Free 2-Day Shipping on Orders Over $50* – Limited Time Only

Detail Images

  • MSR HyperFlow Microfilter One Color

Available colors

  • MSR HyperFlow Microfilter One Color

MSR HyperFlow Microfilter

$99.95

Free 2-Day shipping on orders over $50*

Select a Size:

Select options
  • Select options
    • One Size

    Select a Color:

    Select options
    • One Color
    3.5 5 61

    61 Reviews

    Details

    The Hyperflow skimps on size and weight while maximizing efficiency and convenience.

    Why did MSR's Hyperflow Microfilter win the 08 Backpacker Editor's Choice Award? It's super small (7 x 3.5in), super light (7.4oz), and it pumps three liters per minute. That means you can pack quick-filtering power without sacrificing weight or space on your fast-pace backpacking trips. The Hyperflow Microfilter's float end stays face-down in the lake or stream and won't clog up as you pump, and an included Quick Connect Bottle Adapter connects to MSR, Nalgene, and other bottles with 63mm threaded openings. No tools are needed to disassemble the Hyperflow Microfileter for on-the-go cleaning.
    • Item #CAS0471

    Tech Specs

    Filter Material
    Hollow Fiber
    Output
    3 L / min
    Removes
    protozoa, bacteria, particles
    Field-Cleanable
    yes
    Dimensions
    3.5 in 7 in
    Gravity Flow
    no
    Cartridge Life
    1000 L
    Claimed Weight
    7.8 oz
    Recommended Use
    backpacking, camping

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Compact, light

    • Familiarity:I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

    Good little pump that works well for just one. I haven't experienced the backflow problems that others have listed in their reviews but my use has been limited.

    Great for individuals, not for groups

      I have had this filter for 2 years now and have filtered over a hundred liters. This filter can have a very short life but can also last a along time. The reason for this is how often the unit is cleaned relative to the amount of water pumped. The longer I have waited to clean the filter the greater the frustration cleaning it. I have also found that if you back flush immediately after filtering the best results are found. I think of this as a function of pressure. From what I can tell you cannot create the same amount of pressure with pulling a vacuum as you can with pumping. The harder you pump the hard it is to clean. To combat the lack of pressure from suction I built and adapter for a faucet to back flush at high pressures. In the backcountry I will never filter more than 3 liters without back flushing with half a liter. This is all I have to personally filter at one time. With that being said I really do like this filter in certain situations. This filter is light and compact, which makes it great for personal use but due to that maintenance not good for groups. I use this filter for solo trips and on every day hike because I only need to filter small quantities of water and want to keep my pack light. Back Flushing is slightly time consuming but just takes practice. This filter may pump fast but is not for impatient people due to cleaning.

      Great for an individual, not for groups

        I have had this filter for 2 years now and have filtered over a hundred liters. This filter can have a very short life but can also last a along time. The reason for this is how often the unit is cleaned relative to the amount of water pumped. The longer I have waited to clean the filter the greater the frustration cleaning it. I have also found that if you back flush immediately after filtering the best results are found. I think of this as a function of pressure. From what I can tell you cannot create the same amount of pressure with pulling a vacuum as you can with pumping. The harder you pump the hard it is to clean. To combat the lack of pressure from suction I built and adapter for a faucet to back flush at high pressures. In the backcountry I will never filter more than 3 liters without back flushing with half a liter. This is all I have to personally filter at one time. With that being said I really do like this filter in certain situations. This filter is light and compact, which makes it great for personal use but due to that maintenance not good for groups. I use this filter for solo trips and on every day hike because I only need to filter small quantities of water and want to keep my pack light. Back Flushing is slightly time consuming but just takes practice. This filter may pump fast but is not for impatient people due to cleaning.

        light, small, fills nalgene <10pumps

        • Familiarity:I've put it through the wringer

        carry less water if there are sources, fast action, efficient, lightweight, easy to use, packs small, nalgene adapter is great. I take one filled bottle and a collapsible for camp when out backpacking. Only used in PNW.

        So far, so good

        • Familiarity:I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

        I haven't used this filter enough to have had any real problems with it, but so far, it's exactly what I was looking for. Small, lightweight, and incredibly fast. As long as regular maintenance keeps it running reasonably like it does now, I will continue to be very happy with my decision. If size and weight are a priority, I recommend it.

