Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur

Fairbanks, Alaska

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Aaron's Passions

Camping
Backpacking
Snowboarding
Hiking
Paddling

Aaron's Bio

My winter is devoted to finding sweet lines on my board, ripping on some skis, and snowshoeing into the backcountry to get it fresh. In the summer, i canoe and bike as much as possible, shunning the indoors.

Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur wrote an answer about on April 23, 2010

Regular. Their recommendation for a regular torso length might seem a bit short, but it is most likely spot on. If you want to get a real accurate fit, have a friend measure from your c7 vertebrae (the lowest prominent bump in your neck) to the small of your back, and use that number to choose the size. While it might be tempting to get a large for the increased volume, the looser fit won't be worth it. Also, the torso length isn't the only thing they stretch for a larger pack, the waistbelt is also longer, and having that misfit could be detrimental

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Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur wrote an answer about on January 22, 2010

The Ahwahnee would definitely be suitable, but only if you got a vestibule. The tent is 7.5' long and 4.4' wide. That seems roomy, but mark it out on your floor and play camp, get a feel for how much room that actually is. The vestibule adds 13 square feet, and you can get two of them if you feel inclined.
If you are worried about the wind, the ahwahnee can take it. However, due to it's steeper walls, it can get shaky in there. I would recommend looking at the Fitzroy as well, as it is unaffected by the wind. Seriously, it doesn't move.
Lastly, get an attic. They are cheap, light, and add a lot of livability to the tent.

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Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur wrote an answer about on January 22, 2010

Oh, this can take whatever nature throws at it. EPIC fabric is deemed "highly water resistant" because water *can* get through the fabric when it is subject to extreme pressures. What this means to you is that a windblown downpour won't even phase the fabric, but a high-pressure fire hose has a slim chance of forcing some water through.

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Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur wrote an answer about on October 1, 2009

While the hubba hubba does do decently in the wind, the skyledge 2.1 is by far the sturdiest tent out of your selection. The cross poles at the top are joined by a power clip, something that makes the tent significantly sturdier than others. Notice on how the hubba hubba and the copper spur that there is only one pole in the middle that supports it from the ground. this leads to a softer tent top, which can be a concern in the wind. The marmot tent has steeper walls than the skyledge, which catch more wind. Also, the skyledge is pretty darn roomy, it's not called a 2.1 for nothing.

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Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur wrote a review of on October 1, 2009

5 5

Yep, i feel like a total fatass wearing this pack. That's because i don't feel any weight hanging off my shoulders or pulling me back at all. It feels like i just got 50 lbs heavier when I put the pack on.
Sure, its a little heavy. But what's a few pounds when you are cruising in complete harmony across variable terrain? This pack was designed to carry a heavy load for its size and it does it stupendously well. The description sums it up pretty well, but it left out a few features.
Feature #1: Fanny Pack
The lid for the pack clips off and doubles as a fanny pack, with a waist strap stowed in the inside of the lid. I've successfully used it as a summit pack, stuffing it to the brim with the necessities. Since it was so stuffed, it wasn't comfortable and it swung around, but that isn't an issue when it isn't crammed full. Most importantly, the buckle stayed clipped.
Feature #2: Reinforcecd bottom
The bottom of this pack is double walled, making it even stronger and more water resistant on perhaps the most overlooked part of the pack. Its what always hits the ground first, hits the hardest, and stays there the longest, and shields the sleeping bag. Keeping the bottom dry is a crucial aspect that they didn't overlook.
Feature #3: Water Bottle pockets
Out of sight and out of mind, these stowable pockets stash away nicely. When they are pulled out, they are long enough to hold my 1.5 L nalgene well. They also have small velcro tabs that lock down the pockets. You can barely see the ring that the velcro attaches to in the picture.
Feature #4: Gear Loops
Easily visible in the picture, the black gear loops are sturdy velcro and are removable. Also, the bottom gear loop is adjustable, making it easy to get that big ice axe in there.

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0 Comments

Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur wrote an answer about on September 30, 2009

The key here is whichever pack fits you better. In my experience, arc'teryx packs are the best fit, IF they fit. They tend to only fit a small range of people, but the people they fit love them. Gregorys are a little more flexible, fitting a wider range of people.
One feature that really sets this pack apart from the Baltoro is the aluminum stays in the backpanel. These stays increase comfortable load capacity by transferring more weight to the hip belt. Also, by bending the stays to fit the profile of your back you can get an even more comfortable fit. Also, the durability of the Bora is legendary.
Some features that the Baltoro boasts that the Bora lacks are the Response suspension system and better organization. The response system is basically a suspension that moves with you. the hip belt is attached to the pack with a rotating disc that increases mobility, which is nice when you are navigating tricky terrain. The organization is more of a personal choice.

Overall, I think the Bora is a better choice, but you need to go into a gear shop and get them fit to you. Just because you are a small person doesn't mean you need a small pack.

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Aaron Wilbur

Aaron Wilbur wrote an answer about on March 12, 2009

The Supermodel X is your ticket to greatness. It has a tapered profile-wider nose than tail-so you will get great flotation in the powder, and make landings in the pow much easier. Also, this board is equipped with a deeper side cut than the custom, making gnarly turns on groomers a piece of cake. Go to burton's website and compare board specs if you want more details.

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