Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi

NYC, and anywhere adventure takes me

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Ian 's Passions

Backpacking
Hiking

Ian 's Bio

Completed the Appalachian Trail on June 6th, 2009 after 4 months and 5 days of being out on the trail and putting my gear to the test.

Go to http://irmAppalachianTrail.Blogspot.com to find out more about my trip

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote an answer about on August 20, 2009

there are two parts to the inflatable...

there are two parts to the inflatable beams:

The outer layer is used as a protective layer to prevent any damage to the inner beam which is actually being inflated. This layer is made from sailcloth. The inner bladder (which is actually getting blown up) is made out of polyurethane.

I went over 1,200 miles straight with the morpho without any issues. The beams worked great every night.

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote an answer about on August 10, 2009

It will work great as a backcountry skiing jacket. The material is durable and will hold up to any scrapes by branches. The only downside is it doesn't have a snow shield around the waste like most ski jackets. If you can live without that though, it'll work great

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote a review of on June 26, 2009

2 5

So I've had this for a while, and I really do love it. It's comfortable and light. However, I'm not sure if it's just because it's all air, but the past few nights I've used it, I wake up with my butt touching the ground -- the air just doesn't stay in all night. Whether its the air pressure or a leak, I have had it replaced already, and it is still happening. It's a shame, but oh well.

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote a review of on June 19, 2009

5 5

I've used all types of socks, and these are by far the best. The short ones are more of my day by day use socks, and they are great. My full height ones lasted over 1,000 miles and are still working great. Most comfortable socks ever, and its great to pay $12 for a pair socks I will be able to replace whenever they start to wear out.

Keep in mind, smartwool has a lifetime guarantee, so if they ever do start to wear thin, they will replace them for free.

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote a review of on June 19, 2009

5 5

these are great to have on extended trips. If you wear these inside of your regular smartwools, you won't get as much sweat and grime on the full sized pair making them last longer without washing. With the liners, you can wash them in a stream and they will dry much faster than the regular socks.

Not only that, but the black ones make great dress socks as well.

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote an answer about on June 19, 2009

My buddy and I used these montbell jackets for 125 days on a thru-hike going through 3 seasons, snow, rain, etc. I agree with the others, if you go bushwacking with it, it'll get torn up. However, minor dings and scrapes won't rip it. Neither of us had any type of issue with holes. The entire line is great, and more durable than you would think as long as you're not stupid about it.

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote a review of on June 18, 2009

3 5

I tried to use this to keep juice in my phone on my Appalachian Trail thru-hike, and never once got a charge. The only way it will get a charge is if it sits in the sun, without moving, all day. I clipped it to my pack, rigged it so that it would sit on top, and tried 5 other positions to get it to charge while hiking, but I was just ducking under trees too much for the sun to actually hit it enough to charge. Left it on my pack for 2 weeks before I sent it home, and never more than 20% charged. It was a shame, I really wanted it to work.

However, if you go camping, you can just leave it at your campsite to charge while you venture through the woods or mountains so you have power when you get back.

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Ian Mangiardi

Ian Mangiardi wrote an answer about on June 18, 2009

You need the correct adjustments to prevent the swing on the pack. To slim it down, make sure the compression straps are pulled tightly on the sides. This will keep the center of gravity closer to your back. To get a tight feel, the two straps which are on your shoulders should be pulled tightly. What that will do will pull the top part of the pack towards your shoulders creating a snug fit.

As for the camelback, I used the baltoro for a 125 day thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail without any problems with the hydration port. What I did for the tube was just got a clip and clipped it to my chest strap.

hope this helps!

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