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David Duffy

David Duffy

Based out of Jackson, WY

david's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Snowboarding
Biking

david's Bio

Home: Washington
In Washington I like to ride Stevens Pass, Alpental, Baker, and when it snows in Seattle I'll try to get some friends together and do the urban jib thing.

Homes away from home include Whistler BC, which I try to frequent being that it's only a few hours away, and Jackson Hole WY, where I'm moving next winter (09-10).

I've snowboarded for 13 seasons now and have (thankfully) worked my way up through the ranks of rental step-in boards into the realm of real riding that requires multiple boards and stances. I currently own a Rome Anthem, which I will be returning to REI at the beginning of next season because it's lamination is shite. I also have a Gnu Rider's Choice, which I absolutely love and a recommend some form of reverse camber and/or magnetraction ride to everyone I come across because it's not a gimmick; it works.

When I'm not snowboarding I'm working at a bar so I can afford to snowboard again soon, or I like to ride my crf 450 (that's got an engine, yes. Don't whine at me about the inherent evils of the ORV, I'm a backpacker too.)

David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on October 11, 2012

4 5

These boots are medium width, so you can get away with them if you have a wider foot with no problem. Length-wise, they are true to size as well, so just look at the sizing chart to figure out your UK to US conversion.

I keep saying this about Salomon boots, and this year they seem to have taken a step forward with this problem with the Pledge, but Salomons have this issue that they literally manufacture into their boots where snow gets lodged in on either side of the lacing system, between the laces and the tongue. These ones are a little better than normal because the lacing system lies flatter to the tongue, but in years past the Pledge has suffered from the effects of this problem.

Salomon gives these a 7 out of 10 in their stiffness rating; however, I think they're a little softer than that. And if you ride more than a few weeks a year, you'll definitely see that the stiffness they build into these breaks in very quickly. They're a fine boot to hike in or hit the park/pipe with confidence. Send 'er!

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on October 11, 2012

3 5

Alright, so to start off, I have to say that these boots run a bit narrow, so if you have a wide foot, you probably want to look elsewhere. Other than that, they are true to size. Also, the inner lacing boa is shorter than in years past, so you won't be able to wrap it around your leg and hook it back on to the front of the boot anymore. I've kind of yet to find a good place to put the inner lace clip. Also, aesthetically speaking, the boot in the picture is probably an 8 or a 9, as well. I've heard people suggesting that the F22 has a smaller footprint, but let it be known: the bigger size boots definitely do not have a significantly reduced footprint size. You'll still need your XL bindings.

However, Salomon keeps making the lacing system of their boots with this chasm between the laces and the tongue of the boot. This can eventually make for wet feet, since snow can get into that area of the boot, melt a little, and end up taking up permanent residence. You can see what I'm talking about in the sample picture for the boot at the top of the page: on the sides of the outer lacing system over the arch of the foot, there are two little dead spaces on either side of the tongue that can fill up with snow. I had a pair of the Salomon Pledges from a few years ago, and they had a similar design flaw, which led to wet feet after about 4 hours. Had some 32's before that, same story.

Melting snow leads to wet feet = wet boots = stank boots = stank feet = you not getting laid. This is a problem that needs to be addressed.

Other than this, these are great boots. Very stiff, but my spider senses tell me about 2-3 weeks of riding in them will break them in, no problem. And remember, they are a narrow footbed design.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 16, 2012

5 5

Five years ago, I got these goggles as a Christmas gift. One year later, I moved to Jackson WY and started riding 100+ days a year with these goggles exclusively. I stocked up on some different types of lenses (The Feenom has a hilariously diverse selection of replacement lenses) and would swap them out as needed for low light, sun, fog, whatever.

I eventually wore through the strap, but because of the construction of the goggles, all I had to do was rivet the strap back onto the plastic frame and I was good to go again within one week (took a long time to build up the motivation to go to the hardware store).

