Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg

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Elias's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Skiing
Climbing

Elias's Bio

Yeah! Originally from Niagara Falls, NY, I graduated from SUNY Albany with degrees in Meteorology and Geography back in '02. Immediately afterwards, I moved west and started ski bumming in Tahoe. I finally ended up in Utah after seasonal stints in Montana and Jackson. I'm Buyer and Merchandiser of all things Ski and Paddle. The gear, not so much the clothes. I ski as often as I can, even over the summertime if I can find some snow. If it's not a ski day, then I'll be tagging along on road trips all over the West. Deserts, mountains, oceans...can't get enough.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote an answer about on November 6, 2013

What's up AJ - I'd go with the 110mm brake. The shop that mounts your bindings will give the brake arm a little bend if necessary. Pretty common practice. The 130mm brake will hang off the edge of your ski and, if it gets bent or damaged, can drag or catch. Hope this helps! Great binding by the way. Been on mine for two years. Pretty much replaced my season pass.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote an answer about on January 14, 2013

What's up D, good news. You can use any ski binding you want ( i wouldn't recommend tele bindings....). The demo had Marker Jesters with the brakes cut off. Crank the DIN as high as it will go. They told me that you do NOT want this thing coming off. If only 1 foot pops out, your other knee is going to pay a pretty huge price. If both bindings pop off, you have a looooong walk ahead of you. Viva.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote a review of on January 9, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Once you have a pair of these (or FKS) you basically have a lifetime supply of bindings. They can take a huge beating and are the most dependable bindings I've ever used. If you do explode out of your Pivot 18 binding, then you really earned it. These will hold on tight thanks to the large amount of elastic travel. Honestly I'm not big or rowdy enough to neeeeeed these bindings, but after buying a used pair 5 years ago (old Rossi version) from a former racer who put a few hard years on his, they are still going strong. You'll wear out your skis way before you wear out your bindings. Highly recommended!

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote a review of on January 7, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I can't get enough. It's just too much fun. Normally I wouldn't be too pumped to ski on something so very directional but the Cham 107 is a big exception. The unique rocker and sidecut recipe provides an unmatched combination of high speed stability and oops-watch-out agility. Much easier to ski in my opinion than the latest run of Legend series skis. Let's start with the rocker: a very low profile early rise nose (rocker starts at about the Y on the Dynastar tip logo) keeps the tips stable in variable snow while providing plenty of float for a relatively narrow 107mm waist. The rest of the ski is cambered all the way to the squared off tail. There's a relatively short running length on the edge since the tips and tails are tapered (think JJ-style) so the Cham ski is very agile for its size. The tail is super cool since it has the taper, but no rocker. This gives you that small running length for hard snow/carving since the last bit of the tail is off the snow but the whole ski is 'down' when you're running flat based or landing airs. It's awesome. Construction is classic Dynastar - hand made with a solid wood core and titanal reinforcement, thick sidewalls, and a seemingly indestructible base. Early season Snowbird can be merciless to a pair of new skis but the Chams have gotten through the autumn with nothing more than a bunch of character enhancing scrapes and scars. No core shots (despite very rocky traverses and a few direct on rock landings in thin snow) and the edges are all in place. The only negative that I can come up with is the weight, especially when paired up with the Pivot 18s. I haven't put them on a scale or anything but they are definitely hefty, probably helps with the stable ride and durability. I encourage any of you to grab a pair and point them at the most chopped up, skied out zones at your local resort and hit the gas. I think you'll be amazed at how fluid and burly the Cham 107 skis.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote a review of on January 2, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Looks like these are getting around. I brought it to a SCUBA shop to see if they'd fill it up and they said 'yes' before I even finished my sentence. It takes ~hour, costs only a couple of dollars, and you're ready to go. It's a simple 2-step process to get it hooked up into the pack and will only take a few seconds. Make sure to dub check the pressure before you head out (easily read thru a window on the cylinder's sleeve inside your pack) and get to trail breaking. Have fun be safe.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote a review of on November 19, 2012

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Picked these up at the beginning of last season (only change for 12/13 is the graphic) and ended up skiing them almost every day that I wasn't touring (Snowbird passholder). I'd say that the Influence 105 is more than enough ski for all but the deepest days. These were super fun all over the mountain - especially in chutes, chopped bowls, and trees. They carve much better than I expected too. They are a bit turny for a freeride ski, but I felt that it helped keep the ski loose and fun despite it being more damp than a lot of today's rocker skis. Despite the twinned tail, the Influence 105 isn't much of a freestyle ski. The sturdy core and metal matrix make this ski more of a directional all mountain stick with kind of a limited freestyle feel. Not much jibbing on these, but plenty of pop for airs. The bases are sturdy and survived last season's lean winter in pretty good shape. However you'll want to wax these regularly. I've already gotten back on them this season and am fired up for another winter on my Influence skis.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote an answer about on November 19, 2012

hi there. depends on where you live. out west? go 186 all day. however if you're skiing mostly the super tight trees and bumps back east then it might pay to go shorter. for reference i'm a transplanted east coaster skiing at Snowbird on the 186cm. I'm 5'9" and 145lbs.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote an answer about on October 26, 2012

I have both the JJ and the TST with Dynafit binders on them (SLC resident as well). Also with the G3 skins. I'd recommend the TST over the JJ for touring since the tail is cambered on the TST. More surface area for the uphill, pretty light, and a super fun ride back down.

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Answer flagged as Wrong. Not compatible with Marker Duke/Baron. Not ISO standard.. Click here to view.

Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote an answer about on December 5, 2011

Both skis on your hit list will shine in powder. The Patron has a burlier construction than the Bent Chet and, in my opinion, will be more fun to ski on an everyday basis. Especially if you're like me and your best freestyle days are behind you. If you're more into tricks and jibbing, the Bent Chet will be lighter and livelier. Honestly can't go wrong with either ski - take the Patron for a sturdier all-mountain ride or the Bent Chet for its lighter weight and more freestyle ready feel.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote a review of on November 18, 2011

4 5

The footprint and rocker profile of the BD AMPerage ski is very similar to the Rossi S7. Both feature camber underfoot with rockered tip and tail and a ski width that tapers off towards the tail. You get a very easy turning, directional all mountain ski. Two things separate the AMPerage from the competition - a very light weight cap construction and a significantly longer effective edge underfoot. You'll hear lots of folks comment on how easy it is to ski on the groomed snow, but I think the longer edge (and therefore longer cambered base) makes for a great touring ski. More skin contact on the way up vs most other rockered skis and the same dynamic and playful surfing feel on the way back down. In my opinion, the AMPerage is too soft to be a daily driver at a resort. I found the light weight and soft flex was easily overpowered in chopped up snow. However, in soft snow it was a really fun ride. I'd recommend this as your quiver pow ski at the resort or your full time touring ski if you prefer big surfy turns after your hike/skin/climb.

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Elias Littenberg

Elias Littenberg wrote an answer about on November 16, 2011

These are intended for resort skiers that might occasionally head out on short(er) hikes to hit kickers and gnarly lines out in the backcountry. Think snowmobile access or that cliff across the street. Definitely strong enough to be used full time at the resort. If you're thinking about dabbling in some bc skiing this year and don't want to commit to a whole new kit, there is no better product on the market. I love BCA gear (beacon, shovel, probe, and pack in my kit), but I've never seen anyone happy on their Trekkers.

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