        High maintenance

        • Familiarity:I've used it several times

        I got this last year and used it once with great success. When I went out recently for a four night trip, it was extremely difficult and slow. It maybe put out about 1/4 L/min. Backflushing helped the speed slightly but I was not impressed. I had a Sweetwater for years until the handle broke, and would go back if I could.



        Pros: Very fast, lightweight, compact

        Cons: High maintenance, low filter life

        not worth the frustration

        • Familiarity:I've put it through the wringer

        Initially planned to use this for a PCT thru-hike and I'm SO glad I didn't. Just normal use on weekend trips makes me swear with frustration in trying to backflush at home in my kitchen, let alone outside. WHY would a company make a product that is so finicky?! You have to get the backflush just right or it won't work and the directions in the package are poor so you have to remember how to do it EXACTLY. I was successfully able to back flush with a lot of fiddling for the first few months, and now it's randomly stopped working. I have followed along with the maintenance video, no luck. Also, notice that in the video the pump is fully extended when he puts it back together in prep for backflush, tells you not to pump, and then the next shot is the pump being extended back out. Frustrating. I also don't take this on long trips because I hate bladder systems and nalgene, and there's no way easy way to back flush without one. It is fast, and compact, and makes great tasting water, but it's easy to loose the lid--it really needs a strap to hold on to it. The stupid prefilter also CONSTANTLY flips upside down making it almost impossible to get water. I either have to tuck it under a branch or stone or hold it in the stream just right. Overall, not worth the hassle.

        MSR Hyperflaw

        • Familiarity:I've put it through the wringer

        As advertised, MSR's Hyperflow pumps water fast and it cuts weight, but design flaws such as the filters need for constant back flushing creates more problems than it solves.



        Out of the box this thing pumps water like nobodies business. It's lightweight and easy to use, but upon closer inspection you will find some some features that seem extraneous or just plan wrong.



        Such as the float end that supposedly keeps the suction side of the hose face down when pumping water, which would be great except it always seemed to do the opposite and roll belly up pumping air into the filter.



        The guide suggests you back flush after every 8 litres. On average I consume 3 litres a day on the trail, and I found back flushing every three days to be a real pain, especially after spending a long day in my boots.



        Be warned: when you don't back flush this filter, it will punish you. With drastically slower pump rates and higher amount of force required to operate the pump mechanism.



        On the flip side, if you're a weekend warrior this might be the perfect filter for you. Backflushing in the sink at home is a breeze, and when this filter is properly maintained it does filter water incredibly fast.



        Bottom line: Lightweight and fast pumping, but design flaws keep this filter from living up to its potential on trips lasting more than four days. I returned mine for a Katadyn Hiker Pro.

        No problems with this filter

        • Familiarity:I've put it through the wringer

        I've used this on several multi-day trips, and countless overnighters over the past few years and it has performed quite admirably.



        I've never replaced the filter, only backflushed a few times when it started to slow down, and it continues to fill a 2 liter water bottle in less than 5 minutes. I've noticed some people claim the filters have a much shorter life than I've observed, all I can say to that is I am always very careful about where I filter water from



        It's light and packs up nicely, but the price of replacement filters (which I fear I'm close to requiring) is unfortunate

        Surprised

          I saw this pump in action this weekend while backpacking at Pictured Rocks in MI. The pump is actually a lot faster than I had originally thought, and packs very small. If I am going to look for a pump in the future, and for some reason cant use the platy, I think I will pick this system up.

          Surprised

          Repost of Maintenance video

          Just reposting the video that shows proper maintenance of the pump. Do this often and the pump will be a beauty!

          Temperamental. "Air lock" seems to be a common culprit. New filter cartridges like the one in Shawn's video are super fast. Then reality sets in after 15-20 days of use. I've had mine for two seasons. Field-backflushing was a primary buying criterion. Now pumping for over a minute per liter leads me to backflush more often than recommended, which leads to more frequent frustration but not the advertized performance. At the price of replacement cartridges, I'll be shopping for an upgrade instead.

          Great, Don't Forget Maintenance

          • Familiarity:I've put it through the wringer

          Alright, to sum up everything below, I will and I will give you my opinion.

