Brian L

Brian L

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Brian's Passions

Backpacking
Hiking
Alpine Skiing
Mountaineering
Sport Climbing

Brian's Bio

Brian L

Brian L wrote a question about on September 20, 2013

How can Salomon sell a "backcountry" ski without giving their dealers weights to quote? A groomer ski sidecut too? Lame. What do these weigh? (178/188)

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Brian L

Brian L wrote a review of on May 10, 2013

3 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

Comes in at 15.6oz in a large. The pocket this jacket packs into is way too small. I doubt you can fit it in there, and even if you do, you'll be damaging the insulation and it'll loose loft very quick. I couldn't fit the jacket into it's pocket, and I likely would have also damaged the fragile inner lining trying to do so.

Being Primaloft 100g and weighing at 15.6oz, it is very lightweight for that quality and weight of insulation (the lightest weight Primaloft 100g hoody on the market?). If you plan on packing it in another way, then I could see it being a good jacket. However, as is, it's not a very good belay jacket because of this problem.

The shell fabric seems pretty durable, but you'll need to be VERY careful with the lining.

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Brian L

Brian L wrote a review of on March 6, 2013

2 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

These run a little too short unfortunately. I have a 30" inseam, and wear a Medium. They drop down to the bottom of the knee, when they really should be hitting mid or upper calf. They are about 2" too short for normal ski socks. As such, when skiing aggressively (i.e. fast in moguls, cliff drops, etc.), these pants will come untucked from your socks and start to ride up, and your socks will start to droop down into your boots.

Disappointing because I really liked the fabric.

The North Face Boot-Top ones hit about mid-calf and fit much better, but the fabric isn't as warm - not as good of a midweight.

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Brian L

Brian L wrote an answer about on November 5, 2012

I've used this jacket when resort skiing at 40-45 degrees with mild winds with a powerstretch baselayer and was a tad warm at the bottom (no wind) when the sun was out, and just about right when it was cloudy. Powerstretch is in between 100 weight and 200 weight fleece. A baselayer like Capilene 3 would have been perfect in the sun, but the zip-neck on the Powerstretch layer made it quite comfortable throughout the entire day.

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Brian L

Brian L wrote a review of on October 25, 2012

2 5

Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

This jacket is so close to being awesome. Unfortunately, it falls short. The zipper at the top of the jacket is extremely annoying, when zipped all the way up.

If it was designed like the R1, buying this jacket would be a no brainer. Unfortunately, the zipper on this jacket is bigger, stiffer, does not curve off to the side of the mouth, and doesn't have a large enough fabric backing to protect your chin.

As a result, the zipper chafes your chin and it's size is obnoxious.

The hood could be a little tighter too. It's very slightly looser than the R1 - only noticable under a helmet (slightly more bunching).

Bummer. Hoping Patagonia gets this piece right, next year!

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Brian L

Brian L wrote an answer about on October 13, 2012

SOURCE: http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/forum/article-talkback/talkback-breathability-tests-are-bunk-says-polartec/42879.html

Actually, the numbers I've seen are:

Any Gore product (including Windstopper) and a typical hardshell: 0 CFM/25000 CFM (no breeze felt)
eVent/DryQ Elite: 0.1 CFM/30000mm (feels slightly colder in strong winds)
Neoshell: 0.5 CFM/10000mm (no real-world experience yet, but probably just like eVent, except a tad bit colder)
Powershield Pro/Schoeller WB-400: 2 CFM/3000mm (no real-world experience yet)
Powershield: 5 CFM/?mm (can barely feel in strong gusts)
Breathable Nylon: 5 CFM/?mm (can barely feel in strong gusts)
Stretch-Woven/Schoeller Dryskin: 10-15 CFM/?mm (can feel strong gusts and can barely feel moderate winds, can't feel breezes)

Neoshell does NOT have a CFM of 2.

My preferred activities:

Gore-Tex Paclite: Rockies keep-in-the-pack rain item (rainy temperatures are colder, less frequent, and short duration, weight trumps comfort)
Neoshell/eVent/DryQ: PNW/Alaska keep-in-the-pack rain item (rainy temperatures are warmer, more frequent, and long-duration so comfort trumps weight)
Powershield Pro: stormy and cold resort skiing
Powershield: typical resort skiing and stormy and very cold backcountry skiing
Breathable Nylon: alpine hiking/backpacking/scrambling/climbing (usually in the pack)
Stretch-woven: winter and cold spring/fall hiking/backpacking/scrambling/climbing/touring, and ski descents/resort for warm spring/fall

Items used:

Insulated Hardshell: Flylow BA Puffy
Gore-Tex Paclite: Outdoor Research Zealot with pitzips added (7oz!)
Neoshell/eVent/DryQ Elite: not needed in my environment
Powershield Pro: not as versatile as regular Powershield, no reason to own
Powershield: Arc'Teryx Gamma MX Hoody with pitzips added
Breathable Nylon: Stoic Wraith (best breathability and 2.5oz!)
Stretch-Woven: Outdoor Research Ferrosi

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