Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50* Up to 25% Off Marmot – Save on Clothing and Gear


Your gaiters shouldn't fight you.

Outdoor Research designed Endurance Gaiters to move with you so you can conquer the steeps without having to dig rocks, sticks, and scree out of your boots every few feet. The stretchy uppers are made with elastane for a natural-feel that moves with your body without binding or pinching.

  • Nylon and polyester upper leg construction reduces weight while remaining tough and weatherproof
  • Super-tough BioThane instep strap for year-round dependability
  • Breathable fabrics throughout allow water vapor and sweat to escape
  • Movement-mirroring stretch for natural-feeling comfort
  • Abrasion-resistant elements in areas of the highest wear
  • 1.5-inch wide hook-and-loop front closure is tough and allows adjustment

Share your thoughts



No file chosen

Rather attach a photo from another website?

Rather attach a photo from your computer?

    Add a:
  • Share a photo
  • Share a video


Only jpg, jpeg, png, gif or bmp files please.

Now review from the App.Download

Here's what others have to say...


Probably best for larger/stiff footwear

  • Gender:Male
  • Familiarity:I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I picked these up specifically for fast and light alpine climbs where I'd be wearing approach shoes and trail pants without internal gaiters. My intent was to prevent scree and snow from entering my shoes minimizing time required to stop empty/adjust shoes.

I wore these with the La Sportiva Ganda Guide, in hindsight this just isn't the best combination. It may partly be due to the sizing of the combination. I tested with 44.5 shoes and L\XL gaiters. When I test fit the Endurance gaiters I was excited that the instep strap seemed very durable but easy to adjust. Closures also seemed
durable and not overly complex. One issue I did note even while test fitting the Ganda\Endurance combination was the instep buckle sat very close to the ground. Additionally the toe hooks seem to mate to the shoes poorly, possibly due to the asymmetric lacing path of the Ganda that curves toward the big toe of each shoe.

During my first climb using this combination I found the gaiters easy and quick to get in place which is pretty huge since early morning fights with stiff clumsy gaiters just start the day wrong. Pretty quickly I noticed the toe hooks wouldn't seem to stay in place and I ended up adjusting multiple times throughout the day, though the gaiters did largely keep scree from entering my shoes I doubt they'd be successful in snow if I can't find a way to keep the toe hooks down.

Partly I think the issue with the toe hooks is the attachment to the gaiter. Each hook is riveted to what appears to be a firm plastic card allowing the hooks to pivot individually, which should help adjust to optimal angle, however, the card itself seems to only be attached to the leading edge of the gaiter (likely to minimize seams) this allows the card itself to angle away from the body of the gaiter and the hooks may rotate far enough to pop off the laces in my case. It may help keep the hooks engaged if the card were either bonded entirely to the gaiter body or the hooks were in some other way directly attached to the leading edge of the gaiter.

The gaiters have been pretty durable. Even with lots of scrambling on rough talus and grinding on scree there were no rips, tears, or even identifiable wearing. The instep strap buckles did scrape frequently due to the location near the bottom of the shoe's sole but held up without issue. I did notice some cracking in the hook and loop material, this is more of a thin plastic vs. traditional Velcro, but I haven't noticed any affect on function or ability to hold closure tabs in place.

Aside from the toe hooks not working well with the Ganda Guide my only other real complaint with the Endurance gaiters is also probably more of an issue with the Ganda Guide shoes. Where the instep strap attaches to the gaiter upper and contacts the shoe upper I ended up with tears on both shoes. This again is more of an issue of the material used for the uppers of the Ganda Guide in that location which pretty unacceptable for a shoe touting durability and use for climbing. Though with new footwear pushing the bounds of materials used for footwear it seems gaiters that might be targeting use with lighter footwear should be careful of potential wearing on contact points.

Overall I'll hold on to the L\XL pair for use with my summer boots and might test fit a S/M pair approach shoes, to see if they mate better, as I ultimately like the design and durability just not the combination with the Sportiva Ganda Guide shoes so far.

Probably best for larger/stiff footwear

Nicely made BUT...

  • Familiarity:I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

OR makes some great stuff and in terms of materials and workmanship these are typically OR, very well done. However, they are poorly sized/proportioned, for me at least. The top of this gaiter may fit around my wrist but never ever ever will it fit my lower calf. I'm not a small guy, granted, but it would appear these were sized for someone with sticks for legs. Think starving meth addict dimensions, if you have calves like matchsticks, these may fit you well. Additionally, I found the closure to be rather awkward. I will grant that this may just be me, but I found that having to manipulate the zipper in not one but two dimensions to close these caused the whole thing to shift out of position. Had I been able to actually zip them closed around my apparently unnaturally massive, gargantuan calves, I would have then had to wrestle the confounded things back into place. I like my feet and I'm willing to put up with a little hastle to keep them happy but there are limits.