Christopher3000

Christopher3000

Salt Lake City, UT

Christopher3000's Bio

I like to ski and run and ride my bike and climb and play with cats.

Christopher3000

Christopher3000 wrote a review of on April 22, 2013

4 5

After a couple months of trying to make the Sense Mantra my go-to shoe, the shoes have been causing me what felt like the early symptoms of plantar fasciitis. I've never had anything like PF before, having put in big weeks of trail running all spring/summer/fall for three years, so I felt something was wrong with the shoes.

Scouring the internet for reviews of the Sense Mantra, I found that several folks downsized a half- or full-size from their normal shoe size, and the discomfort I felt in my own pair made more sense. Despite being a size 12 in every shoe I've bought since I was 14, including in a couple different Salomons, these shoes are longer than they are advertised to be. I resized to an 11.5 and not only did I get a much more snug fit, but I found the rocker in the sole profile more appropriately located under the ball-of-foot area, rather than just in front of it, the misplacement of which I now associate with the extra fatigue my feet experienced after long runs in the original pair of 12's.

So, still a great shoe, but try them on to make sure you aren't getting a shoe thats too big...

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Christopher3000

Christopher3000 wrote a review of on February 24, 2013

4 5

Overall a happy medium between the Speedcross 3 and the Sense Ultra, both of which I've enjoyed. Super solid construction--in my experience, typical of Salomon shoes--and great fit thanks to the quick lace and "Endofit" inner sock/tongue. The fit is a little higher volume than in either the Speedcross or original red/white Sense, both of which fit my low volume foot very well; however with the quality of the uppers and the effective lacing scheme this has not been a problem.

I was hoping this would be a little more like a stripped down Speedcross than a beefed up Sense Ultra; when will Salomon make a lighter version of the Speedcross??

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Christopher3000

Christopher3000 wrote a question about on September 29, 2010

Hey BC.com: with so many skis featuring rockered tips and tails these days, and with no two rocker shapes being the same, some sort of graphic to illustrate rocker would be very helpful. Skis like the Jimi should be photohgraphed as a pair, from the side, with bases together, to show where the contact points at the tips and tails are, as well as how much camber there is underfoot.

Just a thought!

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Christopher3000

Christopher3000 wrote a review of on September 4, 2010

3 5

I picked up one of these, and I'm disappointed to find its not what is pictured on the BC.com website. The zipper is cheap, so instead of using a waterproof zipper with draft guard there is a cumbersome flap over the zipper with lots of velcro. The main pockets are small. The hood is barely helmet compatible. The goretex softshell fabric feels like an excellent fabric for a resort skiing shell, but the brushed liner fabric is difficult to layer against as it will catch on anything made of wool or fleece.

Overall its not a bad peice but its not what i expected and I'm not sure I'm going to keep it. Why does the picture on the website show a different jacket than what I recieved?

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Christopher3000

Christopher3000 wrote a review of on May 19, 2010

4 5

I put a pair of these on out of the box for a 15 mile run today and I'm psyched on the fit and cushion of these Montrails. Though I used hardrocks for years as a general purpose shoe, I've never found a Montrail that feels narrow enough for my B width feet as a dedicated running shoe. These things felt locked down without being overtight from the beginning of the run until I was drinking a recovery Pabst. Compared to my other two shoes--the racing flat-like New Balance MT100 and the middle of the road LaSportiva Crosslite--these Montrails felt almost over cushioned at first. However by the end of the run I was glad for a soft midsole.

One aspect of the mechanics of the shoe about which I'm uncertain is the posting in the heel of the shoe. I have a medium arch and a pretty neutral stride, and although these felt quite natural out of the box, the posting felt designed to push me into more of a supinating stride, and this made my feet a bit tired by the end of the run. Of course, I'm coming from a bunch of running in super light shoes with no support, and a few days in Crosslites, which are truly neutral as well, so I was a bit disoriented in my footwork and I think it may have made my feet a bit sore. Of course, one should expect those things on one's first run over ten miles all year...

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Christopher3000

Christopher3000 wrote a review of on May 19, 2010

4 5

These shoes are an excellent way to force yourself into proper running form. They are designed to provide thin underfoot protection for runners who strike the ground in the mid- or forefoot range, without altering the natural mechanics of a runners foot, the way some "motion control" shoes are. Often, when I find myself "in the zone" on a long run, I space out, my stride elongates and I start to pound my feet a little harder. In these circumstances I pronate slightly, but over time, this leads to tight shins and calves, sore arches, and knee pain. With these shoes, I've learned to keep my strides shorter and to maintain a consistent midfoot strike. Although they hardly seem to have enough cushion for pavement running, I've found that, with extra attention to good form, I can enjoy running on asphalt more than I do with traditional road shoes, which some people suggest contribute to elements of bad running form such as a heavy heel strike.

Unfortunately, at 160 lbs, and with a propensity to find "the zone" for a period on most runs where my conscious efforts at good form start to deteriorate, I find that I'm on the upper end of the weight range for shoes this light. Perhaps someday I'll be disciplined enough to run in them all the time, but until then I'll use shoes with slightly more cushion most of the time.

Also, why no widths, New Balance? These things are much wider than most superlight shoes, which is tough for a guy with B width feet...on that note, it is absolutely critical that shoes as minimal as these fit perfectly. Whereas in cushier shoes there is more padding in the upper to take up little bits of space around the heel and forefoot, if there's extra room in these shoes of any kind, your feet will be swimming.

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Christopher3000

Christopher3000 wrote a review of on August 24, 2008

5 5

blah, I've worn a size 12 in a bagillion different running shoes, and my six pairs of hardrocks have all worked just fine for me in 12's.

Hardrocks have set a standard for what is expected in a beefy, durable shoe for trail running, hiking, and general trail use. I really have had six pair, and although at the moment I'm trying to use lighter shoes, I miss the motion control and the protective hard plastic midsole plate in the hardrocks. My one gripe is that the flap of sole rubber on the toe of the shoes delaminates reliably.

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