72 Hours Only — Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50* — Sept. 14-16
Benjamin Herndon

Benjamin Herndon

Pacific Northwest

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • #2748of 19817

Benjamin's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Running
Snowshoeing
Climbing

Benjamin's Bio

Raised by a family of metaphorical mountain goats, I would gladly skip a trip to anywhere urban for a jaunt in the back country. Hell, I'd skip my best friend's wedding for a good alpine loop. Sorry Chris, no hard feelings.

--
Ben Herndon Photography
www.benherndon.com

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Benjamin Herndon

Benjamin Herndon wrote an answer about on March 29, 2010

There's no such thing as an all-in-one jacket. Buy the Hercules for the perfect on-the-move, breathable midlayer, and pair it up with the Alpha LT (which is 100% wind and waterproof) when the weather gets real nasty. Most of the time, you're burning up so much, all you'll need is the Hercules (which breaths way better than most softshells). It's a big investment but it's worth it for a match made in heaven. Shop around and you should be able to find them half off at some point.

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

Benjamin Herndon

Benjamin Herndon wrote an answer about on December 18, 2009

They are both midweight base layers. The Merino 4 is made of natural merino wool (more warmth, but dries slower). The capilene 3 is synthetic material, which does better with wicking moisture (breathability) but maybe not quite as warm. Both are good baselayers. You should look into windproof fleece jackets, hardhsells or softshells for an outerlayer, depending on your skiing conditions. A pullover version may be the closest thing to a "shirt" though, if that's really what you want.

Here's a link to BC's softshell buyer guide. http://www.backcountry.com/store/dc/650/Backcountry-Softshell-Jacket-Buyers-Guide.html

(1)

 

Benjamin Herndon

Benjamin Herndon wrote an answer about on October 13, 2009

The SV is somewhat thicker weight material and thus designed for more severe (SV) conditions. The LT is made for lightweight enthusiasts, though still quite tuff (I have one). THe length should be similar between the too. Both the SV and LT are strictly hardshells with no insulation (though they stop cold wind like noneother). The fission is insulated.

(0)

 

load more