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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte

Goat Rocks Wilderness, William O. Douglas Widlerness, Norse Peak Wilderness, Tieton River, and Frenchman Coulee, WA.

Andy and Brad Mellotte's Passions

Fly Fishing
Hiking & Camping
Snowshoeing
Skiing
Climbing

Andy and Brad Mellotte's Bio

Andy born 1997 -- young. Brad born 1960 --old. We are outdoorsmen, goatpackers, skiers, hign mountain lake fishermen and rock climbers. Andy studies for a living. Brad does legal work to support combined habits.

Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on May 15, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

We've bashed 'em, thrashed 'em and trashed 'em. They have caught every fall (and there have been many). They are worth every penny. They are light (kind of), cheap and durable. Why would anyone in their right mind pay more for quick draws? Easy clipping on both ends. No gate flutter. Great for sport and trad. We will buy these again when we need more draws.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on May 3, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I bought this mit based on Mr. McLean's review below. I am glad I did. Warm mit. The goat leather does wet out in Cascade pow, but my hands stay dry with and without the liner. I wondered if the wetted out leather would affect the breathability but it does not. The only times my hands get wet are when I take this mit off. I love the teathers. They are really functional and will attach to your shell or around your wrist and you will be glad you did when you are fooling with a binding or a zipper. When using the liner I've found the mit itsel is much easier to put back on by pulling out the liner, putting the liner on, and then sticking your lined hand back in the in the shell. I also like the uniquely shaped liner that allows you to do many things requiring the dexterity of naked hands without removing the liner. Good mit.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on May 2, 2013

Big fish necessity
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Big fish are meat eaters. Big fish will eat their young. Big fish would much rather eat a leach or salamander than a bug. I know this because I have hooked up more big fish on larger streamers than tiny flies--although flies will work with the big guys--especially larger dragon fly nymphs. When I get a nasty bleeder, I can't let it die in vain--so I eat it if its legal. It hurts--but I eat it. When I clean a big fish I always look in its stomach. A stomach pump will not suck out a four inch salamander or leach. You have to perform an autopsy to see what the big guys eat. Sometimes there is surpisingly nothing in their stomach. Sometimes you will see a small pine cone and wonder about pine cone patterns. But usually you will see real meat in the stomach of a big fish, and a streamer like this bead head crystal bugger looks more like meat to a fish than a fly. Want to catch big fish? Try a bugger. Photo of Eastern Brook that agrees the reviews below. Beadhead crystal bugger shook out seconds before photo could be taken--you'll have to take my word on it--I didn't want to stick it back in. Hammered lake near road. Dusk.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on May 1, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If I had to choose one fly to fish high mountain lakes, it would be the Elk Hair Caddis. I hook up more fish in the high lakes on Elk Hair Caddis patterns than any other fly. I would choose the tan if I could only have one color. For size I would have to go with the #14. But since I don't have to choose I carry an assortment of tan in #12 to 16, and Black in #16 and 18, in the high lakes of central Washington State where I live. I have seen fish get real selective in some of these high lakes when the little #16 and 18 black caddis are laying eggs. A nice feature about this pattern is that the elk hair helps the fly float a little longer, especially with some floatant, although I have good luck with fish hitting a wetted out submerged fly a foot or two inder the surface. Perhaps an Elk Hair Caddis is a good attractor pattern. Perhaps caddis just taste good, or are loaded with protein, and fish cannot help themselves. Whatever reason, they work. Umpqua also ties a quality fly that will not explode or unravel after you've released your first two fish.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 27, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Just like the regular Adams, if you want to hook-up, as opposed to just fish, you will need this fly more sooner than later. You will need this fly from desert streams to high mountain lakes. You will need this fly because it represents a hatching Mayfly well and when Mayflies are hatching, fish can become very selective. Hatching Mayflies (at least most of them) sit on top of the water for a minute or so depending on the temperature to dry their new wings before they can fly away and do their thing. The Parachute Adams looks just like a hatching Mayfly (as opposed to an ovipositing Mayfly when you need the regular Adams) sitting on the surface drying its wings to a fish. Often, a regular Adams just won't do during a hatch. I have been fishing with my dad when he has used a Parachute Adams during a hatch and I have used a regular Adams--I either did not hook-up at all, or he hooked-up ten times as often as I. I have also thrown every other fly in my box at the fish during a Mayfly hatch, flies that worked well a half hour earlier, before the hatch, while my dad used the Parachute Adams and outscored me 50 to none. You will need this fly. You will need this fly in all sizes. Some Mayflies can be big and the micros can represent some midges. You will especially need this fly in #18 during a Blue Winged Olive Mayfly hatch.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 27, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If you are going to fish for trout, you will need this fly. You will need it early and often, and more sooner than later. This fly represents any type of Mayfly very well. I cannot remember a river, stream, pond or lake that does not have a Mayfly, or several Mayfly populations. You can use the pattern down to micro #20. You will need #18s for (beatis) Blue Winged Olives. I use this fly in desert streams to high mountain lakes. When Mayflies are ovipositing (as opposed to hatching when you will need the parachute verson) , fish can be selective, and you will need this fly or you will be very frustrated. After you have given up casting in futility you will hang your head in defeat. Don't let this happen to you. Pick up some of these flies now before it is too late. Size down 1 size from the natural (normally) for best results.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 27, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Every fly box needs this pattern in all sizes. My favorite is a yellow size 8. I know, I know, a lot of fly guys and girls will say this is too large. But I think larger makes a better attractor unless you are fishing a hammered stream. Larger floats longer using a dropper. Larger is better for Giant Yellow Stones that are, well, giant. I've seen aggressive spawning male bows attack larger Stimulators in the dead of winter, on the surface. I have seen large yellow Stimulators work exceedingly well as a hopper pattern, although the smaller sizes will work also. In fact, in my opinon, a yellow Stimulator can be a better hopper pattern than a hopper pattern. One of my best memories is the giant sucking sound a big fish makes when it sluuuuurps in a large Stimulator on still waters. Orange Stimulators work very well during the October Caddis hatch as these orange Caddis, are, well, orange. I use #10s for the Octobers because where I live that is the size they are. I have even seen a huge sucker hook up on a #10 Orange Stimulator during the October Caddis hatch, on the surface! I wholly agree with Mr. Collett's review below. Although I like to fish the larger Stimulators, I routinely use # 16 on rivers and creeks as a very effective caddis pattern. In fact, one of the biggest fish I ever lost hooked up on #16 yellow Stimulator. Buy 'em. They are good.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 24, 2013

