Chris B.

Chris B.

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Chris B.'s Bio

Chris B.

Chris B. wrote a review of on April 29, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

There are a lot of quickdraws out there now. As much as I wish the right draw will make me climb harder, that probably isn't the case. So really, what I look for in a draw is value: a high quality, functional, durable draw for a good price. Trango's React stacks up comparably to other super plush sport climbing draws in terms of weight and function. The dogbone is burly yet light and flexible. The carabiners have a wide rope-bearing edge yet are trimmed in the right places to minimize weight. They have a large gate-opening that doesn't grab my fat fingers and an ergonomic handle while hanging the draw and clipping the rope. The best part? They're $2-$4 cheaper than a comparable draw from another company. I love 'em.

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Chris B.

Chris B. wrote a review of on March 19, 2013

4 5

The Masai is my go-to shoe for long route when I need comfort and support without sacrificing too much precision. I worn these for a summer of sampling some of the best granite in North America: Grand Tetons, Index, Squamish, and the Bugaboos. They are stiff enough to keep my feet from wearing down over hundreds, even thousands, of feet of climbing, yet sensitive enough to smear up stemming corners and glassy slabs. Even sizing them for a bit of comfort, I was able to climb hard granite pitches (up to 12+) with confidence in my feet.

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Chris B.

Chris B. wrote a review of on March 19, 2013

5 5

The Tenaya Ra performs as well as other established high-end shoes but without the usual pain associated with them. I've worn the Ra on technical thin cracks in Squamish and hard sport lines in the Red. They've yet to let me down when it comes to smearing, edging, hooking, or whatever shannanigans are necessary. They seem to hold up well, too. I have two pairs now, and even my older pair, while softening up, still has full rubber and virtual no seam peeling or splitting. These things are definitely an up and coming shoe.

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Chris B.

Chris B. wrote a review of on August 18, 2012

5 5

Let's face it, when we're in the position where we need to place pro in microscopic, parallel seams, things are kind of grim. But, should you find yourself in said situation, the BallNutz are truly a saving grace. The only other pro that will fit where these things do are pitons, and those require a hammer and two hands. Sure, the BallNutz are a bit delicate to place and, especially after a big force, can be frustrating to get out. But quite simply, they are the only pro out there for thin, parallel cracks. I've used them for funky aid seams and for heads-up trad leads. I have friends for whom the BallNutz have been the key to hammerless ascents of hard aid. In short, if you climb long enough, you'll be glad you have a few on your rack.

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Chris B.

Chris B. wrote a review of on August 18, 2012

5 5

The Alpine Equalizer is an efficient anchor system that does it all. I've mainly used it in institutional settings to set up quick and bomber top-rope anchors for my students, but the Equalizer is also highly useful for sport climbing (as the lowering/top-rope anchor) and for multi-pitch climbing. The Equalizer, while not as simple as a cordalette, basically can do all the same things without fussing over knots. Overall, I've found the Alpine Equalizer to be a useful piece of equipment that makes two- and three-point anchors much quicker to set up.

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