Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle

Anywhere my feet take me.

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Brent's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Climbing

Brent's Bio

Twenties-something nomad with an ardent passion for the outdoors. I love the taste of high altitude. Prefer to go it solo and minimalist.

Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 26, 2009

As per your three questions:

- There is a ski loop on each side of the pack to allow for side carry configuration (one ski on each side).
- The frame is light as a feather and very durable, but to my knowledge, it is not designed to be removed. However, anything is possible if you're willing to do some surgery.
- The pack is water resistant, but not waterproof. If you anticipate weather to happen while using this pack, an Osprey UL Raincover would be a wise investment.

Hope this helps!

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 24, 2009

Only in the sense that you might encounter some mixed/ice climbing while mountaineering. For simply single-day ice climbing (for example, an ice fall) this is such a large pack, it would pull you right off the wall. Instead of a 65L pack, you might want to look in the 25-40L range. Osprey Packs is releasing the Mutant 38 pack this fall in the U.S. (not available yet on backcountry.com, try moosejaw.com) that I plan to pick up for ice climbing. Osprey's Variant 28 & 37 packs are also good options, but I am a die-hard Osprey Packs fan and, thus, bias. Ummm, some other solid contenders include The North Face's Spire 32 or Prophet 35, Black Diamond's Sphynx, and Mammut's Ice 45. Hope this helps and best of luck out there!

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 23, 2009

Hey, I have not used this pack to carry skis, and someone else needs to weigh in on this question, but I think you should check out one of Osprey Packs' newest offering, the Kode series:

http://www.ospreypacks.com/Packs/KodeSeries/

I think the Kode 22 would be absolutley perfect for what you want a pack for, so make sure you check out its features. Backcountry.com does not currently offer this new series, so check out other online retailers if you need it soon. Best of luck and hope this helps!

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 23, 2009

Yeah, if you're looking to keep cost/weight down, I prefer the Therm-a-Rest Ridge Rest pad over the Z-Lite. Although the Z-Lite supposedly has more thickness, the construction of the Ridge Rest is far more durable. Honestly, though, if it were up to me, I would opt of the Therm-a-Rest ToughSkin self-inflating pad. Although you'll have to shell out more coin and deal with more weight, the added comfort you would get from sleeping on the ToughSkin would make it completely worth it, ESPECIALLY with you being a side sleeper. That, and the ToughSkin is designed to handle rough surfaces like concrete. Hope this helps!

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 23, 2009

You might be able to, but Osprey Packs actually makes a line of backpacks specific for 'snowplay.' I think the Kode 22 or 30 bags would be perfect for what you're looking for. Although backcountry.com does not offer these new packs at this time, you can find them for sale elsewhere online. In the meantime, check out the different models at Osprey's website:

http://www.ospreypacks.com/Packs/KodeSeries/

Osprey makes great packs and you'll like yours, whatever you decide. Hope this helps!

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 16, 2009

Adventure Medical's website states that this bag is in fact 'Waterproof, Windproof, and Warm,' but I wouldn't count on staying dry in a downpour. The difference between this and the AM Heatsheets Emergency Bivvy is that this version is supposedly more durable (with the aforementioned qualities), and 30% stronger than the other model. Aside from being half the price, however, the other model is half the weight and reflects more body heat, making it warmer. I have the Heatsheets Emergency Bivvy and can say that it stands up to some abuse. In my opinion, go for the Heatsheets version--this one just isn't worth the loftier price tag.

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote a review of on August 16, 2009

5 5

Listen, if you're looking to backpack in comfort and do some 'gourmet' cooking, pick yourself up a good aluminum cookset. Aluminum isn't too much heavier than titanium, doesn't develop hot spots as much, and is more efficient at heat transfer. Just make sure you get your aluminum coated, or you'll end up with some nasty residual flavors. GSI Pinnacle series is an example of a rockstar backcountry kitchen setup.

No, titanium is for those of us who scrutinize every ounce of gear. Titanium pots are PERFECT for ultralight enthusiasts who really only need to boil water for drinking or for freeze-dried deliciousness. And when it comes to titanium cookware, I vote that Snow Peak is the tops: light, well-made, and durable. I use the Trek 1400 set for trips involving 1-3 hikers, and the Trek 900 set for solo jaunts. Even better, the 900 fits well inside of the 1400 and there is still room for a canister, stove, and more (backcountry.com even sells these two cooksets together in a combo). And even though I use it mainly for boiling water, if you decide to use your pot as a serving dish, you can easily wash off titanium to a taste-free clean.

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 16, 2009

Right now, the TNF Catalyst 60 pack is on sale for $195 (50% off, regularly: $388.95). The sale price puts it below the cost of this pack, and the more comfortable Catalyst 60 would be darn near perfect for a 3-day hike--or if packed right, a week-long jaunt. Don't get me wrong, the Prophet is an excellent rucksack, but the Catalyst and Primero lines are more suited for extended stays on hiking trails.

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Brent Doyle

Brent Doyle wrote an answer about on August 16, 2009

Coleman is not a brand listed as having a backcountry.com US-only contract, so I don't think you'd have a problem having it shipped to Autralia. As for shipping costs, you can find that out by adding the item to your cart, proceeding to checkout, and entering the shipping address. As long as you DO NOT proceed with checkout, you can attain the exact shipping cost without being obligated to purchase the item. Hope that helps!

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