I'm still wearing them daily, even after 100+ days a year, every season since I've owned them. These aren't just the best goggles I've ever owned, I have to say these are the most reliable piece of snowboarding equipment I have ever owned.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 16, 2012

5 5

Ladies and gentlemen, you are looking at one damn sweet pair of goggles.

Fit-wise, these babies are without a doubt, WAY too big for anyone who could describe their head/face as "smaller". But, if you rock a medium to large dome, these will fit you just fine. Another thing you might notice (or rather, NOT notice) when you're wearing them is the frame. You pretty much can't see it when you've got them on.

You can wear them with a helmet, as long as you wear the strap outside. I wouldn't recommend wearing them underneath, jib-kid style -- they might be uncomfortable because of the raised rubber thing on the straps, not to mention the size of the lenses. A pair similar to these that fits straps-under is the VZ Feenom.

Nonetheless, since I have a big head/face structure and wear goggles outside of my helmet, these are awesome.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 12, 2012

4 5

Alright, it might sound like I'm complaining, but let me just say these pants are rad. They're made with a kind of material that seems about half way between soft shell and hard shell, and are definitely waterproof as f***. I ended up getting an XL pair, which you can wear with a 33" waist if you've got a belt to go with it. I'm 6'1", 200 lbs with a 33" waist and I'd actually recommend the large instead.

Regardless, these are a nice choice if you're not looking to spend 3L money, but still want a pair of pants that will keep the farts in and the powder out.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 12, 2012

4 5

I got these in a Large, I'm 6'1" 200 lbs with a 33" waist and they fit pretty much true to form. I have to say that the leg vent placement is a little weird -- it goes across your knees. But, other than remembering not to kneel in the snow when your vents are open, there are no other problems.

They're nothing super special, but I'm pretty satisfied.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 12, 2012

5 5

I say YES (no, not YES the board manufacturer).

If you have 11.5+ size feet, chances are you've experience that unspeakably annoying part of a powdery traverse where everyone blows by you as you're one-footing it and fogging up your shit. Well, no more.

First off, this board is light. I'm not sure if that's a worry in the durability department, but most people aren't going to challenge the average snowboard's integrity for quite a few years, so that's pretty much a non-issue. Second, there is no skimping on the waistband. You can ride this board 5cm shorter than your average regular-camber normal-width board and still float WAY better in powder. Also, there is usually an assumption that wide boards are annoyingly stiff compared to their regular counterparts. I personally like to ride flexy boards, and while this is no park pickle, it's also not a steep-and-deep only fence post. The flex is there when you need it, and that's all you can ask.

One potentially annoying thing is the Burton proprietary binding mount system, which is not compatible with a lot of older bindings. Check your base plates to make sure that you can mount up on the single-track system if you have binders from say... 2008 or earlier. Or, just check them anyways.

I loved this board. It can easily be your one-stick quiver.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 12, 2012

4 5

I got these off of a buddy for pretty cheap, and I'm happy to tell you that they're worth a lot more than I would usually pay for Burton gear.

First off, even though they use an all-plastic construction and there is a fair bit of flex, everything is still pretty solid feeling. I haven't had anything break in spite of daily use. Also, both the toe and heel straps are super-comfortable and adjustable, so there's no surprises there if you don't have the smallest boots in the world.

Potential downsides: the inside of the heel strap is prone to wearing out quickly because of the fluffy, comfortable stuff it's made from. I don't know what I'd recommend doing about that, but it's a fairly minor flaw. Also, the ladders end up stripping on me in a pretty-damn-quick sort of fashion, so keep a Burton dealer close -- in my experience, I think they are obligated to swap out your trashed ones for new ones as you need them.

Across the board, bindings have gotten shittier as time has progressed. These aren't exactly old school, but they are comfy and sure do the trick.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on August 31, 2012

1 5

Not a huge surprise with all the stock that's left from last year and ridiculous sales you see on this item, but these pants are crap.

I had a previous year of this model and the crotch ripped out while I was making a jump, so I shipped em back to Bond and they (very nicely) shipped me back a pair of the newer model (which is this one).