5 5

I bought this she because it was the only shoe my local sporting goods store sold that even remotely was confortable--I have a good case of Morton's Toe. I sized down a half size from comfortable at the store, had a break in time of about 4 days, and these things have felt like moccasins ever since. I could wear them as an after work slipper if I loosen the strings--they are that comfortable. I like the wrap around lacing that allows you to adjust the heal as tight as you would like for more demanding climbs, and to heel hook with absolute confidence. The are exactly as described. They are a crack and trad shoe. I notice a huge difference when wearing a more agressive shoe. These are not shoes I enjoy wearing for anything overhanging or 5.10+, although, I have seen old rock masters wear this shoe in more demaning climbs well. LaSportiva never claims this shoe to be anything that it is. I am half way through my first re-sole now. It is a great crack and trad shoe that I can wear all day if necessary.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 21, 2013

2 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it

I ordered this rope based on older reviews. I live in an area devoid of climbing stores. Ordering a rope from BC is the only way I can really take a look at a climbing product. I removed the rope from the plastic bag to take a look, but did not remove the zip tie packaging in the hope that BC could still sell it as new if I did noy like it. This rope is made by a different rope company than the old Monster. The old monster I believe was made by Mamut in Switzerland. The new rope located, I think, in the Czech Republic. I Googled the new company before I ordered the Monster, and they appear to be a good and established rope company. I wanted to like this rope. However, I was not impressed with the finish of the rope, especially the rope ends. I know that this rope is fused to the core for the last foot or so, and perhaps this was why the rope ends did not look very finished to me. The rope ends looked like someone cut the rope with a serated knife and finished/burned them with a Bic lighter. The finished cut was some what frayed as some of the core cords were still loose. This may not be good indicator of the quality of this rope, but then again it may. Sometimes the devil is in the details. The finished quality of this rope in no way compares to my Petzl Xion. I returned the rope because compared to my Xion I just did not feel confident about it. I gave it 2 stars because of the rope's UIAA ratings. Some may think this is unfair, but in a sport where your first impression can be your last, I think that people should know.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 21, 2013

5 5

I ordered this rope bag when I ordered a Metolius Monster rope. I returned the bag only because I returned the rope. I ordered this bag because I have seen it in use many times at the local climbing area and have always been impressed with it. I am a Black Diamond fan, but this rope bag is much better than my Black Diamond Super Chute. The Metolius Ropemaster is made out of much heavier nylon fabric than the Black Diamond Super Chute. A rope bag is a rope bag, but prices being equal (the BD is actually a buck or 2 more), this is a much better bag--no comparison.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 20, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

