D. Schonbrun

D. Schonbrun

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D. Schonbrun

D. Schonbrun wrote a review of on January 24, 2011

4 5

Just bought them after demoing and used them in an intermediate WI course. They are very light... some may want to add massolettes for pure WI, esp if the ice is brittle/hard. For alpine, they are wonderful in Piolet Panne, Canne, and Manche; particularly on moderate alpine slopes (30-60 degrees). On WI 5, or getting over bulges, I found the Nomic's to be slightly better. Given that I wanted an all around tool for vertical and lower angle ice... the Quark's were a better fit. I found that for Alpine or WI, the trigger rest is best raised up about 1-2 inches above the orange plastic. You don't need the trigger finger if you're in pure ice. For mixed, the trigger is helpful to place delicately and to rotate. The moveable Trigger Rest is lovely... very flexible and comfortable. Hopefully it will hold up and not break if/when it impacts Ice. I'm a bit worries about how much material there is below the holes at the bolt... seems thin and apt to cracking in cold conditions if impacted. We will see in time if this becomes and issue. I used the tools leashless most of the time, and with a Grivel elastic leash system (worked well). I'd recommend these tools to anyone looking at alpine and WI/M 2-4 as their principal interests. For WI/M 5+, I think there are better choices.

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D. Schonbrun

D. Schonbrun wrote an answer about on January 11, 2011

If you're moving consistently... probably around 5-7F. If static, around 15F. If you want this for all around use (as many of us do), use a GTX gaiter which will add warmth to the lower leg, and make sure you have good circulation in the boot. Finding the right combination of lace tension, socks, and insoles is key to happy feet.

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D. Schonbrun

D. Schonbrun wrote an answer about on January 11, 2011

It Depends on the temp. The Freney's don't have a removable liner. As with all boots of this type, it may be challenging to dry them at night whilst in a tent. If you are bunking in a structure and have heating, then you're fine. If not, I might go with a boot that has a removable liner which you can place in your bag at night to dry it out and warm it up.

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D. Schonbrun

D. Schonbrun wrote an answer about on January 10, 2011

For a 7,000m peak, you cannot wear a Leather boot like the Nepal's. You need a plastic shell, with a separable liner, and an overboot/gaiter. The least warm boot I would even consider for that altitude would be the Scarpa 6000 guide. Boots for 8,000m would be advisable... Sportiva Olympus Mons, Millet Everest, Scarpa 8000, Kayland 8001

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D. Schonbrun

D. Schonbrun wrote an answer about on January 10, 2011

Avg Temp on Vinson is about -20F during summer and the Massif tops out at 4,900m. I don't think this boot is overkill, but if you're not going to go to 8,000m peaks regularly, you could go with a plastic 2 layer boot and add an overboot. That would give you more flexibility... The Millet's are great, but very warm for most applications below 6,000m.

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D. Schonbrun

D. Schonbrun wrote an answer about on January 9, 2011

BD's harnesses are UIAA and CEN certified... check with the race officials, but it's likely more than adequate. That said, you will need a bosun's chair attachment for longer work sessions. The leg straps won't be very comfortable to sit in for more than a few minutes.

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