Deling Ren

Deling Ren

Pacific Northwest

Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a review of on June 1, 2016

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I got a pair of 171cm this spring as my spring/summer setup. I have skied them about 10 times so far, totaling about 30,000 vertical ft.
* Late May, Mt Hood, summit to parking lot, 5500", hard, blue ice on 45-50 degree slope near the summit to slushy bunny slopes down below. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1k-8Acz_NHY
* Late April, Mt St Helens, summit to snow line, 4800", bullet proof ice near the summit to slush down below.
* Multiple times in April & May, Muir Snowfield on Mt Rainier, 2" of freshies on top of firm snow;
* Multiple times in April near Snoqualmie Pass, mostly slushy and soft snow.

I am absolutely in love with them. They grip extremely well on ice. I was very comfortable side skipping and making jump turns below the summit of Mt Hood where a fall can be very bad. The grippy edges also came handy when I was traversing while skinning up Panorama Face on Muir Snowfield. On soft and slushy snow, they are not too shabby either. It's very easy to initiate and get out of turns. Compared to my downhill skis (K2 Annex 108) and my fat AT skis (Dynafit Stoke 105), I feel like I have to engage the core a little more and quads a little less, which is good when my legs are tired after skinning 5000 ft. They are not as "bouncy" as heavier skis (and heavier boots). It took me some getting used to. But once I got used to it and learned to adjust the expectation, it was not an issue at all. Just be aware, there is a little learning curve there.

This ski has the reputation of being stiff and that is true. I feel very confident charging at a much faster speed than I normally do off piste and it doesn’t chatter even given its short length (I’m 175 pounds, so 171cm is a bit short for me).

They are also extremely lightweight. I normally carry skis A-frame when I have to carry them, just because diagonal carry throws off my balance. But I didn't find it a problem with these skis. I carried them diagonally on Mt Hood and hardly felt the weight. This saved the side straps for the poles. It also made access to the top pocket of the pack a lot easier.

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a review of on April 8, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

My wife has used it once for an overnight trip. The skin sticks very well with a heavy pack on a moderate slope (blue-blackish run, 30 degrees). The tension is continuously adjustable, unlike the BD skins. The only minor nuance is there is no way to tuck in the tail strap. It's rather not functional and the only person who would notice is the person behind you.

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a question about on April 6, 2015

The auti-bott plates were removable for the old versions. But it looks like they are rivetted to the new crampons on the new versions now? The plates are great on soft snow. But when I know the temps will be sub freezing all the time, I don't want to carry the plates.

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a review of on April 2, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I have skied about 40 days in them and I'm getting a new pair for my wife's skis. Radical is perfect if you are looking for lightweight bindings without sacrificing downhill performance.
They are a nice balance for an alpine setting. The DIN setting of 4-10 is sufficient for even a big aggressive skier unless you jump off cliffs regularly. They are slightly heavier than the Speed version but I like the fact that they come with brakes, which gives me some peace of mind when transitioning in a tight and slant spot. I had skied in a Fritschi binding for a few seasons before and when I first converted, I was a little suspicion about the downhill performance. That suspicion has been completely eliminated after a few runs.

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a question about on March 10, 2015

Spacers?
In my two previous setups, I have always used B&D crampons. The nice thing about B&D is they have spacers so that they will have more purchase into the snow when the riser is up. See attached picture.
Those two holes on these Dynafit bindings seem to be designed for spacers. Does anyone know if there are any aftermarket spacers for them?

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a review of on August 16, 2012

5 5

I had worn out a pair of high gaiters a couple of seasons ago and started using these low gaiters. They are super lightweight and are sufficient for summer climbing when you are not post-holing all the time. They are excellent for lightweight mountaineering.

They are not gore-tex but I never had problem with their water-proof-ness. I use them on glaciers all the time. As long as the boots are water proof, the gaiters are not a problem. If the boots are not water proof, the gaiters are the least of your concern.

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a review of on February 10, 2010

5 5

I have used these crampons on about 20 climbs so far, including Rainier, Hood, Baker, Little Tahoma, even more technicl Mt Jefferson Jeff Park glacier route. I haven't had any problems with them. I have used Stubai and CAMP lightweight crampons too but still love Grivel. I removed the antibott plates to save weight. No they are not designed to climb on steep ice. Get a pair of G12 or G14 for that purpose.

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a review of on September 12, 2009

3 5

I have owned it for one season and have worn it to the top of Jefferson, Hood, Rainier, Baker, Shuksan, Eldorado, little T and some other local peaks. They won't weigh your feet down. If you want something warmer, however, e.g. Mt Rainier in the winter/spring, I'd recommend La Sportiva Glacier.

My only complaints is these boots don't stand much abuse. Mine have already shown signs of wear and tear after one season. I had to glue the rands on both boots. I have been wearing them pretty much every weekend since spring though.

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Deling Ren

Deling Renwrote a review of on September 12, 2009

4 5

Pro: feather light. 23g is THE lightest biner you can find on the market today.

Con: clearance is a little low. Not really a con though. Considering the size, that's expected.

It's an ideal biner for clipping to the pro end. I do not recommend using it on the rope end though. I also do not recommend using it on the snow when you have to handle the gears wearing gloves.

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