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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillips

Southern California

Cam Phillips's Passions

Biking

Cam Phillips's Bio

WFO!

Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on July 1, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: Runs small

Billabong calls this a relaxed fit, but compared to my normal size in Quiksilver shorts, it feels like slim fit. The two hand pockets are also shallower than I am used to, meaning my stuff doesn't fit in there well. I had to return them (and pay for that privilege). Just one of those times when I despise online shopping.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on July 1, 2015

3 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: Runs small

BC wrote this up as "regular fit" when it is in fact "slim fit" (on the Patagonia label on the shirt itself). May not matter to you, but it does to me. I have to return it (and pay for that privilege). One of those times when I despise online shopping.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on March 29, 2015

5 5

I just ordered a pair, sight unseen, and am super stoked to be getting them!

Where I'm coming from: My only real complaint about my Flak Jackets, even in the XLJ, is that they leak light while MTBing and I find that distracting. Here in So Cal, it's bright on most rides, and leaking light is a reality. Additionally, the terrain tends to be dry and loose, with hella debris coming up from your tires. I've had stuff make it past the Flaks to my eyes. My Racing Jackets solve both those issues, and I have grown to love those, but I still find the lower frame to be distracting sometimes, and they fog up more easily than the Flaks or Radars, especially on cooler morning rides and on longer, sustained climbs.

So I am hoping that the Fast Jackets will strike a good middle ground: more light and debris coverage than the Flaks, and better venting and peripheral view than the Racing Jackets. I should be able to get a ride in with them when they arrive this week, and I will update my review in a few weeks when I have some trail time with them under my belt.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on March 9, 2015

Fragile
2 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I thought I had written a review on this, but I guess I hadn't...

I had been using one of these with a Garmin 500 for about a year on my MTB with no real complaints, and then I upgraded to a Garmin 510. As soon as I put the 510 in, I noticed that it didn't fit as snugly, but I thought maybe the Bar Fly was just a little worn. I bought a second MTB, and another Bar Fly for that bike, but the 510 still didn't fit as snugly as the 500 did. Not a dealbreaker, but puzzling.

Fast forward a bit.. One of my Bar Flies broke at the tabs just removing my Garmin 510 (clockwise as recommended) and then when I went to replace it with my older Bar Fly from my other bike, that one broke taking it off of the handlebars. I removed the bolt and slid the Bar Fly down to the narrowest part of the bars and opened it just wide enough to remove it, but it snapped. That Bar Fly was at least a year old, but the one that broke at the tabs was only a few months old. Overall, I am very disappointed.

I was at my LBS last week and they are now stocking the SRAM Garmin mount with positive feedback from users. Priced $5 less than the Bar Fly, and looking to be just a bit nicer in terms of design and construction, I went for one. The Garmin 510 fits snugly, although time will be the test. I attached a photo of the SRAM mount. I posted a photo of the failed Bar Flies separately on this item page.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipsposted an image about on February 23, 2015

Disappointed

I'm going to have to update my review. One of my Barflies (on the left) broke at the tabs just removing my Garmin (clockwise as recommended) and then when I went to replace it with my older Barfly from my other bike, that one broke taking it off of the handlebars. I removed the bolt and slid the Barfly down to the narrowest part of the bars and opened it just wide enough to remove it, but it snapped. That Barfly (on the right) was at least a year old, but the one on the left was only a few months old. Overall, I am very disappointed.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on January 31, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Not only do these save money, as others have pointed out, and carry five servings, they do it without the what the heck do I do with this sticky mess of an empty gel packet problem. That's where the real money is. Oh, and the Montana Huckleberry is WIN.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on January 26, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

UPDATE: I have seven months and 864 miles on this bad boy and I'm lovin' it!

I was considering a Trek Fuel or Remedy when a buddy let me borrow his T275 for the day. I was hooked.

I was originally thinking I would go with the Expert build, but I really wanted a 1x11 drivetrain, so when my shop's owner told me he had all three builds in stock in my size, I took a hard look the Pro Build.

With the Enve wheelset, XX1 drivetrain, XTR brakes, and carbon Renthal bars, the Factory Build is definitely a substantial bump up from the Pro Build, but for me, the Pro Build was the sweet spot in the lineup. The Pro Build he had in stock had the Cane Creek Double Barrel Air shock upgrade, and as the one I had demoed had it as well, it was a done deal.

The only changes I've made to the bike are that I ran a Bontager XR3 in 2.2 on the rear after I wore out the stock HRII, and I put the bike in the 145mm rear travel adjustment to stay. I recommend both of those tweaks and they are fairly cost-neutral (you're gonna have to replace tires, right?). For the summer, I am now running a Minion DHF 2.3 up front and a Bontager XR4 in 2.2 out back. It is ridiculously dry and loose here in So Cal and that tire combo has been excellent. I will likely keep a Minion up front and go back to an XR3 for the Fall/Winter season.