I hate to say it, because the Bond people were so nice, but they're still total shit. The crotch ripped out again, which is to say that the seam just blew open. Speaking of blown out seams, the back right pocket blew out too (on the seam) so forget putting your wallet there. BUT, when you try to put your wallet in either of the cargo pockets, you realize that they are really just for looks, because anything you put in there rests nicely right against your kneecap. Not a great place for a wallet/flask/etc.

If you get these pants for free, take em. If you have to actually pay for them, you'd be better off with anything else.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on February 24, 2011

Don't let the flat camber scare you away.
4 5

If you're looking for an alternative to the park pickle and the skate banana, this one stands up to the challenge. This board is a ripper, like it's predecessors all have been. Like it's name says, it's wheelhouse is the park, boxes and rails, pipe, and anything else you might like to jib off of.

As for the technical stuff:
- The Jib Rocker seems like a weird idea at first, but after you ride it you'll see that it seems to get the job done. There's still plenty of pop for that ollie over the slow sign -- make sure to mention that to anyone who tries to tell you otherwise. She's definitely a flexible board, but that's what you want out of a park board.
- I have no idea what the V-Shaped Matrix carbon whatever-its-called is supposed to do, but tricky gimmicks are apparently needed to sell snowboards these days, so that's fine.
- HyperProgressive construction isn't going to save your ass if you happen to not set 'er down the right way, so don't expect any miracles there either. You will still have to land your own tricks.

But this ain't no one-trick park pony. You can pretty much rip this thing anywhere on the mountain. There's no sidecut waves or extra contact points, so you'll have to look elsewhere if you want that kind of flostam. Works well in the deep stuff too, but remember the float isn't as good as a full reverse board, so you'll probably still need to keep the old 162 around.

Bottom line: you'll probably end up cheating on your other boards.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote an answer about on December 21, 2010

Thanks for your response. I obviously found those tabs, or I wouldn't know you could adjust this camera at all. My question was how, if at all, it is possible to INDIVIDUALLY adjust the EV +/- & contrast settings for the Hi and Lo settings on the camera. I am aware that you can adjust these settings using the "Configure Camera" option in Storyteller, but the changes you make apply for both the Hi and Lo settings, so they are not individually adjustable. Some people have mentioned that they were able to make white balance adjustments that were unique to each setting, but I can't seem to figure out how.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote an answer about on September 21, 2010

Sidi stopped manufacturing the Bullet 2 (in 2008 I believe), although you might not think so with all the stores that still carry the shoe online. The Giau is the next generation of the Bullet series, as you can probably tell by the remarkably similar looks. Build and material quality are still at or near the same standards as before, so you're still going to be getting a great shoe for your money.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 21, 2010

5 5

It seems to me that people are starting to think that you need solid metal to get your average tire off of the rim these days. Let me just say: that viewpoint was concocted as is supported by folks that probably don't know much about tire levers.

These babies are made from metal that is coated in plastic, so can keep that anodizing on your rim. Use the first two to peel back the bead (at the same time), then hook em under a spoke so they don't go flyin'. That third one makes quick work of the rest of the tire, all for under $10.

REMEMBER: DO NOT use tire levers to get your tire back on. ...well, not on the second bead anyways. Doing so you can pinch weak spots in the tube that are more prone to flatting. Just sayin.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on September 21, 2010

Don't Expect Problems
5 5

If you've ever heard of the legendary unbreakability of the Sidi Bullet series shoes, let me tell you that these next gen babies are just as sweet. In two years these shoes have taken thousands of miles of city commuting (I hate walking in road shoes) and about half as many again off-road, and they've never let me down.

Comfort is key for a shoe like this. I have used some Shimano shoes as well and these are quite a bit more comfortable. Like all bike shoes, the soles are stiff, but no so much that they're annoying to walk in. I actually forgot my regular shoes a for work a few times and had to wear these to bartend in, and I have to say while I wasn't in heaven, they definitely didn't kill me either. Sizing is pretty accurate -- I wear a size 11, so the 45s fit best for me. Durability-wise, I don't think there's anything worse you can do to the soul of a mountain shoe than put it through daily use on the road, and these things have held up absolutely fantastic. In your face, Chris!

