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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik

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Camping

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote a question about on November 10, 2011

Wondering about the insulation. This website says Primaloft Eco (which, I believe, was true last year; and the year before it was Primaloft one, I think). But I think that this year it's Thermicmicro. Can anyone confirm?
Also, mine came without a stuff sack (I bought it in a store). Can someone confirm having actually bought this and it coming with a stuff sack? Thanks.

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote an answer about on November 10, 2011

I completely agree with Jon Webb.

The compressor jacket has all the benefits of synthetic insulation. If you're layering for a higher-intensity activity where it is cold enough to warrant such insulation, the synthetic may do a better job with the moisture (dissipation/insulation/drying). (Disclaimer: I don't own the compressor jacket. I do have the pants.)

As for the nitrous (which I do have), what it does is deliver incredible heat-to-weight and heat-to-packed-space ratios to keep you warm. It's made of the highest quality down at the highest fill power, but it packs to almost nothing (it packs into its own pocket, and you can tighten that even smaller with rubber bands if you want). It's truly a very high-end, high-quality piece of equipment worthy of the MHW name. Since its so small and light, I bring it with me everywhere in the winter. It's pretty much part of my back pack (just like my rain jacket is during the summer). Whenever I find myself too cold, I can pull this layer out and it fixes the problem. I've also been real popular for having this to lend to others who dressed too lightly for a winter adventure.
Not to sound too "promotional" but the Nitrous is awesome. I love it.

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote a review of on August 5, 2010

3 5

You gotta be very serious about weight saving to get this system. I am, and no regrets, but it sure would be nice to have the non-stick finish of the Quick 2 set.
A second pot isn't usually useful (and in fact, it might be possible to buy it separately and fit it in here, not sure) and if you remove it from the quick 2 set, the mass difference is marginal.
Other than that, a terrific set, though. The strainer lid is useful.
I wonder if the cups could have been lighter. When immersed (e.g. to wash), water gets between the insulator (not removable) and the metal cup, which makes me worried as to the long term effect of water there. Time will tell.

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote an answer about on July 26, 2010

Follow-up: Very little. I don't have a scientific scale, but this weights almost nothing, and is an absolute must if you want to use the tent fly as a shelter. It'll also protect the bottom of your tent (foot print can be replaced for cheaper than the tent!)

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote an answer about on July 26, 2010

Just a follow-up to my own question now that I bought the tent. And thanks Jason for a very accurate reply. Your response helped me make up my mind about buying this tent.
As Jason mentioned, it's not easy to take down the tent from the inside-out (fly last), and it is wholly impossible without a footprint. I did find, after some experimenting, a procedure that works well enough and does not require exiting the tent at all.
0) To begin with, when setting up the ten, you must attach the velcro tabs underneath the fly to the poles. This is usually optional, to center the fly, but the fly won’t hold up on its own once you remove the tent if you don’t. You should also have both the four tent corners and the four footprint corners staked out (can use the same stakes).
To take the tent down in the rain:
1) Put on your rain jacket. Your’ back will be rubbing against the fly and it’ll get wet.
2) Through the front door, remove pull the outer fly grommet out of the short cross-pole (a thumb-sized strap loop is provided exactly for that), and pull the tent grommet out as well. The tent and fly shouldn’t collapse at this if everything else is still staked in, but don’t delay: put the fly grommet back in without the tent’s.
3) Step into the vestibule (your back is now rubbing the fly). Pick an adjacent corner. From the inside, unclip the fly from the tent, and clip it into the footprint. They may not be at the same distance, but the clip on the fly is adjustable, so they don’t need to be.
4) The stake is holding both the footprint and the tent. Leave it in the ground and slip the tent wire out of the stake from above (this works regardless of whether the tent wire is above or below the footprint’s).
5) Do the same of the other corner that is accessible from the vestibule.
The vestibule-side of the tent is now collapsing a bit. Close the tent door and unclip the tent from the long pole.
6) Take the long pole out of the side grommets of the tent, and let it rest on the ground. It should hold fine, although go easy on the fly from now on as it has a bit less stability.
6) Repeat the procedure for unclipping the corner (steps 4-5) for one of the remaining corners.
7) Repeat the procedure for removing the tent grommet (step 2) for the grommet on the far side of the short cross pole.
8) Repeat the procedure for unclipping the corner (steps 4-5) for the last remaining corner.
9) Roll up your dry tent and put it in a waterproof/dry place. Your wet fly can go in a separate bag.
Ta-da. Your tent, still dry, is packed and you’re under the shelter. You can go on with your hike, knowing that you don’t need to sleep in a wet tent tonight.

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote a review of on June 16, 2010

4 5

Overall a good pair of pants. So far completely water proof. Here's what else I found:
-Tiny when packed into pocket.
-Long enough. I take small because of my waist size (30), but I'm not short (5'11). Thankfully these were long enough.
-The bottom cuff is too wide for my taste. They are almost flared out at the ankles. There's a tightening velcro, but even at the max, they are nowhere near tight around my ankles (something I would like, when walking through wet grass/fields/bush). I guess that could be fixed by adding a patch of velcro further along the periphery of the ankle hole.

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote a review of on June 16, 2010

4 5

Just got these. Here's what I can say so far:
-Get them 0.5 size (US) larger than your usual size.
-They get pretty hot, but tolerably so.
-Gore-tex membrane.
-They ride a little high. I occasionally find shoes that rise up and hit my malleolus (that bony bump on either side of your ankles). These ones do that to me. This probably has more to do with my own foot dimensions, so if you never tried on a shoe that hits your malleolus I wouldn't worry about this.

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote a question about on April 9, 2010

Hi. I'm still wondering whether it is more waterproof than the Naos...

I'm looking for a whitewater drybag / hiking pack combo.

Right now, I paddle with a 115L seal line pro drybag and I have an 80L Bora for the winter. Both are too big for many trips and I'd like a solution that'll be both my summer hiking bag and my dry bag. I basically would like a hiking back that withstands my occasional (getting rarer) swims in rapids and keep 100% dry (it's cold at night in the spring up here).

Am I looking at the wrong bags? Or could one of the Naos or Arrakis do?

Thanks in advance!!!

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote a question about on April 8, 2010

I need a new stove, and although it isn't winter, I want one that works up here (Quebec) when I camp in the winter (commonly -15C).
My last stove was white gas and worked like a beauty. Can I safely assume that all white gas stove will do under these conditions? Or is there some reason I need the bulkier XGK-EX?

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote a question about on April 7, 2010

Can the outer fly hold up on the poles without the tent?

Can you use the outer fly and poles (without internal tent) as an ultra light shelter?

Can you pack up the tent in the rain (unclip it from the pole) under the cover of the fly while the fly remains standing?

Normally you can do this with clip-on tents (tents don't have sleeves for the poles, but rather clips, like this one), but being that this tent is not freestanding, I'm not sure how this would work. What exactly needs to be pegged for the tent to stay up?

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JY Pikulik

JY Pikulik wrote an answer about on April 6, 2010

Yes, Thank you very much!
I guess the bottom line I'll take-home from this is that the EV2 is waterproof enough to be a summer tent, but a bit heavier and a bit less airy than a summer tent can be? Let me know if I misunderstood you.

My situation: I will needs a winter tent next year, but I also need to replace my summer tent, and I don't think I can afford two tents. Is there another solution you might recommend?

Thanks again to you and all other contributors here.

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