Corbin

Corbin

Appalachian mountains of Tennesee and North Carolina

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Corbin's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Running
Climbing

Corbin's Bio

Running is a primal compulsion much like breathing. Biking is a contrived necessity for us knee grinders. Climbing tests our meddle and swimming reminds us of ancient struggles. I love it all.

Corbin

Corbin wrote a review of on July 17, 2012

Good stove
4 5

Very good stove. It can be turned down to simmer low enough to keep from burning your noodles, or cranked up to boil cod water in just a few minutes. Used it on an 8 day self supported bike packing adventure in B.C. My partner had a Snow Peak GigaPower, also with an auto ignitor, and we did several two pot meals, so I got a good comparison. My thoughts: Both light easily. The GigaPower is smaller and comes with a little plastic case like the Pocket Rocket (which would probably be a better comparison)and is lighter than the Superfly, but you already knew that. The SuperFly simmers better. We got some onions burn-stuck to the bottom of the pan with the GigaPower, but never with the SuperFly. Both are impressive at full power, but the GigaPower boils water faster. I like the fuel control valve better on the MSR than the GigaPower, it feels more positive when shutting it off, and it folds up better. After a few uses the MSR's pot supports start to warp and become more difficult to swivel together, where the GigaPower's swivels are under the fire and therefore don't warp as bad. The SuperFly has a frightening habit of leaking gas when unscrewing it. I hate to say it, but this was designed to fit pretty much any canister, and it does - we used the Snow Peak ProIso canisters for both - but the one size fits all downside is that it doesn't fit as well as a purpose built screw-on fitting. If you are quick you can minimize the fuel leaking when unscrewing, but this trait was unsettling to me, especially when you forget and are taking this down when another stove is burning. Thankfully no fire ball erupted, but think before you dismantle. The final words: Good stove if you like to get gourmet in the woods. Simmers better than some others on the market and starts reliably. Take care when packing up and enjoy!

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Corbin

Corbin wrote a review of on January 31, 2012

5 5

Easy to place, stays put. Everyone has their favorite set, and these are mine. The groove makes a tangible, positive difference occasionally, and is inconsequential at other times. Wallnuts don't make every other set obsolete, but the groove is a nice touch. I climb primarily on southeastern sandstone and when positioned carefully the groove seems to make it stick on the knobbly bits in cracks and move around less while the rope slides through. I have the habit of giving it two or three good tugs to set the piece and I haven't had any special trouble removing them, nor has my climbing partner. Even so, buy a nut tool. You'll need it now and again for any brand.

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Corbin

Corbin wrote a review of on June 10, 2009

5 5

I've been running in a pair of La Sportiva Imogenes for about 6 months - training, racing, you name it. These shoes have a stiffer sole that some, which is great for rocky conditions but make them feel a tad clunky at times. Deep lugs dig well in soft stuff too. Excellent cushioning for extended runs - absorbs shock very well but doesn't mush and let the ankle roll. Lots of mesh keeps things cool and airy. Long break-in period. Be prepared for that. The shoes break in slowly but take longer to wear out. I have a few hundred miles on them and they are going strong. Toebox is roomy and supportive. Visibly bland; you don't buy these to get girls attention. I bought a pair to keep in the closet for the day when I retire my current pair. This is a comfortable, durable shoe with great support. Get a pair before La Sportiva phases them out for something trendier.

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