          This is a really great little pump, I have used it multiple times over and over again and had to replace a filter a couple times and do some routine maintenance. I love it, it is lightweight and small and useful. Now do not forget that if your water is really bad you will need to double filter this: aka if your water is really ashy or lots of dirt filter that through like a sock or something so your not sending that right into your pump. Also don't forget that this will need routine maintenance to keep it running at a good rate, so check it before every adventure and if its a long one bring a spare filter. It does take some time to filter with this so be patient but it is worth clean water. Over all this is very adequate you just cant forget your maintenance and have some patience with it! I love it!

          Good lightweight filter - no complaints

          • Familiarity:I've used it several times

          I've had this filter since late spring ('12) and have used it several times over the summer on weekend backpacking trips. I haven't had any clogging/ freezing issues that were noted when this filter first came out, and the weight saving vs. some of the other filters on the market is great. Like just about every MSR product I've used, this comes apart into about 6 pieces so servicing it in the field isn't that much of a chore. When using this on a 1-2 night backpacking trip, I generally won't bother with backflushing it until I get home, unless the water is particularly dirty or I'm with a larger group. It is a little more needy than some of the other more bulky filters on the market, but I haven't had to put enough effort into keeping it going to outweigh the benefits.



          One other nice touch - the outlet for fresh water fits exactly with the end of a Camelbak hose with the bite valve removed. This is great for a mid-day water break because I can refill my Camelbak without taking it out of my pack. It also reduces the likelihood of spilling water when pumping in camp.

          I sure tried

            I've got a couple other reviews and comments from throughout the last few years here somewhere, but here's the latest- I am so done with this filter! I owned one of the very first of these sold to the public and it's been a constant mix of really good and really bad ever since. Worked fine at times, but it was always something- filter issues, back flushing issues, cartridge replacements long before they were due (even pumping from pristine sources), dropping and chasing small and numerous parts in creeks issues, pumping problems like vacuum locks and low flow rates... and finally, on our last trip, four strokes and failure (piston froze up almost completely)...my Hyperflow was dead weight that never left my pack again. We would have been totally screwed without another system or boiling. Totally pointless at that moment. I was pissed and irritated for the last time. Now, I do love my MSR Autoflow (the last trip's savior), and when that's not enough, I use and invariably rely on my Katadyn Hiker Pro. I wanted to like this, but the little problems that I was initially willing to overlook just got to be more than I was willing to deal with anymore. We have to trust our filters, and this gets too sketchy sometimes.

            Trash Trash Trash!

              If you're looking for something to use one weekend a year for one person, you're in luck. If you plan to use this more than once in a blue moon, forget it.

              I bought this last year while hiking the Appalachian Trail. It pumped Great for the first day or 3, filtering about 3 to 4 Liters of water, once a day.

              By the end of the 6th day, it was Very difficiult to use. By the end of day 9, it was straight up trash! It is impossible to backwash!

              MAYBE you can backwash it if you saved the stupid Nalgene adapter & actually carry a heavy Nalgene bottle (sorry, 99% of thru-hikers drop these way before the 1/2 way point).

              I wouldn't recommend this to anyone.

              The above post couldn?t be further from the truth. I use this filter regularly in Alaska and even when filtering from a glacier fed river the filter will last a year so long as you back flush it. As for problems back flushing it, I had the same problems then I READ and FOLLOWED the directions and didn?t airlock the pump and it worked fine. The back flush also doesn?t require a Nalgene. The pump also mates with the platypus or any hydration system. And if a platypus doesn?t jive with your ultra-light mentality then you can back wash it from anything that holds water.

              Is there any product information available...

              Is there any product information available that describes the frequency of changing the filters?

              I love the speed of these filters, but...

              I love the speed of these filters, but they say do not freeze them. How could you set this up for below freezing weather? Do you simply take it apart and shake out the filter?

              Best Answer

              You need to be very careful with almost any filter when you are heading into freezing temps, but the precautions are fairly simple. You will want to disassemble the filter every night (or whenever you are going into freezing temps) and dry out component parts and filter as well as possible. Some latent water should not be an issue, but you want to avoid any large amounts. Then pack the filter away in a bag and keep it in the tent with you (I know some people who keep it in the foot of their sleeping bag. All of this may be a little excessive depending on how severe the conditions are, but having a cracked fliter will ruin an otherwise pleasent trip.

