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Dylan Sievertson

Dylan Sievertson

Olympics, Cascades and the water in between

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Dylan's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Paddling
Skiing
Climbing

Dylan's Bio

Dylan Sievertson

Dylan Sievertson wrote an answer about on January 1, 2011

They work remarkably well. Not only do they reduce calf fatigue but they increase traction by helping to distribute the weight more evenly during accents. I'm 5'10" 160 and they feel solid under my heels, and have never had a problem with an inadvertent disengagement.

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Dylan Sievertson

Dylan Sievertson wrote a review of on October 23, 2010

5 5

Title says it all. This duffel is made to be abused. Although I cant speak for long-term durability, so far its taken everything I can dish out and more. Although its technically not a waterproof bag, the PU coated material and welded seems sure make it act like one. All the handles have been stitched to material that has then been welded to the bag so not even stitching penetrations can cramp your style. The zippers is coated however they're the only part of the bag that lets the H2O sneak by. There is an external pocket and a fairly large internal mesh pocket. Other than that, its your standard duffel layout. 40L is a pretty middle of the road size. It can easily hold all my climbing gear, or a weekends worth of threads for a trip across the state. All in all its an awesome bag well worth the price.

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Dylan Sievertson

Dylan Sievertson wrote a review of on October 21, 2010

5 5

I bought this as my first rope and I couldn't be happier. Other than the very first time I uncoiled and ran it through my belay device, it has been completely kink free. It runs very smooth and has a good solid feel to it. I debated for a while on whether or not to spend the extra cash for the golden try treatment. I told myself "I'll never climb in the rain, why bother?" I ended up getting it for durability sake and am glad I did cause the very first time I ever tied into it I was tiptoeing around puddles of water in a steady drizzle. Point being, get the dry, it's worth it.

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Dylan Sievertson

Dylan Sievertson wrote an answer about on October 21, 2010

In about 40* weather, I actually think the Nano is slightly warmer. This might be due to the fact that the UL is through stitched while the nano is not, or at least not all the way through the liner. There was also a slight breeze blowing during my highly scientific test, which could also mean the wind proofing is superior on the nano. Side by side the jackets are very similar, they look to be equally puffy though when you feel the material the UL is loftier, which is expected since it is down. In the end I ended up going with the nano simply because I live in the Pacific NW and getting it wet is a distinct possibility.

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