Corey H.

Corey H.

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Corey H.

Corey H. wrote a review of on January 24, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

After 4 days of 15 miles/day my body was exhausted, and this little sucker inflated with ease each night to lull my sore body to sleep. Coming from a closed cell foam pad, there is no comparison. Never once did the pad deflate so I felt the ground. I was literally sleeping on a cushion of air the whole night and was so comfy.

This thing packs down and could literally fit inside of a nalgene!

As long as you are on a fairly level ground you shouldn't have any issue with sliding off.

Highly recommend.

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Corey H.

Corey H. wrote a review of on January 24, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I have only used this pack once, but it was enough to convince me of it's superiority!

The air frame is super nice when it gets warm...say good bye to sweaty backs. My last pack was a 5+ pound dana design top loader with a fairly hefty hip belt. This pack's belt is much simpler but in no way does it sacrifice on comfort. Being that the pack weighs a scant 3.5 pounds sure helps too! Just picking it up while its empty, you have to wonder if it is going to hold up, and it does!

The curvature of the wireframe does make packing a little weird. Where the frame peaks out, it almost separates the load up and down sometimes causing tension in the outside pockets if you have it packed tight, but it is not really a problem.

Inserting the Camelbak bladder was a little difficult because the wireframe kind of squeezes the bladder in it's holder, but also, not a deal breaker.

The variety of pockets on the pack is super helpful for separating gear and making it easy to get out the things you need when you need them.

I am super happy with this guy!

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Corey H.

Corey H. wrote a review of on January 24, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I am an OCD researcher when it comes to gear. I settled on this jacket over the Arc'teryx Alpha SL, Marmot Nano, and Stoic Vaporshell. This was the only jacket thas was under a pound, had pit zips, and pockets. The Stoic has no pockets or pit zips, the Arc'teryx has pockets but no pit zips, and the Nano also has no pit zips.

I have recently tested it on a 4 day trek around Catalina Island, and it did awesome! The fabric is super breathable which was almost a down fall. We had super high winds and this is definitely not a wind stopper, but it will keep you dry.

Overall, for the price and features, you can't beat it!

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Corey H.

Corey H. wrote a review of on May 2, 2012

5 5

I was torn between the Fly Creek UL2 and the Copper Spur UL2. I decided that I would love the Copper Spur for the extra room, but wanted to try out the Fly Creek for the smaller size and weight. I figured that if I could live with the smaller one (fly creek), then great, but if not, I'd swap it out for the bigger one (copper spur)...well it only took one trip for me to return it for the Copper Spur.

In the middle of torrential rains, the Fly Creek let me down because of a major design flaw. The Vestibule door peak hangs over the inside of the tent, so any water on the fly rolls in to the tent and on to you/ your bag/ pillow when you open the vestibule to get in or out...NOT GOOD!! That was reason enough for me to switch it out for the Copper Spur and I am glad that I did. There were a few other things that I wasn't completely sold on it either, that the Copper Spur more than fixes.

The extra weight of the Copper Spur when compared to the Fly Creek is marginal, and the packed size is still ridiculously small. This tent also has a much more free standing structure than the fly creek which is great when you don't use the fly. I am extremely happy I made the trade to this tent, and the wife appreciates the extra room (side to side and sit up) and a separate vestibule/ door too!

We have used the fast fly setup as a little shelter on the beach and it works awesome!

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Corey H.

Corey H. wrote a review of on May 2, 2012

3 5

I took this tent on a 2 week Mountain biking road trip. While in Moab, we got some very very long heavy rain and I was able to put this little guy to the test.

Having to set up a tent in the rain is always something to consider and with the extra stakes required to pull the corners out to make use of the full interior, it took longer than I wanted. But it was for the most part easy to set up. Once set up, it was pretty solid and handled the winds very well and kept the water out for the most part.

The problem came when having to get in or out of the tent. When you open the rain fly to get out of the tent, all of the water that was on top of the fly, runs straight down and in to the tent, on to your sleeping bag or gear!! This was a HUUUUGE disappointment!!! Having to get up in the middle of the night while its pouring to go take a leak is bad enough, but to add on to that water coming pouring off of the fly and in to the tent!! That was too much of a design flaw for me. You can see in a lot of the pictures, and even better in person, but the peak of the opening for the rain fly hangs over the tent body itself, and since the majority of the tent is mesh, there is nothing to stop water from running off of the fly in to the tent, while the vestibule door is open.

I ended up returning this and swapping it out for the Big Agnes Copper Spur UL2. At only 10 ounces heavier (which in the ultra light world might be a lot), and marginally larger when packed, this is the tent for me! I will take the extra ounces over getting wet, cramped, and other design issues I wasn't thrilled with. The copper spur has double vestibules and a pole across the top that creates an overhang out past the interior of the tent, making rain run off from the fly in to the ten impossible. Also, the fast fly set up for the Copper spur is so much more useful.

I think this tent is great and could be considered a 1 man. I never did have two people in it, but it would definitely be tight to put two people in there. Another reason I like the Copper Spur better.

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