              As I look at reviews at Back Country and...

              As I look at reviews at Back Country and other retailers I notice that there are a lot of negative reviews for the HyperFlow, but generaly positive reviews for the AutoFlow Gravity Filter. They both have the same underlying filtering technology, they both require back flushing, yet the reviews are very different. Does this indicate a fundamental problem with the AutoFlow?

              so, with all these bad reviews, how good...

              so, with all these bad reviews, how good is this filter, and is their anything better for about the same price?

              The filter isn't "bad" per se, it just has a limited range of use: 1-2 person trips in areas with fairly clean water. It is incredibly light and small, and mine has worked quite well for me. I haven't experienced any problems with clogging or diminished flow, although I would have to disagree with the quoted L/min rates.

              My new favorite water purification system - Aquamira - is much cheaper and more versatile. If you have your heart set on a filter, obviously it isn't for you, but I find that it is more convenient, efficient, lightweight, and economical and the chemical flavor is minimal.

              Best Answer

              I'll agree with Simon on the flow rate being a little slower than stated, but it is very compact and aside from a Steri-Pen or Miox, it's the lightest thing going. To be fair, the first reviews came from a time prior to the recall of defective filter cartridges. The problem is now solved. I've had mine since they first became available years ago, went through the recall and replaced the defective cartridge, pumped hundreds of liters of water since then without a problem, and only had to install a new one this last season.

              Depending on your water needs on the trail, I've been absolutely thrilled with my MSR AutoFlow. Somewhat of a different animal, but flawless performance, easy all the way around, fast, and best of all, it's something where gravity actually works in my favor.

              I have NEVER had a problem with this filter. I have used it as the primary filter on several (we had secondary water treatment should it fail) on a week long trips with a party of 4-5 and it hasn't missed a beat. The water sources i have used have been from clear running streams to skunky potholes. I do tend to use a coffee filter to help the system from gunking up too quickly and that seems to work great.

              Is there a possibility that you are having...

              Is there a possibility that you are having problems with the pre-filter and not the filter itself? Back flushing doesn't seem to solve it so it would make sense that the problem is elsewhere.

              Best Answer

              One way to find out- see if removing the pre-filter makes it work better. Delivers fine after you back flush then? Tubing is clear? Valves don't have anything lodged in them? O-ring in good shape? Ever dropped it really hard or frozen it? That's about everything else that could possibly go wrong. If it gets back to the pre-filter, take a soft toothbrush and gently scrub it after you soak it for a while, then blow it out in reverse. If it's still giving you problems, replace it. Still not functioning right, replace the cartridge. I just replaced mine a few weeks ago. As per the specs, the old one should've been good for much longer, but I pump crap all too often, and that took care of it immediately.

              How many nanometers does this filter down...

              How many nanometers does this filter down to? I have a LifeSaver 4000 water filter that filters down to 15 nanometers, but is not designed for backpacking and weighs about 30oz. It is a great filter and packs easily, but for weight purposes, it's a little heavy. However, I can't seem to find a filter that filters down to anything less than 0.2 micrometers or 200 nanometers.

              Best Answer

              I agree with phil maher completely. 0.2 Microns is more than sufficient to get out all of the 'bad stuff' in backcountry water...the stuff that will make you sick (particulates (dirt), protozoa (giardia and crypto), and bacteria (campylobacter is the smallest pathogenic bacteria in backcountry water at 0.2 microns). Viruses that are typically about 0.01 microns, or 10 nanometers in diameter, simply can't be taken out of the water effectively mechanically. Chemicals such as Chlorine Dioxide, Sodium Hypochlorite, and even Iodine (though iodine will make the water taste horrible) do so very easily within about 5 minutes per liter to EPA standard (99.9999%). The issues with a backcountry water filters not only deal with what they can take out efficiently, but how they perform over a certain period of time. As important as efficacy, one has to consider pump volume, size, weight, ease of use, can it be serviced and maintained in the field with little mechanical knowledge, etc. The Hyperflow does all of these well once the basic tenants of this filter are understood. The HyperFlow isn't great for heavily sedimented water or one with a large amount of humic acid or blue-green algae (substances that are notorious for clogging filters...the MiniWorks EX is a better choice). I consider the HyperFlow to be the best high mountain filter available.

