Brody

Brody

Utah's Wasatch Mountains

Brody's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Skiing
Climbing

Brody's Bio

Volunteer Coordinator for brodyleven.com and the @brodyleven Instagram and Twitter accounts. Professional backcountry skier. Writer. Tourist.

Brody

Brody wrote a review of on November 22, 2013

Yes
3 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

boa liner: actually pretty neat. no complaints. but, also totally unnecessary. assuming you care about comfort while touring. i've heard that when they break, they are very difficult to field repair.
weight: slightly outdated for a 3-buckle boot. i'd be more inclined to go to a TLT or something similar, which I believe would perform just as well.
buckles: solid. i really like them.
walk more: not super easy to trigger all the time, but usually works just fine.
on/off: easy to put on and off with pull tabs and the liner.
walkability: there're better out there, but there are also much worse out there.
soles: great, durable, grippy vibram.
I very much see these boots as filling an important void between your first pair of touring boots (which are bound to be some ridiculous 5-buckle heavy monsters to use with your Dukes or whatever), and your third pair of touring boots (which are going to be lightweight, proper, and actually a good decision). In that vein, I would put these in the same category as the Dalbello Sherpa.
Oh yeah, and I've spent a week park skiing with these things in regular DIN bindings. That may or may not have been a mistake.
Overall, they're great boots. Really. But, at the same time, they kinda suck.
I would recommend them to all of my friends using the BD Quadrants or whatever the other heavy boots are called. But to someone using a Dynafit or Scarpa boot, I'd probably recommend that they keep what they have.
These walk better than they ski. And I rarely object to that concept. But given their weight, I'd expect the opposite.

(2)

 

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Brody

Brody wrote a review of on November 20, 2013

I use it for WHAT!?
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I chose this helmet because of its weight and simplicity. No other reasons. It is skate-style in its simplicity, which I want. There are no heavy vent do-dads, adjustable this-or-thatters, etc. It is a brain bucket, straight up.
My goggles fit underneath it, which I prefer. I like to sag my goggles, which it allows, without a gaper gap, too.

It doesn't make me feel like I have a huge head. I'm only a medium, when I'm normally a large or XL, with goggles and a facemask underneath. That's a nice ego boost.

It's been through a lot. I've taken it all over the world, and it is STILL rockin'. To be honest, that's saying a lot, because there is no good way to travel with ski helmets.

The matte colors are awesome. I hate the shiny helmets that get scratched easily and start to look awful. This isn't one of them. Great surface for sticking stickers about how rad you are, too.

Earflaps remove cleanly, which is a bonus.

It's light. Like, as like as the Smith Maze light. There are virtually no other ski helmets in this category.

I'd like it lighter. Like, as light as possible. Even lighter.

I've used it primarily with sunglasses or Zeal goggles. I haven't tried it with other brands of goggles. But let's be honest, I skin what I ski, so I'm pretty much only wearing sunglasses, ever.

Yeah, I ski the resort with this, and ride through the park with it, and would even hit a handrail with it...BUT...
What you wouldn't guess from the above is that I use this helmet for: SKI MOUNTAINEERING.

(2)

 

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Brody

Brody wrote a review of on November 19, 2013

Around the world, still kicking
4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: Runs small

For almost a year, I've kicked the living daylights out of this jacket. It has skied off the summit of Denali, hitchhiked on sailboats in Iceland, gotten pummeled with waterfalls while rappelling on first descents in Romania, sea kayaked around icebergs in Alaska, high-fived Jeremy Jones, kept me happy in Ukraine, survived a month of living in a van in Patagonia, and still keeps me dry. I think that the chest pockets have zippers that are too stiff, causing you to get "pregnant-belly" all too frequently, which is only made worse by wearing a beacon beneath it. It is longer in back than in front. The arm pocket is nice. The grey material is stiffer than the yellow. The vents are nice and generous, though they also have zippers that are too stiff.
There are very few pieces of gear that I've tested more than this jacket. Fitting is very "backcountry," so if you're tall or like stuff that fits longer, you're sacrificing your style preferences for quality.
The hood is great, and the breathing holes in the high neck gaiter RULE. Good hood, too.
I'm not crazy about the material--mainly the grey material. It's too stiff. The zippers really don't help that, making you sometimes feel like a robot.