I keep this in the bathroom so it will be there when my rope needs a bath. It brings the color of my rope back from under the aluminum oxide and gritty, sandy dirt. When I am done cleaning my rope there is a greasy, black bathtub ring that takes more than average scrubbing to clean, and enough sandpaper like grit on the floor of the tub that makes me wonder if it will clog the drain--that would otherwise be eating the sheath of my rope. The cleaning process causes me to carefully inspect every inch of my rope. I feel better about my rope and have a renewed sense of confidence in it after a good cleaning with this brush.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte posted a video about on April 19, 2013

We use the releasable version of this binding. We are posting this comment here because BC must be out of them for the year. I (Brad) took a mountaineering class taught by Central Washington Mountain Rescue and the main teacher, a gnarly alpinist told the group he teles with a releasable binding now after breaking his leg on a moderate inbound and groomed run. We wondered if the release would cause the binding to lose is rigidity, but don't believe it does. We are sure the release has saved Brad from another ACL surgery. When it is adjusted correctly, it has never released when we did not want it to. So, if the releasable version of this binding is solid, this binding has to be. Brad never thought much of the three pin addition until it ripped out and bent a hardwire useless on a bomber snag. The three pins got him back down the hill, and it was actually kind of fun. Thee three pins also allow more of a pivot function allowing your tips to ride a little higher over drifts than when the binding is locked down with the hardwire bail when going up hill. Video of an exhausted Andy M. cutting a line after hours on Mach V, a black diamond at White Pass, WA in semi heavy Cascade powder covering the usual icy, rutted moguls.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 17, 2013

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I bought these shoes based on another review that said they worked with Morton's Toe. Everyone is different, have different legnth morton's toes, foot shape, volume, tolerance for pain, etc. The Shamans bumped me up a good full grade over my Mythos. What can you say, these shoes were designed by the Shaman himself. The knuckle box and love bump were awsome--they allowed my cramped and aching toes to flex down for maximum power. The concave curvature of the last hangs on the smallest of nubs and the shoes stuck like I couldn't believe. If I did not have a bad case of Morton's Toe, I would love this shoe. Heck, I still love it. Have normal feet where your big toe is longer than your other 4 toes? Want an agressive shoe that will give you confidence you won't butter off the smallest of nubs? Buy this shoe. I have to give it 5 stars -- Evolv and Sharma can't help it if 20% of the population have deformed feet like mine. Plus, like the review below, they may work for you even if you're part of the 20% club.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 9, 2013

Great Value
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Used all winter under basement climbing wall. Great pad for less--save your cash for more holds. Feels good on top of the cement floor. Can drop onto this horizontally with no Advil needed -- for 53 year old body. I have never once thought that this pad was inadequate for what I use it for, but I am not a highballer. This pad is well constucted from the well designed foam layers to the tough fabric cover. No problems with break in. Seems to feel better to me the longer it is used. Update--used pad outside bouldering on rainy day. Held up well on sharp rock and a little broken glass. Good and comfortable landings from around 6 feet. Bottom of pad brushed off as good as new. Nice shoulder and waist straps. Impressed. Photo of Andy M. pulling down on Bloody Fingers (V4), Vantage, WA, protected by Mad Pad.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 9, 2013

Love my Xion
5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This is an excellent rope. I have the blue 60. It's extra thick sheath gives me peace of mind, and maybe even a little more confidence, before I start climbing. I don't even think about the rope when I am climbing but what climber does? It feeds like butter through my ATC and GRI GRI II. It gives a nice and comforable catch from 4 to 40 feet--and I am sure beyond. I use it for sport, trad and top roping. I have climbed with this rope many, many days in the year that I have owned it. I treat it well but like everyone inadertently subject it to bad rock now and then. I have no complaints about its durability. I find myself strangely emotionally attached to this rope. When I buy another rope, I am going to buy the green 70. I am a Xion guy for life, as long as they don't change it. Petzl did this one right. Photo of Andy M. leading at the King Pins, Vantage, WA, protected by our beloved Xion.

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Andy and Brad Mellotte

Andy and Brad Mellotte wrote a review of on April 9, 2013

5 5

These are the bomb. A thing of beauty. A mechanical wonder. Impeccable quality. Nothing quite as comforting as seeing a C4 stuck in your crack as you climb on. This set gives you a good range to start with, or to double up later. At 53 years old I am not emarrassed to say that they make a great place to rest before that otherwise impending screamer. They are much easier to place than toying around with passive pro when you are pumped out and reaching that emotional moment. Not that passive does not have its place. There is nothing more beautiful than a well placed hex camming its way between the crack. Heck, if was not for BDs predecessor Yvon Chouinard inventing the hex, Ray Jardine may not have invented the cam. Not to take anything away from Jardine, but who knows? As far as cams go, look no further.

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