Cory Akin

Cory Akin

The Wasatch, Jackson Hole, Your Mom's House

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Cory's Passions

Alpine Touring
Camping
Mountaineering
Sport Climbing

Cory's Bio

I started skiing/hiking in Northern Wyoming and moved to SLC for the pow.

The Wasatch is an awesome place for pretty much everything outdoors. The snow is usually light and plentiful with great access to touring. And since I've gotten into climbing, I've realized not everyone comes here just for the skiing.

Still, I miss Wyoming some times. Way less people. Easier to drink.

Ext 4186

Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on March 17, 2013

5 5

When I first received this jacket, I was a little disappointed by the lack of , well, jacket. It's a very thin jacket. For it's price you would expect something like the Patagonia Down Sweater, which has substantially more girth.

But, after putting it to use, I am absolutely pleased with my purchase. For being a thin, slim fitting jacket, it is VERY warm. I use it as my insulating piece beneath an Arcteryx Theta SV, and the combination is perfect. It does a great job on colder days when temps are below freezing, although if the sun is out, and temps begin to climb at or slightly above freezing, I found the combination Atom LT/Theta SV was almost too warm. That's a good thing, in my opinion, being as I am confident I won't need any extra layers unless the temp REALLY drops.

For sizing purposes, I am 5'11", weight 180, have a 33-34 in waist, and I went with a Medium. The medium is perfect as a slim fitting, layering piece, although if I were to use this as an around-town jacket, I would go with a large for a more casual look. For reference, I wear a medium in the Patagonia Down Sweater, which is a nice, casual fit. So the Atom LT does fit slimmer.

In conclusion- great jacket, great for layering, very pleased

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on March 13, 2013

4 5

these are the first shoes ive ever owned, and i feel it was a good start. ive put an o.k. amount of days on these (maybe 20 or so)- mostly outdoor, but a decent amount indoor since i recently got a gym membership. the rubber has held up well. not a lot of significant wear.

this wouldn't be considered a technical shoe- its fairly soft. but for using it as a beginner shoe, it does a good job.

as for sizing, i wear a 9.5-10 street shoe, and i got these in a 9.5. if i were to do it over, i would go with a 10 or 10.5, given these fit a little narrower than expected. for reference, though, my foot is a little funky after being in ski boots so many days

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on March 13, 2013

5 5

I really like these shorts. The stretchy material is great for climbing, exercising, or just lazing around the house. These are incredibly light, but they feel strong as well. I haven't used them for water sports as other reviews have mentioned, but I'm sure they will work great.

The pockets are a bit shallow, but there is a zip pocket on the rip leg which works great for holding money, keys, crack, etc.

For sizing- I wear a 33-34 in jeans, have big skier quads, a bit of a beer gut, and a size Large works great with these shorts.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on March 13, 2013

5 5

These are great shorts. They are lightweight, move well when you are active, and feel durable. They are nearly identical to the Stoic Thrive SUP, with the only noticeable difference being no third zip-up pocket. The length on this feels the same as the Thrive SUP- I'm 5'11" and these go just below my knee.

For sizing- I have a 33-34 waist and a Large fits awesome.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 26, 2013

5 5

I have not even worn it skiing yet. BUT, I know people have lots of questions about sizes. I am 5'11", 185lbs with a beer gut (33-34 inch waist). I have a Medium and it fits me great. I've tried it on with an Arcteryx Atom LT and a baselayer, and it's perfect. The cut is also awesome. This is one of the longer pieces Arcterxy offers, and I wouldn't want it cut any shorter for a ski jacket. The back goes down about mid-bum.
As other people have said, it's a fairly loud jacket. But for the protection and strength of fabric, that comes with the territory.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

There's really no need to go indepth with this review- the JJ's are amazing. I have Dynafits on mine and completely love the set up.
These will always get 5 star reviews until they make something better.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote an answer about on February 17, 2013

