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  • MSR - Whisperlite Universal Stove - One Color

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  • MSR - Whisperlite Universal Stove - One Color

MSR Whisperlite Universal Stove

$139.95

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    • One Color, One Size
      $139.95
    4.5521

    21 Reviews

    Details

    Quiet, versatile, and ready to go anywhere.

    As MSR's best-selling hybrid-fuel stove, the Whisperlite Universal allows you to use either liquid fuel or canister fuel so you can burn just about anything, anywhere. Lightweight aluminum and carefully engineered stainless steel maximize trail-friendly durability without adding unnecessary weight. Fold this stove down to its most compact configuration, slide it in your bag, hop a plane, and, when you arrive, fire up a meal with anything from white gas to unleaded gasoline.
    • Burns a variety of fuels using fuel-specific jets and fuel-source couplers unique to either canister or liquid sources
    • Canister liquid feed includes a basic stand for inverting canister for better cold-weather performance and more consistent output
    • Swap between one of three self-cleaning Shaker Jets and one of two source couplers to match your fuel of choice
    • Shaker Jets clear the fuel-providing mechanism with a simple shake of the hand, eliminating messy maintenance
    • Wide stainless pot stands hold pots large or small so you can cook up a meal or easily melt heavy scoops of snow
    • Item #CAS0742

    Tech Specs

    Fuel Type
    white gas, kerosene, unleaded gasoline, MSR IsoPro
    Boil Time
    (white gas) 3.5 min/L, (kerosene) 4.4 min/L, (MSR IsoPro) 3.75 min/L
    Burn Time
    (white gas) 110 min, (kerosene) 155 min, (MSR IsoPro) 75 min
    Piezo Ignition
    no
    Simmer
    yes
    Claimed Weight
    13.7 oz
    Recommended Use
    backpacking
    Manufacturer Warranty
    lifetime

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    THE Stove

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    For many, this stove has been a staple for the most extreme backcountry expeditions. A classic that has been reinvented with the Universal edition, now you will always be sure that you can get a hot cup of joe in the morning and a full feed at night.



    We took this stove around the island of Crete, Greece by Kayak for 30 days straight, cooking morning and night in the sand, grit, and saltwater. The entirety of the trip, we only needed to keep the pump clean and the stove did the rest. I've used the original whisperlite in the mountains and never had a problem with cold or elevation. It just works.

    THE Stove

    The quiver-killer of camp stoves

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer



    It beats any canister stove at altitude, packs up small, and won't blink when you load it up with heavy cast iron pans while car camping.



    The whisperlite has always been my go-to camping stove, and while the learning curve can be steep for some folks, once you learn the whisperlite, you'll never switch stoves again.



    Should you need to, taking it fully disassembling it is a breeze and swapping jets when you change fuels is simple.



    I have used this stove for hundreds of meals from the North Pole to the tropics and would recommend it to anyone looking for a reliable, burn anything, camp stove.

    The quiver-killer of camp stoves

    Exceptional Performance

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    I have now used my WhisperLite Universal now over a few short car-camping trips and am proud to say that I am very pleased with it.
    The setup is easy and I like how the pot stands stands stay in the correct position when they are open. with The original WhisperLite, in my experience, was a little more finicky.
    If I were to criticize anything it is turning off the gas canister. I have turned the valve all of the way off but the flame continues to burn for minutes after, wasting fuel. I will start blowing out the flame and unscrewing the canister to release pressure in hopes this will solve itself.
    Otherwise a great product!

    Small, Versatile

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    It's nice to have the fuel flexibility you get with this whisperlite stove. The stove holds good sized pans, so you can boil up some water or fry up some eggs. This is a great for car camping as well as backpacking. I find I need a solid surface to balance it, but it's not huge issue while backpacking.

    If you are traveling outside the US, the MSR XGK EX Multi-fuel stove will give you even more gas burning options. The XGK is also better for more extreme environments. If it's windy, it will do better. And it is more stable, so if a lumpy rock is your typical dinner table, the XGK is for you.

    Small, Versatile

    Great Review!

    • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

    One of my customers shared some great information about this stove. I had to pass it along!
    Regarding you interest:
    Let me know what you think of the Whisperlite Universal, I have been eyeing that one!

    Here are my results:
    - Weight, burn/boil rates are found online in other reviews.
    - Usage: How I use my stoves is because where and when I hike.
    I do most of my hiking in the fall and winter here in New Hampshire in the White Mtns. Depending and temps and wind I do cook inside of my tent.
    - Conditions I will not tolerate in any stove:
    Flair up when lighting
    Not being able to position stove on insulating pad while cooking. (stove becomes too hot or directs heat downward to melt pad.)

    That being said, here are my suggestions for the MSR whisperlite universal: Results based on use of MSR 11oz. fuel bottle.
    Before using the whisperlite for the first time, I took everything apart per instruction manual and and lubed with a synthetic oil. Also put a drop of oil on all threads and fuel probe. Installed white gas nipple and fuel adapter.

