Hurry & Get It Before Labor Day Weekend—Order With Free 2-Day* by 5PM MT on 8/27
CincyBearcats

CincyBearcats

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • #25862of 20088

Andrew's Passions

Camping

Andrew's Bio

CincyBearcats

CincyBearcats wrote a review of on October 4, 2012

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I'm 6'1" and 165-lbs (tall and skinny), and these pants fit perfectly in a Medium Tall. I wish more companies offered the longer inseam choice. The uninsulated version is plenty warm (with a midweight layer underneath for cold days), and the thigh vents work well for ascents. My only complaint is that the pants aren't particularly durable. I'm a skier, and the lower cuffs on mine are chewed up after just two seasons (and a ton of Seam Grip). I'm sold on the fit, though. I don't need a belt, they reach my heels, and they're plenty comfortable even with bare skin under 'em.

(0)

 

0 Comments

CincyBearcats

CincyBearcats wrote a question about on February 16, 2012

Fill weight and baffle construction

What is the fill weight (not to be confused with the total weight) of this jacket? It's my understanding that the PrimaLoft One insulation is only in the shoulders and that the rest of the jacket is 700-fill power down.

Does this jacket have box baffle or sewn-thru baffle construction?

(0)

 

0 Answers

CincyBearcats

CincyBearcats wrote a review of on January 11, 2012

4 5

I bought this jacket (and four others, including TNF Kishtwar, MH Kepler, Marmot Kingpin, Patagonia Guide Hoody) to try it on, but I haven't decided yet if I'm going to keep it or one of the others. Here's my take so far, though. I'm 6'1" and 165-lbs. The medium is an excellent fit. The fit is slim enough to prevent bulk, but I can put a Capilene 3 shirt and a Nano Puff pullover underneath without too much restriction in movement. I have long arms, and of all the jackets I tried on, this jacket by far has the longest arms. I can reach over head without the jacket pulling up at my waist. The fabric stretches really well, too. I was worried about the pullover design, but it opens really far and easily goes over my head, even when I'm wearing a ski helmet. The hood is listed as helmet compatible, but it's a really tight fit over my ski helmet (Giro G10, size M). It works pretty well over my climbing helmet, though (BD Tracer, size M), allowing me to look side to side and straight up without too much restriction. For reference, the Mountain Hardwear Kepler (size medium) has a much, much better hood when it comes to helmet compatibility, but the super short sleeves were a deal breaker for me. In addition, the Kishtwar's hood is almost impossible to get over a climbing helmet, and a ski helmet is out of the question. The quality and attention to detail in the Knifeblade seem far superior to that of the Guide Hoody, which also suffers from short sleeves. Right now I'm debating between the Knifeblade and the Kishtwar. These two stand far above the other three, at least in my opinion. The Kepler would be with them if it didn't have such a poor fit for me.

(0)

 

0 Comments

CincyBearcats

CincyBearcats wrote an answer about on January 11, 2012

Tester, I think you're missing the point of a jacket such as this. This jacket is designed to be breathable and keep you dry on the inside during high exertion activities, such as skiing or climbing. This is regardless of whether it is sunny or snowing outside. You layer underneath the jacket to get the appropriate amount of insulation.

The softshell provides wind protection and minor snow/rain protection. Expecting a softshell to offer 100% waterproof protection is also a stretch. If that is what the conditions demand, then you're better off taking a hardshell.

(1)

 

CincyBearcats

CincyBearcats wrote a review of on September 9, 2011

nearly perfect for overnight ski mountaineering
4 5

My wife and I each bought one of these packs for a ski trip on the Führer Finger on Rainier. We were looking for a pack which could handle the heavy loads of our overnight gear and climbing gear on the approach and which could comfortably carry skis and minimal gear on summit day. This pack fit the bill extremely well and we were super impressed with its performance. When shopping, we also purchased the Arc'teryx Arrakis 65 and Osprey Atmos 65. The Arrakis doesn't compress at all when mostly empty, and the Atmos cannot handle skis. The TNF Prophet, however, does both extremely well. Even when the pack is mostly empty, the A-frame carry for skis is very stable and the skis don't flop around much at all. The frame sheet (back panel) is simple to remove and re-install, and the same goes for the pack's lid. We shed both on summit day to trim the pack's weight. The crampon pocket worked really well. On the approach, the pack handled 50 to 60-lb loads better than expected and remained comfortable. I have only two complaints about this pack: 1) There are no dedicated pockets for avalanche gear as on the Arrakis; 2) The material is more fragile than packs I've used in the past. When setting the pack down on the trail (nothing sharp or out of the ordinary), I tore a hole in the bottom of my pack during just its second trip (later in the summer), so I'll have to exchange it with BC.com. I'm 6'1", 160-lbs, and the medium fits me. My wife is 5'4", 115-lbs, and the small fits her.

(0)

 

0 Comments

CincyBearcats

CincyBearcats wrote a question about on April 18, 2011

I'm looking for a pack to use for multi-day ski mountaineering trips. The pack must be able to carry a large load on the approach to base camp, but it must also be able to compress down to a reasonable size for the summit push. It needs to carry skis well, and it would be nice if it could keep my avalanche gear in a convenient location. Does this pack meet all or most of these needs?

(0)