I'm mostly going to echo what Hap has said- I have these mounted with Dynafit Vertical STs, wearing Dynafit Titan Ultralights, and love them.
I have found this to be an incredibly light set up. Most people who pick up my boards comment how light they feel. But more importantly, it's an absolutely amazing ski. I ski 60/40 backcountry/ resort (I only use these out of bounds), so if I'm hiking that often, I want something which is a good ski for the deepest days out there, given that Utah generally has soft snow.
As Hap mentioned, kick turns are a bit more difficult, although not a deal breaker. Mine are mounted on the factory line (-5cm), and even with that, it feels like I need to push my lead foot out a little further up the track than usual to keep from stepping on the trailing ski. Not a big deal, though, as I usually only notice this on deep, steep kick turns.
The tail clip CAN slide off given its a twin tip. It's really dependent on whether or not you catch it on something while skinning, such as a tree branch, or your ski when making a kick turn. I've honestly not found it to be a nuisance. If anything, it's just a reason to grab some water and snack.
I absolutely recommend these for touring. Best ski I've ever ridden

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote an answer about on February 17, 2013

Brendan...

In my experience, these skis feel much shorter than their actual length. I was on the 188 and felt like I could turn on a dime. As Wally mentioned, these have a lot of rocker.
The S7's are also a softer ski than the Mantra, which will make initiating a turn much easier.
Go with the 188 and obtain happiness.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I can't believe this is the first review of the year- perhaps everyone has switched to Rocker 2's or JJ's by now. Too bad, because this ski deserves 5 stars every year it comes out, right up until they make something better.
I've put a lot more days on the Armada JJ myself, but the S7 is not a lot different. It's very turny- I'm 5'11", 185 lbs, and found the 188 skis like a 170. Also, it straight FLOATS, as you could imagine. The days I had it out were very deep, and at no point was I worried about going under and not coming back out.
What I love about skis like this and the JJ is that you get the best aspects of big, super fat skis, which is the ability to float at ease. But unlike super fats, which tend to keep you on top of the snow, you can dive into the depths, swivel around a bit, and then pop out when you want. Overall, I feel there are more turning shapes/types with a ski like this.
As a comparison, the S7 does feel softer than the JJ. It's not a big difference, but I think the JJ holds an arc on hard snow better.
The S7 is also an awesome touring option. I see a lot of these in the backcountry in the Wasatch, and for good reason.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

this is a great ski, a lot different than what I was on previous to riding it (Armada JJ's, Black Diamond Megawatts, both of which are poppier, less damp), but a great ski.
I'm very impressed by it's strength- it's damp, holds an arc really well, and can absorb bumps if you let it. I also found that it floats very nicely and is quick in untouched snow.
Hoping to get more days on it soon

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Given this ski's girth (132 mm underfoot), I feel like it's taking the backseat to skis that are in the 115-120mm underfoot range, although that's sad, being as this is one of the best pow skis I've ridden.
The size does seem daunting at first- took me a few runs to get over how big the shovel is- but once I got the hang of it, I was hooked. The Kuro is a hard arcing, super smooth ski that will destroy everything it encounters.
With it's size and strength, it isn't the best billy-goating ski, although you will find with it's full rocker profile, it's not the worst either by a long shot.
I loved the fact that you could stand directly on top of the ski in the deepest snow out there with no fear of the tips getting sucked under.
Along with it's power, I also found it to be fairly poppy when you wanted to ollie over a bump or an obstacle.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used BD Ascensions for a number of years now and have always been impressed. The grip is great (I'm in the Wasatch, so there's lots of steep skinning). And I haven't noticed any issues with glide (Mohair may glide better, but I'm willing to give up a little for more grip).
They are very easy to cut as well.

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote an answer about on February 17, 2013

No offense to LightRanger, but these are NOT meant to fit in the Guardians.
Check out this review from blistergearreviews.com:
http://www.blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/follow-up-atomic-tracker-16-salomon-guardian-16-at-binding

"A fully rockered AT sole, however, such as a SCARPA Maestrale or Dynafit Mercury, is not compatible. (Rockered AT soles are compatible with the Marker Duke.) Such boots have massive friction against the Tracker 16?s AFD, and the toe does not fully enter the binding. If you really need a rockered AT sole to fit into the Tracker, be prepared for significant grinding to the boot sole. This is best done by a bootfitter with the correct tools."