    Lighting/priming:
    I use alcohol to prime all my gas/kerosene stoves. I carry a plastic squirt bottle. size and amount depends on duration of outing.
    - No difference in fuel weight since I am saving the stove fuel lost in priming. Plastic bottle weight is minor.

    1) If fuel bottle is not filled, fill to recommended line and reinsert pump.
    2) Pump bottle three times only. Actually two will do once you get use to this method.
    3) Connect fuel bottle to stove.
    4) Place stove over flat round aluminum heat reflector, or you will burn whatever the stove is place on. Use foil wind/reflector and place to block wind if necessary. Use will direct more heat to stove and pan.
    5) Fill priming cup and squirt alcohol around burner head.
    6) Light. Alcohol is almost invisible in anything but dark shade. Watch liquid level in priming cup.
    7) When priming cup is empty turn valve on pump all the way open. Listen for vaporized gas hiss, light with match. NO Flareup, NO soot. stove is now on low, great for anything but boiling.
    8) Pump up as necessary to boil.

    To go from boiling to simmer:
    1) If stove not at high pressure, pump it up.
    2) Make sure valve is open all the way.
    3) Flip fuel bottle over, extend valve handle to act as a support.
    4) Stove will flame out shortly. It will take longer and sometimes not work at all if pressure was too low before flipping.
    5) Listen or count to 5.
    6) Flip fuel bottle and pump back to run position and relight stove. You may need to pump it once or twice. You are now at low simmer. Using valve, adjust flame as low as possible before it turns to yellow flame.

    To extinguish:
    1) Pump up stove to high.
    2) Valve all the way open.
    3) Flip fuel bottle over using valve handle as support leg.
    4) Stove will flare out shortly.
    5) Close valve with fuel bottle still flipped over.
    6) Detach stove from fuel bottle with no fuel drippings.

    Overall Impressions:

    The MSR Whisperlite Universal stove works great on canister fuel. One of the best simmers I have experienced, (oil screw threads before attaching first canister on new stove). Getting it to run well on white gas/Coleman fuel for my demands took a little experimentation, kerosene is another matter which I haven't pursued and probably won't, unless I can't get white gas/Coleman fuel.

    Conclusions:
    The MSR Whisperlite Universal stove does fit my requirements for an all around stove. I'm not comparing the MSR to other stoves, I am only seeing if it will fit my personal requirements for an outback stove.

    Love this stove!

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times

    After having a couple of JetBoils that also work great, I decided to try something new. I had been reading alot on winter camping and that canister fuels weren't the best in winter conditions so I wanted to get something that could burn both liquid and the canisters. I also wanted something that didn't concentrate the heat in one spot so much. I wanted something more like your regular gas range at home with a wider flame bed and more control. Enter the WhisperLite Universal! This stove is without a doubt my goto stove. I used this thing with a 230g canister this winter down to -20f and it performed great! I tried to keep the canister in my bag at night but at -20f, once you expose that canister it only takes a minute and it is pretty well cold. I boiled 12L of water and was able to cook desert(10 min. simmer time) on one canister of fuel. Even at these temps i was able to control the flame very well using the canister fuel until the can started getting low then it was just more of a constant high simmer. Still was able to use pretty much all of the fuel in the can very effectively though. Thus, completely putting my winter canister worries to rest. Have used it with white gas as well but in my opinion canisters are the way to go. Don't get me wrong, the liquid does have its advantages in certain situations/applications but for what I do I prefer canister. Which is why this stove is so awesome. It converts easily between the two in about a minute or two.

    It may be a little heavier and bulkier than some of the minimalist stoves the thru hikers use but for backcountry camping it's one tough and dependable stove!

    Nice stove if you get a good one

      The first one I received the legs were too tight on the cup they would just grind. The second one I received there was no way possible to unscrew the jet, all the wrench would do was strip it. The third one I received the line was bent on a wrong angle so when I did remove the jet it wouldn't line up to go back in . After Backcountry made it right with 3 stoves I figured i'd call MSR instead of backcountry & they sent me out a new line that works as it should.



      Aside from the headache getting a properly working stove I do really like it. Haven't had a chance to use it on the trail yet but I don't anticipate any issues. Not sure if it's just mine but there always seems to be some fuel left in the line when you turn it off so be aware when you disconnect it.

