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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea

Colorado, Wherever My Story Takes Me

Hunter's Passions

Backpacking
Sport Climbing

Hunter's Bio

Life is about taking risks, falling down and getting up again, no matter what. It's about shared experiences, being passionate about what you do, and following your dreams no matter where they take you. I want to bring this philosophy with me wherever I go, whatever I do, and share it with you, because we all fall--maybe you have already--and the question is whether or not you'll have the courage to get back up, knowing you'll fall again.


It also helps to have an attentive belayer.

Happy trails, and good luck!

0 Comments

Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote a review of on March 6, 2013

Still Going, 4 years later...
5 5

My brother got this jacket for me in fall 2009, I have worn it absolutely every season, and every time I go out without it, I wish I had it. It is coffee-stained, a little wrinkled, well-loved, and still my go-to for winter weather. I'll admit, I have tried on warmer jackets, but I've never NEEDED anything warmer than this; throw a waterproof shell overtop in extreme conditions and you're set for whatever might come. It moves well, it packs well, it does it's job, and I've only lost maybe a tiny handful of stuffing in 4 years.

The hood might be my favorite extreme -cold feature, fitting over a helmet, hugging my face comfortably and being easy to adjust.

This isn't an extremely durable piece (see: lightweight), but it's held up to a few intense bush-wacking sessions, a few solid ski runs through forested terrain, and been squashed and snagged on 4 years-worth of gear ranging from casual hiker to vertical mountaineering.

When this jacket finally gives in to all the crap I've put it through, I'll probably be shopping for the same one!

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0 Comments

Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on January 7, 2012

No, not too thin for an ATC (though it will make your heart pound the first couple times you use it). With any purchase, I'd say to test the gear out at home before you go outside with it so there aren't any surprises when you really need it. On that note, I don't use my 9.5 as much because I'm climbing mostly on sharp granite on moderate trad routes, which leads to a lot of abrasion. I'm happier with my 9.8 or even a 10.2, especially if it's getting used A LOT. Save this guy for redpointing and hard sport routes!

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on January 7, 2012

Zach,

In terms of size, this pack would probably do quite well, being in the over 5000 cu in category. You could (but probably should not) go smaller depending on how often you plan to re-supply and how much you're willing to give up in exchange for weight savings. Do you have any specific concerns?

PS if you're traveling with a partner, you can share group gear and save on overall weight.

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on November 9, 2011

Bow,

The Gore-tex pro shell is a slightly textured nylon hardshell material. It feels more like a rain jacket, but not the super slippery variety you often find. It is not a soft shell, but it breathes pretty darn well and is bomb-proof. I find it to be more 'stiff' when folded while still moving and breathing nicely during high-output activities like ice climbing.

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on October 19, 2011

Russell,

Most Kelty backpacks have a pouch in the main pocket for your hydration bladder. This will be on the inner wall of the backpack closest to your body while you're wearing it (water is heavy, and heavy objects are better packed closer to your center of mass). When you pack your bladder, the tube should be on the bottom so it will always be covered in water and you won't be sucking air when you're exhausted and thirsty.

The "snake" is a little harder to find. It's usually a little hole about where your neck should be between that pocket and the outside of the pack, and may be labeled with a little "H2O" or a water droplet. You can sometimes find it offset to one side towards the top seam of the main pocket. My advice, feel around for it until your finger goes through something. It's often covered by a water-resistant top material.

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on September 1, 2011

hon,

I just got the laceup version of this shoe and ordered my street size (8.5). The shoe as adjusted so that your normal street size will perform aggressively as a climbing shoe, therefor: order a 9 or 9.5. The synthetic upper won't stretch much... at all.

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on August 23, 2011

Marguerite,

I like the boot idea, but I don't know if that will affect your dog's ability to swim or not in the same way that some water shoes don't do people any favors...

We used high-traction abrasive grip tape on the starting platforms while I was on the high school swim team. This stuff rrrreally sticks and might be just enough to give your dog the friction s/he needs. It's also pretty cheap and comes in different colors.

Link is work/family safe: http://safewaytraction.com/AbrasiveAntiSlipTape.htm

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on August 4, 2011

Luk,

The Mad Pad has an extra inch of foam padding and is quite a bit stiffer than the Bailout, which adds a little confidence on high boulder problems where big falls onto uneven terrain are likely. It has the added advantage of backpack straps instead of basic carry handles, and the nylon doesn't pick up much debris like some liners do. It's not as comfy for midday catnaps, but it's a lot of pad for the money.

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on August 1, 2011

Osprey bladders are tough because they aren't transparent. It's simple enough for me to put my camelbak on the top of my pack where it's easy to get to and show security personnel (when asked) that, as Phil put it: "empty is empty." I've never been asked about it though, and only carried my camelbak reservoir three or four times through an airport.

Happy trails!

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Hunter Lea

Hunter Lea wrote an answer about on July 23, 2011

Josh,

This jacket will keep pretty much anything off, but that means it will keep pretty much everything in, too. Ultra-lightweight shells tend to have zero breathability because of the tight weave required to make a single-layer waterproof fabric.

It's better than a heavy-duty garbage back!

Happy trails!

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