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 17, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I picked up these boots mid-season last year and have quite a few days on them. As advertised, they are good and stiff for a touring boot. nice lateral power transfer, doesn't feel like they are over-powered by bigger skis (I'm on Armada JJ's, 115mm underfoot).
They are VERY light. I'm more than impressed. They only boast 30 degress of rotation, but I found that these boots have plenty of rotation, and I have a longer-stride skinning style which usually requires more rotation (as I've read multiple times, don't get too worried about degress of rotation).

My only quips with the boot is that it doesn't necessarily fit my foot the best. I have a wider foot, and from what I've gathered, other people have found that these boots fit narrower than, say, Scarpa Maestrales.
Also, and this isn't always prevalent, the cuffs will catch a bit when I'm skinning. This doesn't really affect performance, but it's slightly annoying.

As other reviews will mention, the plastic on this boot (Pebax) is soft, so be careful that you have the front cuffs in correct alignment when tightening the buckles, being as the plastic will deform fairly easy if you're not careful.

Overall, I'm pretty stoked on these

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote an answer about on February 17, 2013

I'd have to agree with Bill based on my own experience. These are probably in the 110-120 range, although if you're comparing them to a stiff alpine boot, you will certainly notice a difference (as you would with any AT boot).
Here's a link to a really good review/discussion of this boot, as well as a discussion of the difference between AT and Alpine boots in general (the meat of the discussion is in the comments section):
http://www.wildsnow.com/6499/dynafit-titan-ul-review/

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on February 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

This is a proxy post (I've never worn this, but I received this feedback:
"I spent hours reviewing women's coats, hoping to buy one that was
down-filled, yet not so puffy as to make me look like the Michelin man. I
also wanted a hood and lining at the cuffs of the sleeves as well as for
the length of the jacket to fall below my butt but above my knees. This
coat had all of those features. I ordered the Marmot Montreal in medium (I
am 5'6", 130 lbs) and it fits perfectly. It hits mid-thigh, is not too
tight in the shoulders of too short in the sleeves. I have paired a zip up
with a leather jacket, and the coat still fits well over the many layers. I
am amazed at how lightweight the coat is (and compactable, too), yet it
does the job keeping me warm in 20 degree temperatures and below. This coat
is well worth the money and I hope to have it for the next 10 years! (I
would caution short/petite women to take into account the length of the
coat when buying: if you are hoping for it to hit you mid-thigh, it will be
longer and could potentially look/feel overwhelming on a smaller frame"

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on January 17, 2013

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I definitely like these gloves. I bought them for hiking so that I wasn't sweating out my warm pair, but lately Ive been wearing them on both the up and down.

They did a pretty good job of impregnating the leather- unless you're punching your hands in the snow while going up a chute or something, they stay pretty dry. And even though I wouldn't call these warm gloves (my hands do get cold pretty easily), they do a pretty good job considering they're not that thick.

My only grip would be that the stitching began to pull apart after two uses on one of the gloves. But it hasn't gotten worse after a decent amount of use, and it was only the outer stitching, meaning the inner membrane has stayed intact

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on November 30, 2012

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

My review will basically echo everything which has already been said, but these are easily one of the best pow skis I have ever ridden. They may be THE best in fact. I rode them for a large part of the La Nina season two years ago, and I couldn't have asked for a better ski. It is completely impossible to sink the tip- never even felt close to doing so. But like other people have said, the most surprising/impressive aspect was their groomer performance. The ELP rocker is completely legit, and if you look at 4FRNT, Blizzard, and a few other brands, you'll see that other companies are seeing the benefits of a full, low -profile rocker design.
The only thing I question is why I don't still have these skis...

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Cory Akin

Cory Akin wrote a review of on March 1, 2012

5 5

I've always gone with cheaper pants, but having worn these for most of this current season, I'm hooked to owning a legit, quality pair of pants. Aside from the obvious benefits of Gore-Tex, and the fact that these are constructed really well, I am the most impressed with the fit. I went with the large as the sizing chart indicated (34-36 waist), and other than a little bagginess in the waist, which is easily remedied with a belt, these fit perfectly. Patagonia has designed these really well to have the right amount of bagginess for a freeride pant but to not feel like garbage bags. To be honest, I bought a pair of 100 dollar pants right before these, and after trying the Powder Bowls on once, I returned the cheaper pair immediately.

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