B Shill

B Shill

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  • #25176of 20625

Blaine's Passions

Camping
Mountain Biking
Mountaineering
Sport Climbing
B Shill

B Shill wrote an answer about on March 25, 2010

No, but I find that stowable hoods are super annoying, and the nice thing about the hood design is that it's integrated with the collar, ie it's all one piece, not sewn on. I like that better because when you have it drawn up and fully zipped, it'll cover your face/chin better.
A good way to keep the hood dry inside during rain is to just let it hang behind, but sinch up the main hood drawcords(not the one that draws the side back, but the one that would pull it down tight around your face. This basically 'closes' up the hood when you're not wearing it and keeps water from getting inside the hood or down your back. But if it's raining I guess you'd have the hood up anyways. What I described is handy in snow as well.

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B Shill

B Shill wrote an answer about on March 25, 2010

I wouldn't rely on this jacket at all. 1K says it all. Most "waterproof" fabrics are at leat 10K or 20K. This refers to the number of stitches per square inch I believe. The tighter the weave, the more naturally waterproof it will be. With a fabric less than 10K or 20K, the waterproofness comes from the DWR(Durable water repellency) coating, not the inherent qualities of the fabric itself. I would only use it if you have somewhere warm to go to every night so it can dry out. As AC said, it'll get wet-out. I'd go with something like Gore Pac-lite which is a lot more reliable and will keep you dry longer. Marmot Precip is pretty good as well, although i'd probably still prefer Pac-lite. I traded up from precip-plus to Pac-lite. Gore Pro would be even better, and would last longer. Basically the better the fabric the longer it can hold out in increasingly harsh precipitation. I'd trust Gore-Pro to any conditions, and Gore-tex Pac-lite to Almost anything.
Schoeller makes some great fabrics too, but I think most are softshell.

Update: If you go to the Gore-tex website, you can click the link to whichever fabric you're interested in and they list every jacket made with that fabric, lots of different brands. Makes it really handy if you're shopping.
http://www.gore-tex.com/remote/Satellite/men

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B Shill

B Shill wrote a review of on March 25, 2010

4 5

Disclaimer: I haven't tested these outdoors.

I have fairly thin, low volume feet, (size 8.5 to 9) and I tried on an 8.5 in the store. After trying on quite a few boots, such as La Sportiva, Scarpa, and vasque, including Vasque 8000's, Scarpa Invernos, and La Sportiva Trango S, among others, I found that Scarpas fit my feet the best. They felt snug and cushy all over with no hard spots anywhere. I found that a lot of the other boots had a hard spot at the back of my heel. Scarpas did not.
I liked the feel of the Charmoz. They felt like stiff, well build hiking boots, as they should. A little less ankle support than others, but they had a great feel and felt firm even when balancing/flexing the toes.
In the end I bought Scarpa Invernos for the warmth, but if i hadn't needed the warmth, probably would have gone with the Charmoz.
Take this review for what it's worth. I didn't own them, but my initial impression was high.

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B Shill

B Shill wrote an answer about on March 25, 2010

I would say yes, but....
Although I haven't seen these boots locally to try them on, They're a double/shell design. Looks like they also come with a moldable liner, which will be warmer.(could also buy an intuition liner, which will add some warmth to the boots, but I don't know how the stock moldable liner would be on insulation.
I haven't seen these on recommended boot lists for Denali, but if you want to be sure, maybe check with a local guide company, AMS, or an outfitter (AMH) to be sure. You likely WOULD need an overboot, unless you were climbing in a great, really warm window. Not sure i'd recommend them for early season climbing (april/may) but again, i'm not super familiar, i'm just looking at the specs. They would probably work really great with room for double socks. I believe these are LaSportiva's new answer to the plastic boot haters so it looks to be a very warm boot. Home this helps some..

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B Shill

B Shill wrote an answer about on March 23, 2010

My two favorite boots fit-wise, are the Invernos and the Charmoz. I found that they both fit very similarly, with the Invernos obviously having more support. I found the charmoz fairly supportive side to side but definitely offer a nice flex mid ankle while still having a firm footbed. ( I believe half-shank? maybe full) I would say, if you love you invernos, the charmoz will suit you well. I found the fit to be similar.

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B Shill

B Shill wrote an answer about on February 18, 2010

This Jacket is great for hiking and being outside all day. As for being on a boat all day long, all summer, i'm not sure Gore Pac-lite is your best bet. It IS Gore, but I would recommend something more like the gore pro-tec. It'll handle the harder surged of sideways water better. That said, I used this jacket on a boat out of Seward alaska just after I bought it and it stood up perfectly to the rain and wind. Had I done that every day though I imagine it might have worn it out by the end of the summer. I've used this jacket for a couple years now as my main rain jacket hiking, camping, and fishing, and everything else in alaska and it holds up realy great. It's starting to feel a little less stiff, like the fabric is loosening up, but i've retreated the jacket with nikwax wash in and it's still going strong. If it's not torential downpours i'd say this jacket would be fine, but if you're going to be out in the rain every single day, i'd get something like a hard shell with Gore Pro.

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