Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart

Chicago Area

Dan Reinhart's Passions

Climbing

Dan Reinhart's Bio

Hiker, climber and adventurer. Appetite for road trips, summer and winter mountaineering, and climbing outings.

Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on April 8, 2012

5 5

I am very pleased with this edition of the Paramount pant. Compared with the build from six or seven years ago, the addition of the elastic waist and the excellent built-in belt, today's Paramount surpasses the past versions.

The belt buckle is not prone to undesired opening when bumped or squeezed by a pack's waistbelt. The snap closure is a lot easier to work with than the past large, single button.

The material seems about the same, perhaps a touch heavier, and the DWR is definitely better.

All around, I like the new version, and am buying another pair. I also appreciate that North Face offers a range of inseam lengths, particularly since I take a shorter length.

These pants are the only North Face goods I buy, because I haven't seen anything comparable. I very much like the Exofficio Nio Amphi series for lighter, warm weather use, but the Paramounts definitely belong in the mountains.

Why don't I buy any other North Face goods? Much like Black Diamond, they are so restrictive to their dealers regarding sales, that I have shifted almost completely away from North Face, and totally away from Black Diamond. I like most of the goods from both firms, but they offer very reduced value due to price. I have taken up with Marmot, Exofficio, Metolius, Mammut, Petzl to meet my clothing and climbing gear needs, and I shop hard to find the clearances, end-of-season, overstock, etc., to gain value.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on October 26, 2010

5 5

I am absolutely delighted with this pack. I bought it for use as a minimal summit pack for climbs less than a day. But it has also proven super for afternoon hikes and non-technical uses.

The minimalist waist belt buckles fairly high on the hips, facilitating use with a harness. It also holds a 100 oz (!!) Camelback or MSR hydration system, and has hydration ports exiting the top of the pack for both left and right-hand usage.

I can fit 3 liters of water, a first aid kit, a stuff sack of essentials, a weather layer and a lunch. Just what I need, and nothing more.

This is one of the few Black Diamond items that doesn't carry a rather prohibitive price. I was able to buy it on sale, and can strongly recommend it to others looking for a tough, minimalistic pack that can be toted in a larger pack for use on summit, or it can serve as the supply pack for an afternoon outing.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on September 18, 2010

5 5

For multi-pitch trad, this is my choice for a master point biner. It has a broad, flat basket that doesn't crowd the collection of biners that tend to accrue to the master point. I like it a lot.

I'm disappointed today that the screw lock is not available. I don't use the self-lockers since I use these for rock in summer and ice / snow in winter. I needed to pick up another one for a trip in two weeks.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on January 7, 2010

4 5

After buying dozens of stuff sacks from OR over the years, I've grown tired of the price increases, taking the daisychains off several models, taking the dust flaps off, ... just generally cheapening the product, while increasing the price. So, I wanted to try some Summit sacks.It's a win!! Good, straight sacks, very well made, and I think they're great.So, that's two traditional suppliers I've avoided this year (Black Diamond was the other, due to their anti-sale, anti-discounting practices.).I will stick with this product! Thanks!!

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on November 28, 2008

5 5

I've used both the Triact and the Screwgate versions of this carabiner.

After a lot of analysis of top-rope safety issues, I've adopted a practice of using a pair of Triact Williams for TR master points. Too many times, beiners get flipped around on top-rope, especially when climbers are topping out. With the Triact William, I don't have to worry about gate direction and the issue of it unscrewing over time. It's a virtual impossibility to hit the right combination of scrapes and loads to permit the gate to open. It's the safest master point I can come up with using standard gear.

For trad, I use the Screwgate Williams for my main anchor masterpoints. The extra clipping space is very welcome, and the key nose is a great feature because I never have to fight with the biner snagging a cordelette or a wire.

The fit and finish is also impressive ... it's a first rate piece of gear.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on October 10, 2008

4 5

This is a non-alcohol disinfectant that won't add to the misery of "mountain fingers" by further drying the skin like purell-type hand sanitizers. Also, it's effective for use in first aid against germs and fungus, so it serves a double purpose! But caution ... of the four I bought at different times, all of them had loose caps, and one drained out completely during shipment. Check the lid when it arrives.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on August 11, 2008

5 5

I just bought another one for use in the wilderness. Just about any helmet that passes UIAA or CE can stop one small rock or a head-bang. But the lighter helmets can only take ONE hit reliably. If your not in a position to retire the helmet and break out a new one, you are in deep issues. So, if you can drive up to the crag, you can use any approved helmet successfully, but if you're in the mountains or wilderness, you want something with much greater survivability. In my opinion, that's an Ecrin.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on June 16, 2008

4 5

I have used this series for several years, and planned all my larger outings with it. If you are willing to fight through the 1980's style installation, the user interface, which is neither windows nor unix in nature, and "fiddle" with it as necessary, you can achieve very acceptable, custom results. You can also use plasticized paper to create ruggedized maps. And in any format (under about 24 x 28) that you want. The road overlays don't precisely match the road in the topo, but they probably had the digitizing done overseas ... what do you expect? Despite all its warts, it is a unique and effective product, just not easy to install, to use or to get the prints you want on the first try.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on May 21, 2008

4 5

These insoles have relatively high volume, which is what I need with my low-volume feet. They are fairly comparable to the Ed Viesters in terms of rigidity and shape. The surface fabric is somewhat prone to wrinkling during forming, but they can be reheated and reformed to reduce the wrinkles. They feel very good in terms of keeping the foot immobilized in the boot.

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Dan Reinhart

Dan Reinhart wrote a review of on December 27, 2007

5 5

I really wanted to succeed with these Pitons. My "standard" shoe is the women's Mythos. I have very narrow feet, and so far, the Mythos achieved the best fit I've known. But the Mythos were very painful for trad crack climbing, in part due to the superb, long lacing system. It put laces over my foot way down at the "business end" where the thinner leather and the laces became hurtful during thin jams.

So, after checking around and looking, the Pitons appeared to be a marvelous shoe for trad cracks, with extremely thick rubber encasing the toebox area. I tried a number of sizes to identify the smallest size I could stand for break-in, in order to achieve the narrowest insole.

Despite these efforts, there just wasn't any way I would be able to climb with them, not because of the shoe's build, but because my foot could not adequately fill the shoe. With the best size match, I still had about a centimeter of space between my lesser toes and the perimeter of the shoe.

I admire the build and style of these shoes, and every user I spoke to had glowing praise for them. Unfortunately, a person with an A/B foot will not be able to obtain a fit permitting safe climbing.

I'm back in the Sportiva line, trying some Barracudas, that may fit acceptably, but they will never provide the heavy coverage and protection that the Pitons would have. Those with D/E feet who want some maximum grip, grab and coverage in the toebox should be delighted with Pitons.

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