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  • #9588of 20025

andrew's Passions

Camping
Sport Climbing

andrew's Bio

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A C wrote a review of on March 5, 2012

5 5

Great super durable pant. I wear a 31"/30" pant and the small fits perfectly.

The orange color, at least on my pair, is very salmon or peach colored though. Slightly more pastel than I'd prefer but at least its not black.

One small design complaint is the piss zipper could be longer. Its kind of hard to dig through my under layers through the short zipper.

I'd also consider making the front bib material a more breathable material like the back. That area can get a little sweaty once you cover it up with a jacket.

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A C wrote an answer about on April 13, 2011

Depends on where you are climbing, the types of routes/difficulty, personal preference and skill.
The larger sizes are certainly useful.
You may find that a whole rack of these is useful and then double up on the sizes that are used the most in your climbing. And leave behind sizes that never get used.

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A C wrote an answer about on September 15, 2010

Those boots aren't going to be be great for crampon use. They are very flexable and will not be very secure gonig up anything even a little steep.
Also they won't be the best on softer snow slopes that you might want to kick steps in.
But for basic walking around on a low angle glacier or frozen snow field, these will be perfect.
Just make sure and get the "strap" version which will work with just about any footwear from sneakers to double plastic boots.

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A C wrote a review of on July 7, 2010

5 5

Has plenty of friction for doing free-hanging rappels on skinny 8mm half ropes but still feeds great on my 10.2 single rope.

Definitely has more friction compared to an ATC-XP on the ropes I rapped.

Doesn't hang up on any rope when belaying except of course for the ubiquitous fuzzy gym rope.

For me this replaces a Trango Jaws which would hang up more belaying and wasn't as smooth to rap.

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A C wrote an answer about on January 25, 2010

They would work fine for both, but be super careful about using these on regular hiking boots with soft soles.
Its very easy to get yourself over your head going up something that you won't have the performance of stiff boots to safely get down.
The strap binding isn't really that much more difficult to put on but its harder to be certain that you have a good connection whereas the newmatic feels a little more secure and is easier to verify.
Of course if you plan on using these with hiking boots occasionally you can only get the new classic (strap version).

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A C wrote an answer about on January 22, 2010

sometimes you buy something, barely use it over a couple years and then it fails
luckily if you bought them here you can send them back anytime for a full refund. either log on to your account or click on "chat now" at the top right corner.
if you didn't buy it here you need to contact columbia and they may or may not fix or replace it

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A C wrote an answer about on January 22, 2010

Colorado is generally a lot "drier" of snow than other places. Generally you need to manage your internal moisture more there than exterior moisture. Don't go to bed with too much clothing or you'll just sweat and wake up hours later moist and freezing. And if you don't need to don't curl up in your bag totally zipped up with the hood cinched tight.
Did you build your snowcave correctly? It shouldn't be that cold inside, the sleeping area should be a bit above the entrance to get the full protection of one.

If you are hiking a bit to camp I'd get a down bag. If you are camping by the road or in your backyard go with a cheaper and bulkier synthetic.

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A C wrote an answer about on January 14, 2010

Its impossible to know whether an 8 or a 7.5 will fit you just from "I wear a 7 1/2"
Find some merrells locally even if they aren't this exact shoe to see how they fit on your foot.
You can use these for snowshoeing. But if you plan a doing a lot I'd recommend a boot without the mesh sides. Even though they have the gore-tex, they will eventually break down a bit and water/wet snow, will get though.
Also, if you are going anywhere chilly it would be better to have a boot with some insulation as the only warmth from these boots will be your socks.

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A C wrote an answer about on December 23, 2009

Make sure you are looking at fuel "bottles" not canisters. The 20oz size is pretty useful if only bigger than I need for most trips.

This stove really only runs on white gas, of which coleman fuel is.

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A C wrote an answer about on December 22, 2009

If you already have a jacket that has an appropriate amount of warmth why not just throw on a rain jacket on top when the weather turns sour? You just need to size a jacket to be large enough to fit over your down jacket. It doesn't have to be anything fancy, a Marmot precip jacket would do the trick.

On whether this would be warm enough, I don't know how your down jacket compares. The 700-fill doesn't indicate how much down it has, just the quality of the filling. But being that this is a 3 lb jacket with synthetic fill it should be warm for most days in the city that its warm enough to rain.

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