I'm totally stoked on this thing. I've never had this much fun on a bike, ever. I do my riding in So Cal, mostly Laguna and the Santa Ana mountains. This bike excels in those environs. The Pike fork (and the T275 overall) is everything you've heard and read about. It's a hero maker.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on January 18, 2015

5 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times

Bought one of these on sale on a buddy's recommendation, and I am super stoked with it.

It fits well, breathes great, and offers plenty of coverage without feeling heavy or hot or interfering with my sunglasses. The visor sits up high enough where I don't feel like it impedes my vision, but still offers shade. The helmet doesn't move around whilst bombing through the chunk, and doesn't need to feel tight to do so. I like the adjustment device even more than the dial fit I have had on other lids.

I like the style, too, it has a nice MTB look as opposed to many helmets that look like roadie helmets with a visor pinned on.

Super stoked, especially for what I paid. I just recommended one to a friend.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on January 18, 2015

4 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I like these socks, but they are very inconsistent with the sizing and fit. The black/red ones come up almost to my knees, the black/green are mid-calf, and the gray/orange fit like crew socks (and the fabric feels different, coarser). I still wear and enjoy them, but I'm glad I got them on sale.

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on June 25, 2014

4 5

WAIVER: I don't own this helmet, but I thought my research might help others, as I tried this on several times at various local bike shops. The look, light weight, and ventilation intrigued me and I was ready to shell the big bucks for one. I am a mountain biker who rides some suburban trails from time to time, so I was considering the Octal in one of the hi-vis colors.

First, I tried one on at a local bike shop and it felt light. Comfort was ok. Neither weight nor comfort was a real wow factor, but it was nice. The straps are like ribbons; every detail about this helmet seems very modern and lightweight.

I tried on my Radarlocks with it on, and I had the same problem that I did with my Trabec. The area of the helmet that comes down and protects the temples pushes down on the earpieces, which in turn puts pressure on my nose bridge. No go.

With my Trabec, the straight stem Radarlocks slide in between the helmet and my temples, so I tried it with the Octal. It worked, so that was an option. My Racing Jackets do the same. So the Octal was still on the table as an option.

The following week, I went to my bike shop of choice and tried on a few more lids. In doing so, the Giro Xar immediately felt super comfortable and stood out from all the rest. I tried on the Octal again there, and with the Xar as a point of comparison, noticed that the Octal felt more round than oval, and put pressure on my forehead, even with the correct size and fitting adjustments being made.

I ended up buying the XAR, which they had in the hi-vis yellow I wanted, and since it was my shop and missing its box, I got a deep discount.

My take on the Octal: I love the styling, the purported safety benefits and ventilation, and the very light weight. If it fits you, your shades work, and you have the means (and can justify it), go for it.

I wore the Xar today on a very hot So Cal day in the Santa Ana mountains, doing a 21 mile ride with 3,500' of climbing. I really dig this helmet!

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Cam Phillips

Cam Phillipswrote a review of on March 9, 2014

5 5

Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
Fit: True to size

I am a self-admitted addict when it comes to cycling glasses. Radarlocks have been my favorite style, for several reasons. The fit is perfect, they are the lightest weight (and most well-balanced), the frameless (mostly) and single-lens design provides the best field of view, and they fog less than other glasses I own.

I do a lot of early morning rides, and coastal So Cal is typically either foggy, overcast, or you have a bright morning sunrise in your eyes. Or a combination of all of those as the ride progresses. Most of my favorite trails are a combination of shade, canopy, and exposed sunny areas. The soil is light in color and ruts and other hazards can be difficult to identify.

So I went for a pair these, mostly for the Clear Black Iridium Photochromic lens, and also to try the XL style (not these, I realize), which provided an unmatched field of view when I tried them on.

I tend to prefer lenses in the 15-18% range, and these are a 10%-66% lens. They never get too dark for me, but always provide enough coverage. The tint itself is pleasing and comfortable. It also really helps with identifying terrain (I am a mountain biker, but I road ride on my MTB to build my base and to avoid muddy trails in winter).

The bad: I felt like a total spaceman wearing the XLs. Yes, that is a fairly pathetic (and vain) complaint. So I bought these in the standard Radarlock models, and tend to wear them more frequently (again, strictly a vanity issue). The XLs are better glasses, though, just by virtue of the field of view.

All said, if I could only own one pair of cycling glasses, these or the XLs would be the pair. They do it all, and do it well. I am very happy with these, and recommend them highly.

These are the stars in my starting rotation, which right now consists of my TdF Radarlocks with the +Red Iridium lenses, my aforementioned Clear Black Iridium Photochromic XL Straight Stem Radarlocks, and these.

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