Hurry & Get It Before Labor Day Weekend—Order With Free 2-Day* by 5PM MT on 8/27
A-Bomb

A-Bomb

    New Feature

    Browse Your Followers or See Who You're Following

  • #1620of 20088

Andrew's Passions

Backpacking
Camping
Trail Running
Sport Climbing

Andrew's Bio

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote a review of on June 2, 2014

4 5

Familiarity: I've used it several times
Fit: Runs small

I love how light these feel on my feet and how the seem to conform to my feet and the terrain. My only minor coimplaint is that due to their minimal sole, you will definitely feel rocks (sometimes painfully) on rockier trails. Not sure if there could be a better balance between shoe weight and rock protection, but they're close. On trails with less debris/rocks, they're flat out awesome.

Like all La Sportiva, they run small.

(1)

 

0 Comments

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote a review of on June 2, 2014

2 5

Familiarity: I returned this product before using it
Fit: Runs large

I have a pair of MH Canyon shorts that are over 10 years old that I love, but these just don't compare. I went through the hassle of ordering the 32x7 and 30x7 because I normally wear a 31 or 32 in blue jeans or slacks. Both were way too large in the waist, and since I do a lot of backpacking and don't trust the belt to do it's job with a hip belt pulling down on them I sent them back for the 28x7. The problem with the 28x7 is that while the waist size was perfect, they're way too tight in the thighs to hike in without significant binding and chafing. Since I bought these for being active in they simply weren't going to cut it. They're not as functional as my old Canyon shorts (also with 7" inseam), which flare at the bottom and allow for much freer movement.

Maybe the 9" inseam shorts are different, but I like my hiking shorts short.

I should probably add that I'm a slim guy at 5'-8" and 140 lbs so I'm not packing huge thighs...

(0)

 

0 Comments

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote an answer about on February 14, 2013

When in June? June's kinda early for Rainier. I wore a pair of these in early June on a guided climb. I ended up regretting it because my feet were cold, and I bailed on the summit atttempt! It didn't help that my boots were a little too small. The guides who even owned these boots said they don't use the Nepal Evo's till July. If you have the correct fit, it might work, but if I had to do it again I would definitely go with double boots. I've generally found that these boot are more well suited to single day trips than multiday where your boots could get freezing cold as night. My buddy had single leather mountaineering boots (different brand) on the same trip and while he did make the summit he still felt in hindsight that double boots would have been much better for our early June trip.

(0)

 

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote an answer about on February 23, 2012

Depends on which version of the pack you get. My understanding is that the older versions the strap only went over the side pockets while in newer versions there is a slit that allows you to put the strap either over or under the side pockets. This can be seen in the photos above. The blue pak doesn't have the slits, but upon close inspection you can see that the orange pack offers the slits in the side pockets to make the change.

(0)

 

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote a review of on February 21, 2012

5 5

This softshell is thinner than I expected, but it's a great layering piece. It breathes extremely well, in contrast to my experience with other soft shells, and it sheds light to moderate wind very well. Unless the weather gets really heinous I don't need my hardshell and can rely on this jacket to provide weather protection. OR makes some great products! I keep being impressed with the OR items I buy, especially for their price. This is actually the second Ferrosi jacket I own. The first one was the non-hooded version and I loved it so much I had to get the hoody.

(0)

 

0 Comments

0 Comments

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote a review of on February 15, 2012

2 5

I was hoping this pack would be my pack for doing a long thru-hike this summer. Supposedly Osprey revamped this pack from previous years to allow for more weight carrying. Their website indicates max loads from 35 to 45 lbs. Backcountry.com indicates up to 35 lbs. I gave the pack a few trial runs with up to 35 lbs and anticipated going higher.. At first the pack seemed great, but when I went for a 16 miler one day with 35 lbs, the hip belt became unreasonably uncomfortable after about 5 hours. The hip belt design on this pack seems to be a total afterthought in comparison to the rest of the Airspeed suspension design. The hip belt design creates pressure points where the hip belt meets the back of the pack. Otherwise the Airspeed suspension system worked great at minmizing back sweat. The rest of the pack seemed great, but unfortunately for me the pack ended up ebing uncomfortable, maybe because my bodytype is very thin. YMMV

(0)

 

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote a review of on June 15, 2011

4 5

I've owned a pair of 44.5 for about 6 months now. That's a size or two bigger than I would normally wear. I've worn them a few times at 10-12,000 ft in AZ in January and on Mt Rainier in early June. I've warn them with the original footbed and the thin Superfeet footbed. Sometimes I wear the tongue insert to give a snugger fit, but I've also worn them without to give more space, thinking that my feet were cold due to constriction. I've tried various sock combinations, but typically wear a vapor barrier with liner sock and thick wool sock. In AZ I've gotten mildly chilly toes while standing around, but nothing serious. On Rainier, I lost feeling in my toes and had trouble wiggling them due to the cold. I may have expected too much with these boots, but I don't think they're all that warm in the toes. The rest of my foot has always been fine. I personally wouldn't take them out for significant "winter mountaineering" as shown to the right on this page as a "Recommended Use". If you check the insulation in the toes it's very thin. I'll probably try another footbed to see if I can stem heat loss through the sole, but my toes have also felt cold across of the top when it's been an issue. The boot definitely doesn't seem too tight either.

I'll probably keep these for doing 14ers in CO later into spring, but I'll also probably be picking up a pair of Baruntse so I don't have to worry about it anymore on multi-day trips.

All in all, I think the boot is well made, but probably not warm enough for me for some of the things I like to do. I've never considered myself prone to cold feet before, but it is possible that my circulation or other physical issue is causing the problem. I don't think it should be advertised as a "winter mountaineering" boot. It's ok for quicker day trips, but for multi-day trips something warmer might be necessary or recommended IMO. For extended cold weather trips I'll definitely be picking up a pair of double boots.

(1)

 

A-Bomb

A-Bomb wrote a review of on January 19, 2011

2 5

I'd look elsewhere. Tried these out for warmer (Arizona) winter mountaineering. The leather wets out quickly and the gloves are impossible to turn inside out to dry if moisture becomes an issue. The leather has already started to wear in small spots. Can't imagine what would have ahppened on actual rock. Maybe I was just using them wrong, but I definitely wasn't satisfied. Thanks for Backcountry's awesome return policy. I usually love most of Mountain Hardwear's gear...

(0)

 

0 Comments