For MTB, these guys are great too. Get em dirty? Just blast em with a hose -- always worked for me. Wide open cleat design and a couple of spikes on the toe give good traction in the mud, at least as much as your typical mountain bike tire can manage.

Can't go wrong with these babies!

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on August 31, 2010

3 5

On the plus side, if you're in the market for a cheap new full-face, but you're not so stoked on the idea of getting one from a pawn shop, then you can't do much better than this helmet. It's got pretty much everything you need to avoid dental work if you happen to crash straight onto your face.

On the other hand, when pitted against comparable full face helmets, this one comes up a little short. It doesn't feel flimsy, but the corner-cutting build quality shows starts to show after about a month of use. For example, the liner material in mine can be popped all the way off from around the crown of the eye opening. You can shove it back in alright, and a little glue would go a long way toward fixing the problem, but it sucks that they didn't just glue it in the first place. Another thing is the silver mesh in the full-face part of the helmet isn't attached to anything, so you'll find that it can move around pretty freely.

Size-wise, I normally wear a large, and Six Six One's large fits my head alright, although I would probably say it fits a little tighter than other helmets I've worn from Bell, Giro and about the same as Troy Lee. Bottom line: if you have the chance, definitely try it on at your LBS. All helmets have a different fit and feel, and this one is no exception. To be honest, this one feels more like a hat than a helmet -- probably because it's lightweight, and tightest around the upper portion of your head. The eye opening is also SUPER wide, so you'll never have any lateral field of view issues with this thing on.

Hey, I like cheap stuff just as much as the next guy. I'll probably be rocking this helmet into next year when hopefully I'll get a raise or strike gold and can afford one that's built a little better. In the meantime though, this one does just fine.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on August 31, 2010

One Stout Puppy.
5 5

These babies are mean, but in a good way. Once you pull em out of the box you know they're built for abuse -- partially because they're not exactly light, but also because they've got that wide profile and generally just look beastly.

My LBS says thumbs up, they're pretty close to true right out of the box, and are a good deal for about $150. Be warned if you're not planning on taking these rims in for a quick true before you put 'em on your bike -- they're bored for Presta valves (not Schrader) so if you plan on running Schraders, you'll have to trust yourself not to compromise the integrity of your hoop when you drill it out yourself. You might as well just take it to your LBS, they probably have a drill press and will do the job right.

After a few serious days of riding I can say that these rims are pretty solid. It feels like they've got just a little bit of flex side-to-side that you might notice in hard-charging corners; really minimal though -- hardly noticeable unless compared to nicer builds . I also believe this wheel has double-butted spokes -- not the greatest place to be saving weight on a DH rim, but I haven't had any issues so far.

This rim feels a lot more sturdy than the Sun Single Track that it replaced. No rim is ever totally bomb proof, but for the money I'd say this rim is a great option.

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David Duffy

David Duffy wrote a review of on August 20, 2010

Gets the job done
4 5

I've been on many a rainy, cold winter ride with these gloves on, and in spite of the fact that they don't actually keep your hands dry, having them on is preferable to a pair of Gore mittens or snow gloves.

The Good: The single most shining thing about these gloves to me has been that the velcro strap is placed so perfectly for pairing with the Pearl Izumi waterproof shell. The shell's sleeve cuffs are tight elastic, and they stretch just enough to get over the rubber velcro strap and create a waterproof seal. There are other good things too, like the soft place on the back of the thumb to clean off your runny nose, and the large gel pads under the palms that keep your hands from going numb on the bars.

On the negative side, the little rubber dots on the fingers and palm are really for show only -- they jump ship soon after you start using them on a regular basis. Also the stitching in the thumb is a little awkward and gives you a little club-knuckle look. Neither are huge issues though.

I don't recommend these for people riding in sub-freezing temperatures, as they are pretty much no good below 40. However, if all you need is to be a little warmer and more comfortable on wet or cold weather rides, these will do the job nicely.

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