ALM

ALM

West Kootenays, British Columbia, Canada

ALM's Passions

Hiking & Camping
Biking
Snowshoeing
Skiing
Climbing

ALM's Bio

I live in the mountains. I play in the mountains. I travel to different mountains to play some more. Weekends, evenings, vacation...OUTSIDE!

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

ALM

ALM wrote a review of on April 13, 2010

4 5

I like these bars. The fruit and seeds are a nice change from granola bars which are candy disguised as healthy food, and the burst of energy from these is pretty good. They're squish-resistant in my pack, and deal well with winter. They are really really sweet though, and the date flavour is definitely noticeable.

Full review here: http://www.backpackgeartest.org/reviews/Food/Energy%20Bars%20and%20Drinks/Probar%20%20Fruition%20bars/Test%20Report%20by%20Andrea%20Murland/

(1)

 

0 Comments

ALM

ALM wrote a review of on March 18, 2010

5 5

I love this carabiner. It's my belay/rapell carabiner, and big enough to handle anything I throw in it. It's smooth to run rope through. The screw-gate is easy to operate - it doesn't stick closed, no matter how tightly I crank it shut. I also like the red line to warn when it's unscrewed - one more tool to make it easier to check safety before my climber gets off the ground. I have had this carabiner flip sideways on me once at the top of a rappel as I was figuring out the fall-line - I did a last glance at my set-up before I let the rope run and noticed it crossloading. No fault of the biner (it's certainly big enough to flip around though), but a good reminder to myself to triple-check everything.

(0)

 

0 Comments

ALM

ALM wrote a review of on March 18, 2010

4 5

I bought this belay device as a beginner, and it hasn't failed me yet. I've never had trouble catching a fall, holding a resting climber, lowering someone, or rapelling. Yes, I occasionally have to do a bit of rope-feeding to lower a light climber on a thick and fuzzy rope, but I much prefer that situation to not being able to control the descent of a heavier climber. Same thing with rapelling - I'm not that heavy and sometimes the rap is slow if I've got the brake on pretty hard, but a little less friction on the device and it's not a problem - I'd rather go a bit slow than too fast.

I have found this belay device to be durable, despite being hauled around the world, sat on while I've got my harness on, scraped against rocks, and well-used. It's got some scratches, but that's all.

(0)

 

0 Comments

ALM

ALM wrote a review of on February 18, 2010

4 5

I purchased these gloves in early 2010, and so far I've been using them for a lot more than I thought I would. The temperatures have mostly been hovering a few degrees below freezing, and I've been wearing the gloves for cross-country skiing, ski touring, and general around town use.

While skate skiing, I find that my fingertips are consistently chilly at the beginning, and my hands are bordering on too hot at the end, but to me that's perfect. Anything that's warm enough at the beginning has me sweating part way through my ski, so this glove strikes a pretty good balance. I have enough dexterity to fiddle with bindings, poles, zippers, or waterbottles, and the leather palm lets me carry my gear without it sliding all over the place.

When ski touring, I've been wearing these gloves while skinning up. Same temperature regulation as when cross-country skiing. I can fiddle with my gear with the gloves on, which is awesome. I can also put my skins on and take them off without getting stuck in the glue. I put a shell mitt overtop for the ski down, so snow entry isn't an issue. I have found that the gloves get wet if you put your hands in the snow too often, though! Of course, the gloves aren't waterproof, so that's hardly a surprise.

So far, I'm really, really liking them. =) I haven't had them long enough to assess durability or warmth over time, though.

(0)

 

0 Comments

ALM

ALM wrote a review of on February 5, 2010

5 5

I purchased this harness in 2007, when I was just getting into climbing, and it seemed then like it would be adequate for what I needed then and in the next few years. A lot of other people I saw climbing had the same harness (or the men's equivalent), and it didn't cost an arm and a leg, so it seemed like a good choice. I was right.

The Primrose is comfortable to hang in. It's adjustable, which is pretty important to me, because as much as I'd like to think my weight is stable, it's not. The doubled-back buckles aren't fancy, but they're safe and they work. The gear loops are adequate. Quite frankly, it's perfect for a weekend warrior/evening climber.

I do find that the little strap below the belay loop slips, even when doubled back, and I have to tighten it every so often. The butt straps also slip.

After 3 years of use indoors and outdoors, and a year of rope rescue training, this harness is still in great shape. Other than the odd surface scuff and dirty mark, it practically looks brand new.

A great big thumbs up from me!

(3)

 

0 Comments

ALM

ALM wrote a review of on January 18, 2010

4 5

Ok, first off I'll say that I haven't actually used these pants yet for anything. Actually, I haven't decided if I'm going to keep them. This is not a technical review - purely to try and clear up what I can about the rather confusing set of reviews, pictures, and tech specs about this product.

I wanted a pant with a full side zip, waterproof, preferably with a gaiter, primarily for ski touring. These pants were on sale in the Ebony colour, and they looked perfect.

I read the reviews, I examined the pictures in detail, I looked at the tech specs, I looked at the Norrona website, and I couldn't figure out what features these pants had. The pictures seemed to depend on colour, the tech specs didn't match the reviews, and the Norrona website wasn't very helpful. I chatted to a gear guru who assured me that the pants definitely had side zips, since that was the main thing I couldn't tell from the pictures of the Ebony colour. I ordered the pants.

Fast-forward a week. The pants I received look exactly like the picture of the pants in Ebony. They're grey, with pink zippers. They have 1 pocket in the back, 1 thigh slash pocket, and 1 front hip pocket. They have inseam vents with mesh backing. They have gaiters. They have some kind of tough cut-guard on the inside of the pant at the bottom (not visible from the outside, but I can feel it). They have a side zip, the zipper pull for which you can see at the bottom of the pant in the pictures. But the zipper only goes up to just above the ankle. No full side zip.

So those are the features that the Ebony colour has. I can't speak for Caviar/Blue or Biking Red.

As for sizing, I am 5'2", ~30" waist, ~39-40" hips, and I usually go for a 28" inseam. According to the size chart, I need an XS for length and a M for everything else. I got a small. They're about an inch too long, roomy but not too baggy in the legs and butt, and kind of big in the waist, but I can cinch them down and tuck in layers and make them work.

Without having used them yet, these pants look great. Material is nice, contrasting zippers are nice, they appear to be very well put together and great quality, sizing is close enough...but they don't have one of the main things I was looking for in a touring pant.

(1)

 

0 Answers

0 Comments

0 Comments

0 Comments

ALM

ALM wrote a review of on October 2, 2009

4 5

I cooked on this stove for 2 months straight last summer, and use it for backpacking and camping trips now. It boils water fast, can be turned down to approximate a simmer, and folds up to practically nothing. In its case, it usually gets packed into my pot with no problems at all. Less efficient in the wind 'cause the flame blows sideways, but still useable. Pots are always stable on the stove, but on uneven ground the canister can tip, especially if using a tall canister. No big problem, it just means that I have to hold onto the handle of the pot as I stir or while my dinner cooks. For the price, this stove is reliable, pretty versatile, and super light & tiny. I love it.

(1)

 

0 Comments