Byron Go

Byron Go

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote an answer about on February 7, 2012

Thermatek is the Bird's trademark name for taking Polarguard Delta insulation, and then dipping it in DWR, and then LAMINATING it to the face fabric. It's spendy because it's just as labor intensive as it sounds, and no one else does anything like it. And...you won't be disappointed in its warm for weight, and the snugger you wear it, the higher the heat.

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote an answer about on February 7, 2012

Thermatek is the Bird's trademark name for taking Polarguard Delta insulation, and then dipping it in DWR, and then LAMINATING it to the face fabric. It's spendy because it's just as labor intensive as it sounds, and no one else does anything like it. And...you won't be disappointed in its warm for weight, and the snugger you wear it, the higher the heat.

(0)

 

Byron Go

Byron Go wrote an answer about on February 7, 2012

Thermatek is the Bird's trademark name for taking Polarguard Delta insulation, and then dipping it in DWR, and then LAMINATING it to the face fabric. It's spendy because it's just as labor intensive as it sounds, and no one else does anything like it. And...you won't be disappointed in its warm for weight, and the snugger you wear it, the higher the heat.

(0)

 

Byron Go

Byron Go wrote a review of on January 26, 2012

4 5

Love the fabric, super downproof, breathable, sheds light moisture well, all of that.
-actually, after wearing it for a while under and over layers, I've found that I can still snag down out of it on a daily basis. Annoying, especially when it's poking some part of you or having you imagine there's something poking.
Love the fit, typical TNF, I'm a medium, 5'11", 42" chest, 180lb, no prob.
-actually, I tried on the Small a little bit later, and it totally fits me better! Sleeves are long enough, fit is tighter and snugger, much more like my Arc'teryx Solo jacket. I prefer the tighter fit, the looser jacket was fine, but this size for me is better.

Love the hem drawcords, never had hidden ones (in pockets) that worked so well.

Even love the two-way zipper, great for belays and for sitting down so the jacket doesn't bunch up. For those who have a hard time zipping it, don't try to force it. If it's sticking, start over again.

The quibble is this. My arms are pretty sensitive to inside stitching, such that most softshells just don't work for me. The fabric is too chunky and rubs when I move. Notable exceptions are the welded Backcountry/Stoic coats and my trusty Gamma MX hoody.

In this case, there IS a full seam running down the entire sleeve, and while it didn't bother when I used the jacket as an outer layer (the sleeves were roomy enough to not rub), when I put it under a shell, that seam rubbed all day long.

So I know it's a weird thing, but when you're out all day in the freezing cold and your jacket keeps rubbing you the wrong way...well, it can get tiresome.

Lots of great thought and features, TNF, but that is a bad detail to overlook especially at this SUPER high pricepoint.

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote an answer about on January 26, 2012

Alright. From one outdoor professional who was a technical representative for a major Canadian outdoor company to y'all...

Down (the only material we didn't utilize, ironically) is fantastically breathable. Contrary to popular belief, breathability has nothing to do with how much air passes through something, but rather moisture transfer, in the form of vapor. But we're not just talking about down here, we're actually MOSTLY talking about the face (and interior) fabric of the jacket. And while the down is breathable, the face fabric may not be. It has to be VERY tightly woven to effectively be "down-proof," keeping the feathers from poking out all over the place, but unlike a waterproof shell, it does not have to have a laminate or coating on it.

So relative to your rainshell, your down jacket will be much more vapor permeable (breathability, remember?) But relative to a primaloft puffy, or even a plain wind jacket? Pretty comparable. Next to a fleece, no contest. The fleece is totally porous.

To answer this specific question...they'll both be equally breathable. 900 fill down is a marketing feature, you won't notice the difference between the fill power, you'll notice the difference between HOW MUCH DOWN is actually in your jacket. Of course, no one tells you that :)

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote a review of on December 21, 2011

5 5

And FIT it does! I love mine already!

I sized same as my street shoe, this is my first downcambered climbing shoe (first that doesn't totally crunch my toes!) and I think next time I might go a half size down.

Shaman - 12, for reference, I wear a 10.5 in the Demortos.

The feel is phenomenal. Everything works as it should, rubber is sticky, velcro adjusts well, etc.

But the gimmicky bits, that Knucklebox and the Love Bump...WOW that is what allows me to fit in these shoes, and fit SO well.

Taking out the dead space underneath the toes, and giving my long toes space to crimp upwards without 6 months of break-in has been a JOY.

I love 'em. So glad I decided to give them a try.
Demortos will still be my multipitch and trad shoe, but these are going bouldering with me fo' sho.

Enjoy!

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote a review of on May 4, 2009

4 5

For backcountry skiing and mountaineering, this is great. But if you're trying to use it for any sort of casual use, it's very much overkill. It is durable like the skin of a rhino, and beautiful to behold, but lacks some basics, like compression straps. The 40 also withholds on a zipper to the main compartment, so you only have rolltop access. 50 and 65 have main side zip. It will last forever, but you definitely have to make compromises when you get a pack that is this directed in its purpose.

It looks beautiful, but just make sure you buy this for the right purpose and reasons.


The ACT fabric will stand up to the worst abuse, the backpanel and fit are easily dialed, it will carry anything short of an elephant with applomb, and construction is...flawless.

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote an answer about on May 4, 2009

Umm...I think the question was about compressing the load, not load lifter or load bearing adjustment. The two sets of straps Andrew mentioned are for making the load sit better on the shoulders/hips. Compression straps are for taking up slack in the bag in the case it isn't full. There are straps on the side that could be used for compression, but are really meant for holding skis and other things on the sides. If this pack isn't full, it will not compress down as well as the Naos series.

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote a review of on May 4, 2009

4 5

With more coverage than the Stingray, the Scorpion is a nice bet for a warmer hardshell. Unfortunately, I've found that due to the heavier, higher loft fabric, that I can feel the sleeves and the pitzips under my arms. Not a problem with the Stingray. This will be updated and reflected in next Fall's line, where they will mix the high and low loft fabrics for better movement. The fit of this coat in the body is definitely roomier than the Ascent line, so choose accordingly.

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote a review of on May 4, 2009

3 5

This jacket makes you look like a football linebacker. Admittedly, it helps with range of motion when moving your arms for belaying, but for all other situations, it just looks like you're wearing pads. The problem is that they gave you room, but also gave you bulk. Thermatek works wonders and is basically waterproof, and is warm and light as hell, but for any other practical use, the jacket is laughable as anything close to a casual piece. I'd stick to the Solo, which alternatively has a very close Euro fit, (closer than most Arc'teryx, but true to sizing) and is one of the best pieces I own.

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Byron Go

Byron Go wrote a review of on May 4, 2009

5 5

This jacket will be overkill for most, and was made for the most demanding of athletes and conditions. That does mean that it will easily deflect rain and almost anything nature or you can throw at it. It is heavier than the Alpha LT and Beta LT, so question how much you will abuse it. The new LT fabric will be fine for 99.9% of people. Rest assured, this jacket will look new for nigh upon a decade of use, due to the quality of the fabric and construction. When looking to buy, ask yourself if you want to be able to stow the hood, if you use your pockets for your hands (then don't get this), and if you want the low back (for coverage) and high front (for a climbing harness). The Theta and Beta are decidedly more practical for most. But this jacket is like a WRX STi...not practical for most, but still decidedly badass.

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