Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp

Salt Lake City, UT

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Andrew's Passions

Backpacking
Mountain Biking
Hiking
Trail Running

Andrew's Bio

Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote a review of on June 17, 2012

4 5

Unlike other Ruffwear collars, this one doesn't have too many extra features that you wouldn't find on your standard collar. However, this simple design is why it works so well and I like it so much. It's thin, light and looks great. The thin, round profile means that there is very little friction with the dog's fur, which allows the collar to rotate freely when attached to a leash. This prevents the leash from getting caught under the dog's legs as the attachment ring always finds its way to the back of their neck. Others have mentioned that there is a large flat section on the collar. While true, it is a necessary design feature to allow for buckles to adjust the length. It is hardly noticeable during use as the flat section typically rests under the dog's neck and the rope section faces upwards. I like the buckle design as I like to take my dog's collar off when he comes inside. The leash attachment ring is also nice when combined with the Knot-A-Leash or any other leash with a carabiner. It allows the carabiner to rotate more freely and doesn't bind as much as the triangular attachment that Ruffwear uses on all of their other collars. I also like how this collar doesn't have a tag silencer as my dog only wears it when he's outside and it's nice to be able to hear him when we are hiking off leash. I do wish that the tag attachment was fixed like the leash attachment so that it wasn't free to slide all the way around the collar. This collar does have some reflective thread woven into it, but I wouldn't rely on it to spot your dog in the dark. The only downside to this collar (and I can't fault Ruffwear for this, but rather my inability to properly train my dog) is that it is so thin that it can really dig into, and choke, your dog if they like to tug.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote a review of on June 6, 2012

4 5

These are not just shorts; they are a work of art. The more I wear these, the more I notice the attention to detail that was given. The stitching is flawless, which is critical on the Nabbi color to prevent them from looking too clown like. I went with a size large and the fit for me is excellent. I'm 6'3", 195 lbs. and have a true 36" waist but usually wear a 34" or 35" waist (I guess most manufacturers are adding inches onto the listed size nowadays to make us feel less fat). The waist has a good amount of stretch built in as well as velcro straps to adjust the waist. Luckily, the waist is perfect for me as the velcro straps are basically useless. Unlike other Norrona shorts and pants that have an elastic band in the waist, these simply require that you bunch up the waist fabric and secure it in place with the velcro strap. The front of the waist is also secured by velcro, which is nice as it gives you some micro adjustment of the waist sizing. Overall, these have a slim but loose fit. The fabric has a decent amount of stretch and a soft, brushed lining. I have large, muscular thighs and these shorts are a little snug around the upper portion, but the zippered hand pockets really give you some extra room when unzipped. The inseam in a size large is 12.5" and they fall just below the base of the kneecap on me. The pockets are all mesh lined which allows for nice ventilation when they are unzipped. The cargo pocket was well thought out as it is backed with the flex1 fabric to prevent larger items from rubbing against your leg, but still has a small section of mesh at the bottom that allows for air flow. It also has a hidden key clip (it took me almost a dozen wears before finding it) inside the cargo pocket that prevents them from sinking to the bottom or accidentally bouncing out if left unzipped. As I mentioned earlier, I usually keep the front hand pockets unzipped to allow for a little more room. These pockets also have a thin strip of the flex1 fabric just behind the zipper to give them a nice seamless look and prevent people from seeing your underwear through the mesh pockets. It also has one rear pocket that is ridiculously deep (fortunate, as you’ll need deep pockets to afford these shorts at retail price). This allows a wallet or other object to sit below your butt and prevents you from sitting directly on whatever is in the pocket. The zipper pull on this pocket is nicely designed to rest on the side of your thigh when zipped closed, but I have had it scratch up my leather car seats if left open. The only other minor quibble I have with these is that the fabric is a little noisy when it rubs against itself or other objects as it has a very fine corduroy pattern. Also, the technical fabric is water resistant, but to maintain it, you’ll likely want to wash and treat it with Nikwax occasionally. Overall, these are amazing shorts, but unless you can swallow the hefty price (or find them on sale) and the fit is just perfect, they probably won’t be for you.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote a review of on May 10, 2012

5 5

These shirts are ridiculously soft and have a very airy feel to them. These are great as an everyday t-shirt, but also breathe well enough for active use. I have some of the 100% cotton Backcountry.com t-shirts and the fabric on those is too thick to breathe and feels stiff; not so with this one. The fabric seems to be wearing very well after multiple washes and I haven't noticed any shrinkage after drying that others have mentioned. I always dry them on low just to be safe. They have a loose, but somewhat slim fit with a little extra length than your average t-shirt. The sleeves are also little bit longer than your average t-shirt, which is great for those of us with long arms. I have last year's model of this t-shirt which is made with the Sport Science fabric and it is complete garbage. If you were unlucky enough to get one of those, burn it so that no one else will ever have to wear it, and go buy yourself 3 of these. For reference: 6'3", 195 lbs, 42" chest, size XL.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote a review of on April 28, 2012