      Mind the threads

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      Between the 4 of us this piece of gear prolly took the most punishment. We used it with isobutane fuel canisters exclusively. It lasted a good 168 miles of Appalachian Trail abuse before the threads stripped out. The threads on the throttle where the fuel canister connects are/were aluminum, the threads of canisters are steel...here we have a slight problem. Granted, Shortbus was always screwing off my can of fuel, and screwing his on to burn weight, so the the poor threads were at the mercy of an idiot. No biggie, just needed to return to civilization to swap out the stripped seal. After that we babied her and the seal lasted another 700 miles before failing again from accumulated frantic canister screwing. I consider this a fair amount of use before wearing out, I mean on and off on and off, four or five times a day is a lot of abuse...but brass threads would last MUCH longer than aluminum. At the end of the day I know a guy at MSR who I haggled with and he sent me two spare throttles...once I was 700 miles in, he knew I meant business. Pretty sure a design change is in the mix. After the second throttle piece, she carried us home with flawless operation...Despite being thrown around and being just so mistreated in the most stupid ways imaginable. Is there any other stove that can handle the amount of business a Whisperlite can? No.

      She simmers, she roars, she bakes, she fries...its like having 1/4 of Ma's range in the woods.

      Mixed emotions

        I recently purchased the MSR Whisper Lite universal, and I have to say I am torn about it. First off it works great... easy to assemble light weight and versatile.... everything I want in a multi fuel stove. That being said, I am however disappointed in how difficult it is to change from gas to liquid fuel. I own an old Brunton MF stove that with a twist of the cup switches from gas to liquid. With the MSR Whisperlite Universal you have to change out the jets and it is a little bit of a bother when I was used to just a simple switch. But other than that I like it and look forward to cooking meal after meal with it in my travels

        Sweet stove

        • Familiarity: I've used it several times

        The stove is really easy to use and packs down really small. The included windscreen really helps when trying to cook in a big storm or on a windy point. Being able to use pretty much any fuel is nice too, and the nozzle is easily changed...AND INCLUDED.

        Switching the jets is difficult

        • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

        In order to ensure that the different jets don't leak fuel, you have to torque them down pretty tight. Once you've done this, it's hard to get them off again to switch fuel types without bending the generator tube.

        Very Versatile

        • Familiarity: I've used it several times

        To be quite honest I probably could have just gone with a Pocket Rocket, saved some money and space in my pack, and been fine. BUT, I do like that the fuel canister is set away from the burners, and that it has its own wide stand. Something about boiling water sitting on top of an unstable canister base makes me feel a little uneasy. There is also the fuel versatility; I'll probably use canister fuel 99% of the time, but who knows... I just like having that option.



        This thing boils water fast! I thought I was just getting great results the first time I was using it because we were at ~sea level. Just used it again at 9K feet, and it was bringing 2 cups to a boil before I even thought to check. I would probably give this 5 starts if it packed down a LITTLE bit smaller

        Very Versatile

        Just brought an MSR Universal but wasn't...

        Just brought an MSR Universal but wasn't able to purchase the fuel tank, so I will be using the canister. My question is, if the fuel in the ISOPRO canister hasn't been used up, is it okay to just put the cap back on and put it in my pack for future use, or do I have to consume the whole thing once used? I'm afraid the isopropane contents might leak in my pack.



        One more thing, what is the best and safest way to store this in my pack?

        Best Answer

        Because its a sealed canister the IsoPro will last until it is consumed. You do not need to use it in one sitting or even put the little cap back on. White Gas and some other liquid fuel has a shelf life, the canisters do not. I usually try to store my gas below my food so if it were to leak it would not contaminate, if possible store in a separate bag all together. It will not leak unless punctured so keep away from tent poles, knives, and other things that may puncture that canister. When it is completely gone THEN puncture the canister so you can recycle it properly.

        Is pump included?

        Is pump included?

        In IsoPro canister mode, does it simmer?...

        In IsoPro canister mode, does it simmer? It appears to me that in canister mode, you've basically got a WindProII?

        Best Answer

        Hey,

        With the IsoPro canister this stove is essentially the same as the wind pro ll. MSR claims that both of them can simmer with the canister in the upright position. An inverted canister will have more pressure built up and will be more applicable during colder temps, higher elevation and low fuel in the canister.

        Can I use a Primus ETA pot with the built-in...

        Can I use a Primus ETA pot with the built-in heat exchanger on the MSR WisperLIte Universal?

        Can I use Diesel fuel in this gear?

        Can I use Diesel fuel in this gear?

        Hi Jan,



        You want to consider several stoves from Primus for burning diesel. Those would be the OmniFuel, MultiFuel EX, and the OmniLite TI.



        If you need to burn it, you need to burn it, but diesel is undoubtedly the most disgusting and filthy fuel you can use. Not only that, it's brutally hard on any stove. If it's going to be a regular thing for you, get a maintenance kit at the same time you buy the stove, and keep it away from your other gear or you'll end up with greasy soot all over everything.

        Do I need to buy additionally the 'cork'...

        Do I need to buy additionally the 'cork' or just the fuel bottle, such as this: http://www.backcountry.com/msr-fuel-bottles?

        Does anyone knows if I can use this Stove...

        Does anyone knows if I can use this Stove with PRIMUS Power Gas cartridge?

        Does this stove include the pump? Or do I...

        Does this stove include the pump? Or do I need to order that along with the fuel canister?