume of the larger cookpot (5.5" x 2 1/4") is 26 oz; for the smaller cookpot (5" x 2 1/8"), the volume is listed as 18 oz; unfortunately, I cannot locate any total volume measurement for the frying pan (however, the diameter of the pan itself is 5 3/4" by likely something like 1/2" - 3/4", going off an educated guess), but don't look at the pictures and think you'll be able to Wolfgang Puck out of it. Depending on your heat source, it might be good for heating up pre-hydrated food or cooking an egg or two, something along those lines.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 3, 2014

It depends on the size.. If you are referring to the 12 cup model, the weight is listed as 2 lbs, 1 oz; if you are referring to the 14 cup model, the weight is listed as 2 lbs, 2 oz; and if you are referring to the 8 cup model, the weight is listed as 30.4 oz (~ 1.9 lbs) but that model doesn't seem to have the siliconized handle like the 12 and 14 cup models.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 3, 2014

Given that the dimensions of the bag in question are 28 x 13 x 13 inches, and most airlines have a restriction of 45 linear inches for carry-on baggage, I would say they would probably oppose you taking this on to try and stuff into an overhead compartment. While I would have to guess the dimensions of overhead compartment bins vary slightly from airline to airline, I would assume that they would be pretty stringent about sticking to their listing allowance for bag dimensions involving carry-ons.
Regarding the 60L model, I would check the measurement specs; if they are, linearly, 45 - 46 inches, I would say you're fine to take in aboard.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on July 3, 2014

This is definitely a tough call, considering you're right at the edge of being in between the Small and Medium size ranges listed for Patagonia. However, if you're only going to wear this with a t-shirt base, I would probably lean towards a size Small. My measurements are 38.5 chest, 30 waist, 33 sleeve, and a 15 neck (if we're talking dress shirt status on that particular measurement but it says the neck range is a 15 - 15.5in so I think you should be good on that account), and I would probably lean towards the small myself just because I like my stuff to actually fit my form instead of hanging off my body like a dress.
Do you need this soon, or will you have time to return for an alternative size should you order and come to find you wanted something different? If there's no time crunch, I would order one size, try it, and if you don't like it return for an exchange.
I know that is kind of the argument you're probably having in your head, but I think you'll be happy with a Small.
Hope this helps.

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James Howard

James Howard wrote an answer about on June 24, 2014

Unfortunately, I cannot seem to find an actual quantitative measurement for specific lengths; the only thing that seems to pop-up is the equivocal "hip-length" statement, and even then, I'm only finding info pertaining to the mens' and womens' versions of this jacket.
However, I would say that if the cut is like that of the larger, adult versions of the jacket, it would likely be the same for smaller versions, such as the kids'.
Regarding temperature range, I would think you would be safe to say that with a thin layer or two on underneath, you could comfortably ensure your young lass would be fine down to the lower 30s (Fahrenheit, that is).
Hope this helps, but perhaps someone will follow behind and provide a bit more info concerning the actual measurement of the length.

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