Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman

Aspen/Snowmass, Colorado, Utah, Whistler B.C., Chamonix, France, and other great resorts in U.S. with deep pow! During the summer, its hike and bike!

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on September 5, 2010

It depends on what lenses you get. For snowy/stormy conditions I have the High Intensity Persimmon lenses and find they work really well. I highly suggest them for those types of conditions or even all around conditions excluding really bright light. I have also heard good things about High Intensity Yellow lenses for snowy/flat light conditions

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on August 31, 2010

I skied the Kung Fujas a couple of days last season. I really enjoyed them. I actually didn't ski park the two days a demoed them and I skied them in a longer size than what you are looking into, but I really liked it as an all mountain ski for all sorts of different conditions.

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on August 31, 2010

When it comes to skis that incorporate some sort of rocker technology you should choose a longer ski because it will ski shorter. If you do ski aggressively and enjoy fast speeds and will be skiing a lot of powder with this ski then I would definitely go with the 186. If you are a skier that does a lot of tight and quick turns in their skiing you might want to go with the 178, but I think the 186 would still be manageable. Hope this helps.

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote a question about on August 24, 2010

So how will this ski do on hardpack snow or groomers? Clearly this ski is going to be lots of fun in pow and soft snow conditions, but how versitile is it in other conditions and various terrain other than powder?

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote a review of on August 13, 2010

5 5

The Oakley Jupiter sunglasses work really well and have typical Oakley style. Like all Oakley products the Jupiters are high performance. The lenses as well as the frame are durable and are clearly well made. In my opinion, these sunglasses will have the best fit on someone who does not to have too large of a face. The design closely resembles the Oakley Frogskins. I have them in polished black with the black iridium lenses and I do not have one complaint. Oakley continues to impress me with their products.

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on May 31, 2010

As you said you are a tall guy at 6 foot 4. You could go with 191 because although that would generally be considered a lot of ski you are tall enough to handle it. In fact, you would be a little taller than the 191's so I think they would suit you fine. I think that for a guy your height the 184's might feel short. Again, given your height, with the 191's you would have good stability at speeds, nice float in powder, and still be able to make quick, tight turns. Hope this helps!

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on April 21, 2010

I also have a Giro G10 and use the Crowbars for my goggles. For me, I don't really have any goggle gap or maybe a minor amount which is barely recognizable. The Crowbars are awesome goggles and fit well the the G10 helmet.

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on April 12, 2010

Personally, I really like the HI intensity persimmon. It is very versatile in a variety of conditions. It is a really great lens in pretty much all possible conditions except for really sunny days in which case you might want something like fire iridium. Foggy days, cloudy days, days with heavy snowfall, and some fairly sunny days the HI persimmon is great for it all. Also the crowbar never seems to fog up; its a great goggle.

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on April 10, 2010

At your height which is pretty much 6 feet 2 inches, the size you get depends on how you ski. If you do a large amount tight turns when you ski (for example bumps or tight trees) you might want to go with the 177cm. At that size, because of your height, you may loose some stability at speed. If you don't mind a bit of a longer ski when in tight turn situations and don't want to sacrifice stability when doing fast especially on high speed groomers and on-piste then go 184 which is the next size up.

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote an answer about on April 9, 2010

The S7's are much wider at 115mm underfoot. The tip and tail dimensions are wider as well. It is also a rockered ski in the tip and tail. Because of the rocker and the wider width than the S5, the S7 will be a much better powder ski/big mountain ski. The S5 is more of all mountain jib ski. I have not skied the S5's but I loved the S7. They are awesome in powder but were also versatile in conditions that didn't always include fresh snow (for example, hardpack/groomers). You should definitely try the S7 on a powder day or just about any day skiing out west.

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Jacob Frackman

Jacob Frackman wrote a review of on March 31, 2010

5 5

This ski performed well and was fun in all conditions, from carving fast turns on open groomers to bumps to powder. With a fairly wide 101mm waist and tip rocker the ski is fun and nimble in pow. The rocker also helps in almost all other conditions. It is quick and responsive as well, which is why it is also good fun in bumps and trees. You can also carve nice turns at fast speeds with the Shogun as well. Although these skis are decent in moderate amounts of powder, if you have a really deep day you will probably want something wider and with more rocker. As an all mountain ski the Shoguns are one of the best skis I've skied all season.

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