Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin

Little Cottonwood Canyon, and the San Rafael Swell.

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Greg's Passions

Alpine Touring
Trad Climbing
Camping
Backpacking
Trail Running
Hiking
Alpine Skiing
Mountaineering
Sport Climbing

Greg's Bio

What drives me to be so active outdoors is the never ending pursuit to find my own limits. Many times I have set out on a journey to find my limits, and have repeatedly surpassed them without realizing it. Never second guess yourself, and never stop pushing the envelope!

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin wrote a review of on July 14, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: True to size

Stiff platform with a goretex membrane makes these boots mountain crushers. I wish they had a slightly softer heel cup so the break in time wasn't so long (I have roughly 25 miles in mine). Definitely recommend them to anyone looking for a mountain boot that can take a pair of strap on crampons.

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin wrote a review of on July 14, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

What makes these babies so great, huh? Well let me spill the beans to this mystery of the world.

They're light, but not so light you think you're wearing full blown running shorts.

The waist band is 100% the most comfortable waist band of any short I've owned.

They're light, and pack super small for backpacking missions.

They're short, but not crazy short. Keeps ya cool in the summer heat!

A bunch of different colors to match your style.

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin wrote a review of on June 4, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: True to size

The cotton on this shirt is a heavier weight type, and as such gives a great feel of quality. This shirt is definitely something I'd recommend. I have the Magma color, and it's pretty much as bright as it looks on here. Maybe just a little less so at the most.

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin wrote a review of on December 24, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Love this thing! Really... Super comfy, super well built, super spacious gear loops, and super safe. Metolius over builds every aspect of the harness to full strength specs with the exception of the rear bungee leg loops (I think) to 22KN. So you can accidentally clip your gear loop, and live to tell the tale! Seriously they do a great job, and this sucker is made in the good old U-S-A! Quality craftsmanship goes into everything Metolius makes, and it's apparent with this harness. Doubt I'll ever buy anything else for sport/trad climbing.

The twin belay loops work pretty well, and for the majority of my climbing I use them in unison. Used as such they're the same thickness of a normal BD belay loop so it's all the same to me as a user. However when rigging rappels or aid climbing they come in super handy. Having your rap set up on one side, and your personal on the other gives you a little extra play and flexibility in your set up/break down time when rapping long routes.

One caveat is that this thing doesn't have any ice clipper slots on the sides which is a huge bummer. I ice climb in the winter, and really need those. So my back up harness is a BD I've had for a few years, and only break out in the winter.

Regardless of this one small thing I would recommend this harness to anyone for any reason having to do with climbing.

I own a size Medium, and have a 32" waist with large skier thighs. She fits like a dream!

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin wrote an answer about on September 20, 2013

I'd give this ski the namesake of a "Mid Superfat" ski Mark. Not a 130mm but not 100mm, right in the middle. The 115mm waist will float like a pro, but allow you to engage your edges quickly for hard pack shredding thus giving you the best of both worlds for inbounds skiing.

Don't hesitate to call or chat in with any questions you may have regarding this or any other ski! 1-800-409-4502.

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin posted an image about on August 26, 2013

Epic Drom Bag Pose

Here I am in southern Utah enjoying a swig from my bag! I use the 4L year round for hiking, skiing, climbing, and camping. It's the only one I own, and the thing is TOUGH! Highly recommended for people who like compact, lightweight stuff!

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin wrote an answer about on June 19, 2013

Aaron,

This cord is suitable for setting up anchors, and top ropes. However if you wish to use this cord repeatedly for toproping, and let's say that is how you primarily access your climbing routes I would suggest something in the 7-8mm range.

This is strictly for the longevity of your cord. Should you use this 6mm repeatedly for an entire season of setting up TR's it will see significantly more wear and tear than something of a thicker diameter. I would push for the 7-8mm cord for setting up top ropes.

If you're looking for something to use for multipitch climbing I would suggest something along the 6-7mm range. This size will pack small, be lighter, and be easier to handle. You don't put as much strain or work on a piece of cord when multipitch climbing as you do when soley top roping off an anchor.

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Greg Gavin

Greg Gavin wrote an answer about on June 12, 2013

Good question! Generally for canyoneering...

Good question! Generally for canyoneering you want something 9mm or above due to abrasive rock, and weird traversing/walk back multi-pool descents. A 7mm tag line will not take the abuse you dish out in a slot, and trusting your and your partners lives to something that can't take that kind of treatment isn't wise.

I would suggest http://www.backcountry.com/edelweiss-canyon-static-9.6mm-rope?rr=t for a good starter canyoneering line. It's beefy enough to withstand several seasons worth of rappelling and abuse, but skinny enough to pack small, and be lightweight.

Also most slots have ever evolving anchor situations. Meaning you need to be prepared to descend the canyon as if there are no fixed bolted anchors. Having the know how can be developed over years of working you way up to more difficult canyons or by apprenticing under the tutelage of an old grey beard.

Something like http://www.backcountry.com/blue-water-pre-cut-accessory-cord-6mm-x-100ft is essential to having on your rack, and the knowledge of appropriate knots in different scenarios. Generally slot anchors will be anywhere from 1 to 2 bolts with cord/webbing tied into the bolt hangers, and a rappel ring at the master point. To a log jam tied off in the same manner. All the way to a stack of rocks wrapped with webbing.

Canyoneering is not like rock climbing in that rock climbers love to have super over built rappel anchors. Canyoneers love it sketchy! That said be safe, and have fun.

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