Christian Tuttle

Christian Tuttle

Southeast China and Northeast USA.

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Christian's Bio

Life's too short for me to do anything but what we love. Ski, hike, camp, I follow the stoke.

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Christian Tuttle

Christian Tuttle wrote a question about on July 7, 2011

I had the Hardtop XP 2006 version, which I adored, but unfortunately they have gotten away from me. Two questions:
1. The 2006 version shipped with two or three sets of lenses: a polarized brown, a clear, and a grey reflex (I think). Is that true with this new product, or does each frame ship with only one set of lenses?
2. Do these have an extra set of arms that have the attached wrap around elastic. The 2006 version did, and I LOVED that feature. If there is a Gear God, please please let that feature still exist on these.
Also, my details about the 2006 are a little hazy, and may be incorrect. Its been some time.

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Christian Tuttle

Christian Tuttle wrote a review of on May 9, 2011

4 5

I chose this headlamp from Petzl's lineup because of it's pedigree/price ratio, it's flip up red light filter, and it advertised water resistance.
PROS:
The 4 LED's give off a large amount of light. I've found the medium (in Petzl's words "optimum") setting works for most applications, and its nice to have the high ("maximum" in Petzl language) setting there if you need to step up your light output. The packaging boasts 120 hours at the optimum setting, 100 at the maximum. I trust these numbers, but haven't been timing.
The real selling point for me was the red filter which flips up from underneath the LED's. I really value my natural vision at night, so I wanted a red light on my lamp, but I didn't want the extra LED built into the new Tikka2 and Zipka2 lamps. The filter is easy to use, feels solid (won't snap off), and does its job well. It stays out of my way when not in use and I can flip it up or down without taking the lamp off.
The lamp body is free to slide around the headband, but doesn't do so easily. This is nice because the lamp can be moved without moving the elastic, but only if you want it to.
CONS:
These cons are more worries than criticisms. I am not sure what makes this lamp water resistant. I was expecting to see some sort of O-ring around the opening to the battery compartment, but I didn't notice anything special. Also, the hinge feels a little brittle. These aren't real cons yet, rather just details I am going to pay attention to as the lamp ages.

tl;dr Lots of light at medium setting, even more at high. Red filter is super cool for star gazers. Can't tell what makes it water resistant. Hinge is a slightly brittle, but no problems yet.

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Christian Tuttle

Christian Tuttle wrote a question about on January 22, 2011

Disclosure: I don't own NTNs yet. Questions:
1.What's the procedure like for removing/attaching the binding chassis from/to the baseplate?
2. Is it likely that the binding chassis could be improperly attached to the baseplate, or is this system fairly fool-proof?

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Christian Tuttle

Christian Tuttle wrote a review of on January 10, 2011

5 5

Purchase date: June 2010

Reason for Purchase: Because I was entering the Peace Corps in July '10, I wanted a carry-on that would compliment my 80L Osprey pack and LLBean duffel. I needed a large carry-on that could:
- Hold my laptop and a few days worth of clothes for business/holiday trips。
- Carry easily OFF my back when I was wearing my Osprey。
- Withstand daily abuse。

Primary Intended Use:
- 3-7 day vacations and business trips
- Complimenting my other, larger luggage for the long hauls to and from the US

Review after 18 months of use:
This is a versatile, well built, and useful piece of gear. On the 3 day trip over to China from the US, it held all my gear that I needed to use, including clean business clothes. My other two bags were never opened between my house and my final destination in Chengdu, Sichuan. I never worried about my laptop, because it was sandwhiched between inches of clothing. The outer pockets easily organized important documents. The shoulder strap provided ample support as I ran through the terminal of Beijing airport with nearly 80 pounds of gear in 3 bags.
Since then, I have used this bag on numerous multi-day hostel and hotel trips, the longest and most recent being 10 days, including 2 days of strenuous (and slightly unexpected) hiking through Yunnan's Tiger Leaping Gorge. While I had used the backpack straps on earlier trips, it wasn't until this past excursion that I realized how supportive this pack really is. I carried a fully frieghted MLC on its stowable backpack straps for 12 hours of hiking over 2 days with no back pain and minimal discomfort. The weather yoyoed between swelltering and feezing as the sun passed over the gorge's walls, but I had more than enough layers packed away. As my layers got dirty, I just moved them from on section of the bag to another.

My Bottom Line:
I highly recommend this pack for anyone who wants a carry-on with lots of room, no wheels, and multiple, very supportive carrying options. The construction is bulletproof, the design is well thought out, and the zippers are burly. The MLC receives 5 stars because it does what it is meant to do, and I can’t think of any reasonable improvements.

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Christian Tuttle

Christian Tuttle wrote a question about on October 19, 2010

The first question is stolen from another reviewer on another tent:
1. Is it possible to break down the tent body while leaving the fly and poles standing, such as in the case of a rainstorm?
2. How's the fly on condensation mitigation? How's the tent on condensation overall?
3. Is it possible for the floor of this tent (or really any 'waterproof' tent) to loose it waterproofing? Also, is it even necessary, or even possible, to apply a re-waterproofing agent like nikwax?

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Christian Tuttle

Christian Tuttle wrote a question about on October 16, 2010

Questions regarding poles:

1. The specs say one pole, yet reviewer Perkinator mentions "poles" in his review. What gives? Is it one pole, more than one pole, or many segments that join together to make a crazy pole system.
2. Perkinator also mentions "inserts" that aren't attached to the poles. What's up with these? Also, are the pole(s) held together with bungee, or are they free.
3. How's the strength and durability of the pole(s) and the inserts? Are the inserts plastic, and if so is there any concern about durability in super low temps? I realize this isn't a 4-season tent, just asking.
4. How complicated is the setup/teardown for this tent?

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