Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW

Colorado. French Alps. Grand Canyon. Alaska.

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Ron's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Running
Paddling
Snowshoeing
Skiing
Climbing

Ron's Bio

We hike long distances. We bike long distances.

Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW wrote an answer about on December 23, 2013

Thanks MD. One thing I need to point out is that it appears that either the size info is incorrect for these boots, or that Backcountry doesn't sell a US 11.0 in the X-ADV 6. When I put size "11.0" in my cart, the order details tell me I've selected US 11.5/UK 11.0. The next size down indicates US 10.5/UK 10.0.

So should I give the ones detailed US 11.5 a go or will they likely be fitting more like a size 12.5? I might be able to handle a boot fitting more like US 12 with an aftermarket insole. Anything running larger than that is almost certain not to work for me.

Thanks again.

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Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW wrote a question about on December 23, 2013

How do these fit? As a reference, I seem to typically wear US size 11.5 in Scarpa backpacking boots and approach shoes, as well as just about all of my foot ware. That said, I have *old* Salomon Active S9 Pilot (Classic XC boots) and Salomon Team Combi (Skate boots) both in a surprising size of 44 Euro/10.0 US which fit me perfectly. Do these new Salomon BC boots run large like their old XC boots?

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Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW wrote an answer about on December 11, 2013

The Kinesis Pro GTX and SL Activ are build using the same BD last, feature the same mid-sole material and both have a full rand. They also happen to come in at the same weight.

The SL Activ is essentially a refined SL M3. The Kinesis Pro GTX is a Gore-Tex boot and the SL Activ, like the SL M3, is not Gore-Tex.

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Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW wrote an answer about on June 26, 2012

Hey mydan122968824. <br/>  <br/> The side pocket design...

Hey mydan122968824.

The side pocket design allows you to route the compression strap over or under the pocket. To answer your question, the reason why someone would want to route the compression strap over a pocket is that not everyone carries water bottles there all the time. It comes in handy for things like gaiters, rope, skins, etc. that you want to have an added level of compression to ensure that they stay in place.

In Europe I carried a 1.5 liter bottle in one of the side pockets for many weeks and that pocket still looks like new. Not stretched out at all.

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Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW wrote a review of on June 26, 2012

Superb x 2 !!
5 5

Where do I start. We have two well used Granite Gear Nimbus Meridian packs. They've been through the Grand Canyon, over the mountains of Italy, France, Switzerland and Colorado. Banff, Jasper, Mt Assiniboine and they still look very much like new.

I cannot believe that someone said anything about quality control, not for a second. That review has not a shred of legitimacy without mention of what Granite Gear did or said about the alleged problem. Every dealing we've had with Granite Gear has been beyond great. They answered all of my questions about these packs before we ordered and then went beyond the call of duty when we decided to change my wife's hip belt out for another size.

Speaking of the hip belts, how many packs are there out there at this price point that give you shoulder harness and hip belt sizing options? How many packs have hip belts and shoulder harnesses that pivot to allow your body to move more freely. We've worn these packs for 5-10 hours a day for up to two straight weeks and I doubt there could be a more comfortable backpack.

Not only well made, but very well designed. This bag takes a bear vault nicely in the bottom and I love being able to quickly zip the pack open and grab something from anywhere inside.

Now I'm working search and rescue I'm happy to already have a pack that is comfortable and rated to carry heavier loads when need be.

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Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW wrote a review of on April 11, 2012

Pretty Nice...but not for me
4 5

One-liner version: I'm returning this because of the way the pole pockets are designed.

I really had high hopes for this shelter and ordered it without finding any reviews or real data. I decided to go for it because of Integral Designs' reputation for past products and their assertion on their website that their designs are developed and refined following extended outdoor use.

On paper the Element 2 looked like an improvement over the Golite Shangri-La 2, which I own and use as a two-person shelter. While the Element 2's specs put it a little smaller inside on the width and height, I didn't think this would be an issue based on the size of the SL2 and the Element was significantly longer. What I really like was the fact that Element 2 has 2 doors and that the inner tent is designed in such a way that the support poles are on the outside of it.

I ordered the Element 2, the inner tent and the ground cloth and when it showed up today the first thing I wanted to inspect was the instructions for pitching it. I was surprised that the included instructions simply state: For questions concerning product set-up, please contact the Integral Designs headquarters. Well, I wrote this off as not being a big deal because this is essentially a rectangular shelter with equally sized vestibules on each end.

I was excited to get this out in the yard and set it up. My plan was to pitch the outer tent first and then pitch the inner tent. Getting the Element 2 up was pretty simple like I'd expected and I even had a 15mph wind blowing while doing this.

Once it was up I knew it wasn't going to work for me, for the following reasons:
1) The peaks have metal grommets that the pole tips go into and they are completely through the shelter. I cannot see how rain wouldn't run down the poles and into the tent.
2) The shelter seems significantly smaller inside than the Golite SL2 and they are close to the same weight, though the SL2 only has one door.
3) Pulling the door/vestibule staking points out doesn't tighten up the ridgeline. The amount you can pull these staking points out is limited by the tent fabric on the low side of this triangle. This wouldn’t be the case if you were pitching it elevated a few inches.
4) The door zippers are of the one-way variety. The Element 2 has small peak vents (with no-see-um mesh) but two-way zipping sure would make it easy to increase ridgeline ventilation or allow for a quick peek out the door.

On the up side: I liked the quality of the Element 2. I didn't set the inner up because I didn't want to remove it from its stuff sack since I wouldn't be keeping it. I was impressed that I could easily get the Element 2 back into its stuff sack. The information I found online didn't list anything as being included with the shelter but it does come with 6 v stakes and a seam sealing kit.

The information about the Element 2 on Integral Designs' website states that this is "Basic weather protection for two fast and light travelers." and I'll certainly give them that. I'll say it's even more than this given the second door. I for one will wait to see if this shelter is developed further. I'd like to see it a bit larger(for two person use) and completely sealed from rain at the pole insertion points.

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Canyonlands - RW

Canyonlands - RW wrote a review of on January 29, 2012

Nice but Not Again
4 5

Love the fit, hate the grip. That's the short version.

I bought these (exact same model) back in July of 2006 and they've been begging to be replaced for a couple of years now. The boots I wore extensively before these were the Italian made Vasque Sundowner but when production of the Sundowner moved to China that boot never fit me as well so I moved on.

I was happy to find another GoreTex, full-grain leather boot that fit well in the Asolo Power Matic 200 but within the first few months of use I was missing the grip of the Sundowner and from there the grip of the Asolos slowly went down hill.

I put a lot of miles on my hiking boots and the Power Matic 200s haven't held up as well as the boots they replaced. Just over 5 years, with a few years of me slipping and sliding is not going to let me consider these again. I give them 4 stars rather than 3 because they are very comfortable and a more fair weather hiker on dry trails will have little or nothing to complain about.

I will move onto Zaberlan, Scarpa, etc.

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