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Description

An integrated cooking system for solo backpackers.

Make the most of every ounce of fuel you carry when you cook with the MSR Reactor 1.0L Stove System. MSR's engineers went to great lengths to make this stove efficient with built-in windscreens, a burner that boils water quickly, even in high wind, and a fuel regulator that stretches every canister of fuel just a little further. Ideal for a solo backpacker, this compact system uses a nesting configuration that allows you to slide the fuel canister and burner inside the pot for easy, contained storage.

  • Stainless steel pot is highly durable and includes a collapsible handle that flips over the see-through lid to keep everything when the system is packed up
  • Radiant burner is enclosed by a heat exchanger that maximizes heat transfer from the burner to the pot so you boil water fast, even in high wind
  • To create a secure, integrated fuel system, the burner locks into the base of the pot, and the fuel canister screws into the base of the burner
  • Burner control twists to open or close the fuel regulator and control heat
  • Internal regulator feeds fuel at a consistent rate for a reliable flame throughout the life of the canister
  • Burner and fuel canister nest inside the one-liter pot to make this stove compact and easy to pack
  • Package includes: Reactor stove, 1L hard anodized aluminum pot, handle, and BPA-free lid
  • Note: fuel canister sold separately

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

MSR Reactor Nukes The Competition

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

While living in Seattle I had the opportunity to pick up the first MSR Reactor with 1.7 L setup and put it to use on many glacier adventures. While on the summit of Rainier we put it head to head with the Jetboil and boiling time was nearly a third less. It works great in wind, you can regulate the flame and it's lightweight.

I've noticed since MSR has since changed to the 1.0 pot that many are having difficulties with packing it. Having a couple of friends at MSR I sent off a message to find out if they're improving it or a recommended method to packing it and awaiting an answer. I'll post it when received.

5 5

amazing

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I used this stove while backpacking in the Uinta's. Not only is this thing super light and easy to pack, it cooks super fast.

5 5

Best stove ever for melting snow

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

The worst chore I have when alpine climbing is getting drinking water from the snow. The Reactor cuts that time in half. This sucker melts it so fast it makes others jealous. Buy it, you'll like it.

3 5

Packing the 1.0L it is chore

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Most uses between 7000 and 12000 feet elevation in the Northern Sierras. For a canister stove, the Reactor performs well in the snowy, windy, and colder temperatures. With that said, I have been ready to throw the stove down the mountain on several occasions as a result of fighting it to go together.

I must physically wedge the stove in the pot with the infamous "valve in the pour spout" technique. Then the lid still doesn't fit flat because the high point of the stove (inverted) hits directly with the low point of the lid in the center. Causing the lid to fit almost twisted.

The design for packing the 1.0L is a poor one. I fear each time I pack the stove I will either break the stove valve and/or break the lid. Not to mention when I do get all the stars aligned and the lid snaps shut under load, I then have to fight to get the stove out as it has been wedged in so hard.

I first thought that I may have received a defective pot that was slightly off in diameter or a stove valve with an unusually long stem. Then for a split second I though maybe I was on one of those hidden camera TV shows to capture my frustration and choice words when the two parts would not come together.....

Lastly on the point of furl. My local retailer has the 4oz canister for 4.99 and the 8oz canister for only 5.99. The 1.0L reactor will only pack the "new" 4oz fuel. I find it difficult to purchase the 4oz when I would get double the fuel for only a dollar more.

Bottom line: I have packed and attempted to pack/unpacked the stove on more that a dozen occasions. Packing the stove & canister in the 1.0L pot is at best very aggravating and at worst an invitation to damage the stove and/or pot. I have chosen since to pack the stove and 8oz fuel canister outside the pot and fill the pot with other items.

Bryan, CA

Responded on

I feel your pain! There is a way to get it in the pot without all the frustration you've expressed. The best way to pack this stove is first place the towel in the bottom of the pot, then turn the 4 oz canister upside down. Finally turn the stove upside down, fold in the valve so it is positioned down, angle the stove with the valve end slightly up and place it in the pot with the valve positioned in the pour spout. The stove is a tight fit no doubt, but if you're trying to put the stove in directly without angling it, you will not be very successful. In fact you will experience exactly what you described. The lid won't fit on properly and it will fill like you are crushing the stove.

To get it back out, I simply shake the pot a few times and it should slip right out. After figuring out the stove needs to be angled to get it in, I have never been frustrated with packing it. I will try to post a video of me doing this at a later date.

Just so you know, this stove was designed first for the 1.7L pot and then later MSR realized that their was a demand for a 1.0L pot. The fact that it doesn't slip in perfectly does not effect the ultimate performance of this amazing stove, and the size and weight is now comparable to many of our competitors out there. Simply put, if you want the best performing, most efficient stove out there (in the real world where there is actually wind and cold) then the Reactor is the best canister stove available. Now in a convenient 1.0L size!

4 5

Good - but Different

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I own the reactor stove and started with the original 1.6 liter pot. I recently bought the 1.0 liter pot for a little less weight and pack size. While this one boils water just as well as the 1.6 liter version (which is AMAZING), the stove doesn't fit in the pot as well. It does fit, but requires a bit more careful planning to get it to work. The pour spout is very handy, but the burner adjuster is meant to fit right into the spout when the stove is packed into the top of the pot. A bit tricky and can risk scratching the interior of the pot.

Overall - a worthwhile purchase. But, consider getting the 1.6L setup if you don't absolutely need the 1.0 L. Same great water boiling prowess (which really is significant - this thing boils fast, is impervious to wind, etc. etc. - just like others have reported) with easier packing.

5 5

MSR Reactor

I have been using the reactor all around the Coast Mountains and Cascades for some time and am very happy with it. Ridiculously fast. Sometimes a bit tricky to light in the wind but never had to take more than a couple tries. Best use is for melting snow and boiling water to pour into dehydrated meal bags. I try to keep the pot clean but have even successfully simmered noodles and pasta by holding the pot.

MSR Reactor: Competitive Advantage

Randy the MSR Stove Czar demonstrates the advantages of the Reactor stove system. The Reactor is the fastest, most fuel efficient stove system on the planet. It's also the only stove system that offers true performance in real-world conditions like wind, cold and altitude. That's why it's a favorite of alpine climbers, mountaineers and anyone who depends on their stove in the backcountry. Just ask Randy.