5 5

Say goodbye to headlamp blindness. This little lantern gives off plenty of light to see everything in your tent. The frosted glass keeps the light from being too intense and allows your eyes to adjust much quicker to darkness when stepping out of the tent than a headlamp. You no longer have to look at the ground when talking to someone either (like you would when wearing a headlamp). The hooks on top make it easy to hang from the tent ceiling and the double clasp is key in preventing it from getting knocked off whatever you hook it to. A single button is all it takes to operate and holding it down will dim or brighten the light. The light blinks when reaching the lowest and highest settings which allows you to easily conserve the battery when you don't need as bright a light. There aren't really any flaws to this lantern. If you are really weight conscious, it weighs 4.6 oz. with 4 AAA batteries, not the 3 oz. as BD lists on their website (the lantern itself weighs 3 oz.). I would try and stay away from the darker colors as they are harder to find in a dark tent or in your pack. If you are car camping, you might want to check out the Apollo or Titan as weight won't be an issue. Other than that, go buy one and you likely won't be going to sleep right after the sun goes down anymore.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on April 27, 2012

The only jacket they make in a tall size is the Alpha SV which was stocked on Backcountry.com for a short while. It is also one of the only pieces they still make in Canada. I'm 6'3" and have monkey arms. Arc'teryx sizing has always been hit or miss for me when trying to balance sleeve length and torso size. Your best bet would be to try some on or take a look at Norrona. Norrona has very long sleeves and a narrow torso (M's usually have enough sleeve length for me, but torso always dictates a L or XL) with similiar, if not higher, quality compared to Arc'teryx.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on January 11, 2012

This jacket does not have a total of 100 grams of insulation. It has 100 grams per meter squared. I assume it also uses the 100g WarmCore in the hood. The 100g Primaloft will be warmer than a lower fill weight assuming the same type of Primaloft, but it will also be heavier. There's not a whole lot of information on the WarmCore as it is proprietary to Helly Hansen. It is used in their "lifestyle, kids and junior ranges", so I assume it won't be as good as something like Primaloft One. It won't be as warm per weight or as compressible, and it probably won't hold its insulation value as well when it's wet.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on January 6, 2012

I also have the Stoic 2.0 and last year's...

I also have the Stoic 2.0 and last year's Bombshell and the fit is completely different. I haven't tried this year's Bombshell, but am assuming it is the same as last year's in terms of fit. The Bombshell is much roomier than the Stoic 2.0. I had to wear an XXL in the Stoic 2.0 to be able to fit a decent amount of layers and not have it pinch at the shoulders and armpits. In the Bombshell, I wear a L and still have room for layering (6'3", 195 lbs). Based on your size, I would say that you would be comfortable in a M. See my photo which compares the two jackets mentioned (Bombshell is on top of the Stoic 2.0). As you can see, not a whole lot of difference for an XXL and a L.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on January 5, 2012

There aren't any more of these being received for this season. Your best option would be to go to www.norrona.com and buy direct from them. They have the Caviar in stock in size XS. You'll probably pay a bit more with the exchange rate and shipping. Otherwise, you'll just have to hope someone returns one and check the site daily to try and catch it before someone else buys it.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on January 1, 2012

There aren't any dedicated snowboard loops on this pack. The only way to carry a snowboard would be to place it between the back panel and your back with the base flat against your back and the bindings facing out. The pack is small enough to fit in between your snowboard bindings. You might want to check out the Dakine Heli 11L for a similar sized pack with a dedicated vertical snowboard carry option.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on January 1, 2012

They are essentially the same skins, but the STD skins do not come with a tail attachment. If you already have a tail attachment, then you have the STS skins. If you don't, then these will work with the STD skins.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on November 12, 2011

I believe the only place to get them is direct from Scarpa. I believe you are looking for the Powerblock Tour mechanism which will run you around $60 plus shipping. You can go to their website and find them under Ski>Accessories, or you could check a local Scarpa dealer to see if they could help you out.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on September 25, 2011

You don't actually use this device to type. You can create predefined messages on the website with your computer or the app with your smartphone, which can then be sent with this device when in the backcountry. You need a Wi-Fi or data connection when using your smartphone to do this as the predefined messages aren't actually sent or stored by the SPOT. It simply sends a message to the server telling it which predefined message to send and to whom. There is also the option to type custom messages on your smartphone (iPhone, iPod Touch or Android 2.0 or later) while in the backcountry and have the SPOT send these messages through the satellite network. However, there are additional charges to type and send a custom message.

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Andrew Philp

Andrew Philp wrote an answer about on September 9, 2011

That is the European style of things (same as women's jackets in the US). I have not come across a Stoic jacket with that before, but do have several European brand jackets and fleeces like that. I don't even notice it when switching between jackets and am starting to prefer the European side. Give it a few weeks and I'm sure you won't have any issues with it (especially if you like everything else about the jacket).

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