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BAinUT

BAinUT

Though I may be unfaithful and stray into verdant forests and climb craggy mountains, Utah's middle-of-nowhere slickrock will always be home

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Brigg's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Snowshoeing
Climbing

Brigg's Bio

I grew up in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah and, more or less, the desert of southern Arizona. I'm not sure how important a bio is (especially this one), but I'm a hiker and backpacker and have done both since before my introduction to formalized education. That means I love gear, especially gear that works the same today as it did a few years ago, or over a decade ago when I got my first stove before I had the driver's license to get to a trailhead unassisted. Gear is, of course, the stuff that keeps you alive and safe out there, it's also the stuff that makes being out there more comfortable (or not). That's why I believe gear should do what it was intended in unintended circumstances. Gear should also be well manufactured, easy to maintain in the field, and last for years despite abuse and greater than average use.

BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 18, 2009

As per the tech specs to the right, the Laptop Pocket Dimensions are 14.5 x 10.5 x 1.75in (confirmed with Pacsafe). You might want to look at Timbuk2 messenger bags, as they are designed fit most laptop sizes, even the 17". Just measure your laptop and check them against the Tech Specs (keep in mind that BC sometimes only includes the medium/regular measurement for laptop sizes, so just ask if you're unsure about a particular model).

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 17, 2009

Not sure which model you have, so here are two links to the parts section for the two models Coleman lists:
http://www.coleman.com/coleman/parts/ProductImage2.asp?product_id=9941-765
http://www.coleman.com/coleman/parts/ProductImage2.asp?product_id=9941-768

If they do not have the part or parts you need, you might try contacting Coleman directly to see if other parts may be substituted. You can reach them at 1-800-835-3278.

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 16, 2009

The unit comes with a measuring gauge, which you use to measure the diameter of the ceramic filters. If at any point the measuring gauge slides over the ceramic filter media without being forced, the filter needs to be replaced. It is recommended you replace the filters after six months of continuous use, and since this is a high capacity system, you can expect up to 50,000 liters/13,000 gallons of pure water during that time.

The filters can be cleaned with the supplied cleaning pad as well, which you do once you notice a drop in flow rate. You can do this several times over the life of the filters.

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 15, 2009

The only difference between the two is the NH model uses Non Hazardous batteries so you don't need to dispose of them according to your local hazardous waste ordinances (they're a bit more friendly to the planet). There is no difference in operational specifications or useful life between the two types of batteries and likely once all the non-NH models are sold, the NH will become the only option.

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 14, 2009

GSI doesn't have a parts list listed on their site, but your best bet is to contact them directly to see what replacement parts they have available. They can be reached by phone at 1-800-704-4474 or via online form at http://www.gsioutdoors.com/contact.aspx

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 14, 2009

It comes with an iPod adapter, a car outlet adapter, and a multi-link adapter to hook more than one solar array together. It's essentially the same as the Brunton Solaris 6 (http://www.backcountry.com/store/BRU0143/Brunton-Solaris-Flexible-Personal-Solar-Panel.html) but with the addition of an iPod adapter. So long as whatever you have has a car adapter/charger, it would work.

If you're looking for something that will power multiple devices, including an iPod, without having to carry around a lot of specific car adapter/chargers, here is one suggestion (you will need a USB -> iPod adapter): http://www.backcountry.com/store/BRU0148/Brunton-Solarport-44.html

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 14, 2009

Thanks for the update on the method, Jon. You're right: regardless of old or new, it's super secure and easy.

It attaches to the tent and/or footprint's pole grommet/strap system (no clips, ties, or velcro tying it to the poles). You use the tent strap to secure the fly at each pole/ground connection point. You can guy it out for more stability and would need to use stakes on the vestibule.

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 13, 2009

Nope, it should not be used over a fire. Typically any non-coated aluminum or stainless steel pot or pan would do fine over a fire. This pot is designed to work most efficiently with the provided stove system, so the design limits its usability in other situations (e.g. the unique heat transfer 'FluxRing' assembly on the bottom of the pot). Most importantly, and the biggest reason the pot cannot be used over a fire, is the use of neoprene to insulate the pot. Neoprene starts to decompose at 446 degrees Fahrenheit, which is towards the lower end of a typical campfire, even a small one. If you were to use this pot over a wood fire, you take a significant risk in destroying the neoprene insulation.

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 13, 2009

Yep, you can boil a pot of water, though it will take longer by 5 - 15 minutes depending on whether there is a breeze, the amount of water, the size of the pot, etc. You can use a frying pan or skillet on it as well if the handle is oven-safe to above 500F (cast iron works best).

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 13, 2009

To add what Andrew wrote, you will need what is called a "step down voltage converter" (from 240 to 110v AC), which you can find on the internet for $10 - $20USD. You can also use the supplied automobile charger, but that would take some time were that your only charging source.

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 13, 2009

I wouldn't recommend removing the baskets except to replace them. If you're hiking on a hill where the baskets would actually reach the ground from the tip, then you need the baskets. They help prevent your poles from becoming a spear and sinking too deep into whatever sinky stuff you're hiking through. Your baskets will get torn up over time, but they are inexpensive to replace.

If you regularly tear up your baskets on shale or sandstone, there is always the ubiquitous, all-powerful duct tape you can use to wrap around your baskets (before the damage happens). Masking tape, of the non-painter's variety, works well when walking in areas where there are sharp/pointy edges. No, it's not pretty, but it's better than plastic shavings blowing downwind and the resulting cost of replacement.

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BAinUT

BAinUT wrote an answer about on May 12, 2009

You might want to look at the Dakine surf packs; they typically have a waterproof compartment or a removable wet suit bag that would keep your wet/stanky items separate from your fresh and clean stuff. Here are a few examples:
http://www.backcountry.com/store/DAK0787/DAKINE-Point-Pack-1800cu-in.html
http://www.backcountry.com/store/DAK1135/DAKINE-Patrol-Backpack-2200cu-in.html
And the Dakine site: http://www.dakine.com/surf/packs/surf-packs/

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