AlexB

AlexB

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AlexB

AlexB wrote an answer about on June 30, 2014

Hayes and Ven,

You are definitely not overlooking anything and your assessments are spot on. From the picture that Hayes included in the question, it is evident that the pack shipped with the aluminum stay reversed. The lower section of the aluminum stay needs to follow the lumbar curvature of the wearer, as with the template stay that Hayes also pictures.

It is an easy correction to make, but our sincere apologies for this shipping oversight from our Mountain Hardwear factory. The rectification is to un-hook the lumbar section, slide the stay out of the hipbelt, slide the stay out of the backpanel (easiest to also remove the plastic framesheet) flip the stay around and re-assemble.

Also remember that part of beauty of this pack is its flexible design, which allows removing pack components (i.e. swap the padded hipbelt for the included webbing belt and/or remove the top pocket, frame stay and/or framesheet when climbing with lighter loads). The minimum weight for this pack is approximately two and a half pounds with these components removed and the hipbelt swapped.

Thanks,
Alex @ Mountain Hardwear

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AlexB

AlexB wrote an answer about on April 8, 2014

Chris,

A reservoir/bladder may be carried in the floating top pocket or in the front zippered pocket (though the latter is not ideal for weight distribution). Water bottles may also be carried in the top pocket, front zippered pocket and/or front crampon stash pocket (presuming you're not carrying crampons).

This is a mountaineering pack so Nalgene water bottles are usually carried inside the pack since they tend to freeze at higher elevations if they are outside the pack. Even though it's a mountaineering pack, the reasons you noted (weight, size and the fact that it's waterproof) make it a great backpacking pack as well!

Alex @ Mountain Hardwear

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AlexB

AlexB wrote an answer about on March 30, 2013

Jon, gilp-- The BMG 105 has fixed shoulder straps. Torso adjustment (i.e. moving shoulder straps up/down) is a great feature but it does add weight and increases possible failure points.

There are Mountain Hardwear packs with this feature - see Shaka/Lani series. However, the BMG (Big Mountain Guide) was purpose built for professional guides and opts for the lighter and longer term durability construction and multiple sizes still allow for a great fit.

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