              It is smart to do some research on the types of water you'll encounter in the area you'll be hiking/backpacking however. This should play a part in what filter you buy.

              I understand that the recall may have been...

              I understand that the recall may have been a cause of some of the bad reviews, Does the new cartridge fix its shortfalls?

              This was recommended by tech at REI over...

              This was recommended by tech at REI over the MSR Mini because technology is "more advanced". Curious about difference regarding chemicals, doesnt seem that the hyperflow strains these like the Mini? surprised this isnt more impactful on Backpacker asessment.

              Best Answer

              Neither will filter out CHEMICALS. The Mini might have a smaller pore size and is arguably more reliable, but you should be getting about the same quality water out of each pump. There might be less of a weird taste with the mini because of its filter type (ceramic) but that's not to say you won't be getting any chemicals that are in the water. I'm partial to the mini - I've had one for years and it's been great.

              Hi there.

              There are certainly a lot of differences between the MiniWorks and the HyperFlow filters. Ignoring differences like weight (the Hyperflow weighs half what the MiniWorks does), pumping action (the Hyperflow is like a bike pump, the MinWorks has a handle pump), filtration rate (the HyperFlow says 3 L/min, the MiniWorks 1 L/min), and cleaning methods (the HyperFlow is a backflush, the MiniWorks you brush the ceramic), let's look at the filters themselves.

              The MiniWorks uses a ceramic carbon-cored filter cartridge, with pores up to 0.2 microns in size. The ceramic takes care of particulates, bacteria and protozoa, and the carbon core removes some taste-causing chemicals, such as iodine or tannins.

              The HyperFlow uses hollow fibre technology, which has a larger surface area for a given volume - this is how the HyperFlow can have such a high flowrate and be so small. The pore size is still up to 0.2 microns, so it's still effective for particulates, bacteria, and protozoa. The HyperFlow doens't have a carbon element though, so there isn't any removal of funny tasts from the water.

              As for whether having a carbon element is important - that's up to you, and where you'll be getting water from. Some peopel hate the taste of chemicals in their water. Many backpackers add chemicals to their water to purify it (chlorine/iodine), rather than remove them.

              Happy backcountry travel!

              Don't rely on any packable filter for chemical removal. The small amount of charcoal in the filter is no match for truly polluted water. It's only there to improve taste, and I doubt it even lasts very far into the rated life of the cartridge.

              Write your question here...How do you use...

              Write your question here...How do you use it? It doesn't have any instructions.

              I've seen that some people have had troubles...

              I've seen that some people have had troubles with this pump slowing down after using it several times, I have also seen that when it is back flushed it fixes this problem, has anyone had a similar experience where it works fine after being backflushed?

              Also, it would only be used by 1 or 2 people over about five days.

              Hey All, I'm looking for a new filter and...

              Hey All, I'm looking for a new filter and this one seems to fit but The big question is what will it filter down to, .4 .3 .2 @3 litters per minute I'm scared to just jump into this thing. Signed, Damn Bears

              Best Answer

              The HyperFlow’s 0.2-micron filter is effective against bacteria, protozoa, and particulate matter. Like all non-chemical filters it does not protect against viruses. The HyperFlow does not have a charcoal filter to treat chemical contamination, so water drawn from particularly dirty sources may retain some odor and/or flavor.I got it to filter out cryptosporidium which it does very effectively.

              Question for the first to review this? I...

              Question for the first to review this? I know this is supposed to be the hot new filter. I wnet to MSR web-site and looked at instructions. They say do not pump any kind of dirty water throught it----did you try----or is it pristine water only?

              Also the instructions show a 9 step back-flushing process that you must do every 8 liters or one day. It looked complicated and I go with groups on overnight trips where we pump way more than 8 liters at a time. Question 2. How did you do on the backflushing? thanks, Dee

              It is always advisable to pump the cleanest water available but not mandatory. The 8L back flushing is recommend to keep the filter pumping at full capacity but you can get away with going longer with possibly a slight decrease in flow rate. The back flushing process is not that complex once you do it a couple of times.Good info here:http://www.msrgear.com/support/watertreatment.asp