(4)

 

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Brody

Brody wrote a review of on November 16, 2013

When you need it, you need it.
4 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

To be honest, I wouldn't change anything so far. It holds itself very close to your body. I couldn't seem to find a perfect place for my balled-up jacket, which is the size of my fist. There is a few pockets that are "open" and do not have a closure, which I guess could maybe have velcro or something. But the fact that the pack doesn't move around while you run makes up for everything, ever.

(2)

 

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Brody

Brody wrote a review of on October 28, 2013

Compared to the other JB's...
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used pretty much all of the Jetboils. The regular one, in modern-day standards, is too big and heavy for light and fast stuff. The titanium didn't do the job for me, because it was too fragile---it burned too easily while trying to melt snow or actually cook in it. The TI one seems to only be good for boiling water.

But the SOL seems to be perfect for me. With barely any weight penalty (vs. the TI), it is fully functional, more durable, and a good size.

The plastic bottom cup tends to crack, which kinda sucks if you actually use it. But since you probably don't, it doesn't suck. Like, at all.

I HAVE ACTUALLY SEEN ONE OF THESE THAT HAD BEEN USED MORE THAN TEN TIMES AND THE PIEZO IGNITOR STILL WORKED. Actually, it'd been used for over a year and it STILL LIT. Although I've never had any of my JB lighters work for more than a few weeks.

For personal or 2-person light-and-fast stuff, the SOL is the best JB out there. I've taken it all over the world, and appreciate it for what it does: cook, boil, and melt stuff without making me angry for carrying it "all the way up here."

(5)

 

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Brody

Brody wrote a review of on February 24, 2013

Helped Save a Life
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Not many people are likely to come on here and review a product that is meant to keep someone alive in an unlikely situation. Especially not after having used it.
A friend broke his femur while backcountry skiing, and 2 of the 3 partners had these emergency bivies in our bags. Combined with down jackets, goggles, face masks, beanies, food, water,dry layers, and proper care, I believe that these $17 items helped to keep my friend alive until we were able to transport him to the hospital.
They are small and light and I've never backcountry skied or alpine climbed WITHOUT having one in my bag. On the flipside, they are quite slim and with an immobile leg, it caused too much pain to fit over the body. We ended up slipping one over the patient (albeit with a LOT of pain), and using our teeth to cut the other one in half, to be used as a blanket and tucked in around the patient and under his butt. It tore in a straight line.

(11)

 

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Brody

Brody wrote a review of on February 21, 2013

4 5

Think you can't use fitted pants to do anything other than ride the park at Brighton? Think again. The fit of these makes them awesome for everything from sport bars to t-bars to flat bars to summer ski mountaineering on volcanoes in the PNW. Wait, did that not fit right? Well, it's true. They don't fit like skinny jeans, but what's important is that they don't fit like the standard baggy pants that EVERY OTHER PAIR OF SNOWPANTS seems to be. The corduroy material I have tends to absorb water--but not soak through. Just the outer layer absorbs the water, until it hits the waterproof layer and is repelled.

(1)

 

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Brody

Brody posted a video about on February 21, 2013

The summer of 2012 saw a month of my using the Jones 2L jacket around the PNW and BC, skiing everything from sun-baked glacier snow to steep ski mountaineering on a number of volcanoes. Much of the jacket's appeal, for me, is in its fit and features, as I chose to overlook the weight (which is heavier than optimal) on this trip. Of course its bright color isn't afraid to get a little dirty, but it also isn't afraid to handle anything you throw at it--sunshine in BC or incessant rain on Oregon's Mt. Jefferson with ropes and snow stakes buzzing from the impending lightening storm.

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