Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson

The Northwest, primarily Northern Idaho.

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Benjamin's Passions

Telemark Skiing
Backpacking
Mountain Biking
Alpine Skiing
Sport Climbing

Benjamin's Bio

I was born and raised playing in the mountains, and have made it a life goal to never stop. I like skiing powder more than any other activity, but I am also an avid climber, mountain biker, and backpacker.

Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote an answer about on February 26, 2010

Don't worry about it man. If I saw you in the lift line wearing some Smith Heiress goggles in the South Beach color scheme, I might question your taste, but these ones look sick. Go shred.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote an answer about on February 26, 2010

I've been using a pair with the Platinum Mirror lense for a few years now skiing in the Northwest in a lot of flat light and they've done fine. A lighter lense like the Ignitor Mirror would do better in flat light than my Platinums too. Also, if you're hiking a bunch with your goggles up on your hat or something, yeah they will fog, but I ski aggressively lap after lap and mine very rarely fog.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote an answer about on February 26, 2010

Either one would probably work fine for you, it really depends on what you want to do more. The 177s will be easier to throw around in tight trees, but the 184s will be a little more stable if you're making big fast turns and will float better in the powder. I'm 5'10" and 150 pounds and ride 182cm Volkl Gotamas, the wider brother of the Mantra, and I love them. It sounds like you might lean toward the longer ones for the skiing that you most enjoy.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote an answer about on February 26, 2010

I'm not sure about installing these holds, or any for that matter, on brick. Generally holds like this would be attached to a plywood wall built specifically for bouldering, or to a concrete wall with special threaded anchors drilled into the concrete. A good resource for you and your friend might be the "How to Build a Home Bouldering Wall" book put out by Metolius. You can get that in .pdf form at this link:

http://www.metoliusclimbing.com/pdf/How-to-Build-a-Home-Bouldering-Wall.pdf

Hope that was helpful, happy bouldering!

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote an answer about on February 19, 2010

go with the 169s for sure, they'll be more stable and still be plenty easy to spin with. These skis are meant to be center mounted and are a dedicated park ski, they won't perform well outside the park being so narrow and center mounted.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote an answer about on February 19, 2010

It would probably work, but I would recommend going for a pack designed specifically for mountain biking. They generally will fit closer to your body so that they are more stable and don't shift around as you ride, and also this pack doesn't have small outer pockets, I personally would hate to have to fish around in one big pocket to find a wrench or an energy bar. I would recommend Camelback or Dakine if you're looking to buy a pack specifically for mountain biking.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on February 18, 2010

4 5

This is a great shoe for general climbing. I've had mine for a few years and have bought replacements but I keep putting these back on even though they're worn and dirty because they are so comfortable. I climb a lot in the gym and a lot of mid-grade sport routes and these shoes have performed well. The are aggressive enough to use on your project (if you're not pro) and they are comfortable enough that you won't have to tear them off your disfigured feet after every pitch. The rubber does wear fast unfortunately, but that can be expected from a soft sticky compound.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on February 18, 2010

4 5

I love this pad. It's thick and inspires confidence to go for that big move. It's not super light or super technologically advanced or anything like that, but it's cheap and effective. It also is made to be transformed into a couch back at camp which can be pretty handy after a long day climbing.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on February 18, 2010

3 5

I threw one of these pads down below a route I was setting at the gym the other night and took a fall onto it from about ten feet up. I was surprised to find that it absorbed the impact completely even though it is only 3 inches thick. My only complaint is that since this pad doesn't have a hinged center, folding it to carry is a chore.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote an answer about on February 17, 2010

I've never seen Bacountry stock that particular set, which is unfortunate. I bought the Metolius 30 pack from Mountain Gear and have been really happy with it. Here is a link to it on their site.

http://www.mountaingear.com/pages/product/product.asp/imanf/Metolius/idesc/Greatest+Chips+Bolt-On+Hold+Set+-+30+Pack/Store/MG/item/214266/N/0

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on November 18, 2009

3 5

This movie has a lot of rails, a lot of jumps, and a lot more rails. Awesome skiing, all of the riders raised the bar considerably with this film, but... it lacks any really substantial mountains like you might find in an MSP or TGR. Watch it, but don't buy it unless you're pretty stoked on handrails.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on November 18, 2009

5 5

Stop wondering if it's really worth the money and just buy them. I bought twelve and it is so nice to be able to walk away from my car with complete confidence that when i come back, my whole rack system will be there. And if I want to take it apart, the same key works with all of the components, from my towers to my ski racks and back again. Think about the amount of money you have invested in your racks, plus the amount you have invested in the gear that is held by those racks, and $110 for twelve cores starts to sound like a mighty good deal.

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on November 18, 2009

5 5

I own three of these racks and they currently sit on top of an '09 Subaru Impreza. These racks are simple to assemble and simple to use. I regularly haul around three downhill bikes or a couple of fixed gear bikes with 700c wheels and it is easy to adjust the rack to fit either size. The trays accomodate a pretty large wheel base, my Kona Stinky about maxes it out but it's one of the longer bikes that I've encountered. There is a bit of sway with these racks when they have heavier bikes and the road is windy or bumpy, but I've never had one let loose. The only issue I've had is that the fifth door on my Subaru would hit the back of the middle tray every time I opened it. I cut it down a half an inch and now it's great!

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on November 18, 2009

5 5

I've been really happy with this fuel bottle, it does everything that a fuel bottle should do, and didn't break the bank. There was one occasion on a backcountry ski trip when this bottle was kicking around the bottom of my pack and I could smell a little bit of white gas. Lesson learned, keep it on the outside or be positive that it's upright and you're good to go!

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on November 18, 2009

5 5

I bought an extra large size right before a trip to Moab Utah and used all 9070 cubic inches of space. Just to give you an idea of how big this bag is, I had a sleeping bag, pad, tent, clothes, cookware/stove, outerwear, my climbing gear (including a rope) my half shell mountain bike helmet and also my full face mountain bike helmet, a frisbee, and a slackline. The bag didn't even flinch under the load, and the zippers stayed solid even when they were under a bit of tension. This bag is going to be pretty heavy when full, but if you can wrestle it up, it carries with the backpack straps pretty well, though not for long distances. Buy one and take a sweet-action trip!

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Ben Jepson

Ben Jepson wrote a review of on November 18, 2009

5 5

I used this bag on a few backpacking trips this summer and use it as my couch surfing bag when I travel. It is really well designed, with a lot of little features in the head area that make sleeping more comfortable and keep the cold out. The little pocket and the glow in the dark zipper pull are also nice features that you may not find on other bags. There have been complaints that this bag isn't actually comfortable at 15 degrees. If you do some research on the Marmot site about this bag

http://marmot.com/spring_2009/equipment/sleeping_bags/synthetic/ecopro_15_reg
/info/details

you will come across what the rating numbers actually mean. The 15 doesn't mean that this bag will perform excellently at 15 degrees. The temperature ratings that Marmot gives for this bag are as follows.

Comfort: 29.3F / -1.5C
Lower Limit: 18.3F / -7.6C
Extreme: -13.9F / -25.5C

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