Description

Reliable warmth in a layer that weighs less than a can of soda.

If the MontBell Men's Ultralight Thermawrap Jacket were a prize fighter, it would bring the heat in the sub-nine ounce category of insulated jackets. Lightweight shell material and synthetic insulation keep this jacket ultralight and highly packable. Whether you're layering under a shell for a bike ride downtown in the winter, or planning a multi-day hut hopping trip, this jacket brings reliable core warmth amidst variable cold-weather conditions.

  • Exceloft synthetic insulation retains its warmth even when wet and it compresses easily
  • Ballistic Airlight nylon shell material brings supreme durability and packability in a lightweight package
  • Polkatex DWR treatment allows the shell material to repel light moisture and precipitation
  • Fleece-lined collar keeps your chin and neck comfortable despite winter's chill

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MontBell Ultralight Thermawrap Insulation Jacket - Men's

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Here's what others have to say...

4 5

Warmth for a Phoenix dude

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: True to size

in Phoenix it never gets really cold. So for a light layer to take on a road trip to Utah this is perfect. Fits well and true, has a nice slick look, stuffs away easily. Nice piece for the price

4 5

Great jacket for it's purpose

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: True to size

This is a great jacket if used for it's intended purpose.

It is excellent while being very active in temps to the low 30's as it has very good wind resistance. In fact, I'd say that is it's greatest strength - for 9oz you get near perfect wind resistance and modest insulation. It compares pretty well in this regard to the Marmot Dri-clime, but this has pockets, which is a plus.

For idle time, this jacket doesn't hold up as well. I would not be comfortable in camp in temps lower than 45ish with just this jacket and moderate baselayer. Of course you could extend that be wearing a beefier baselayer, which I did on one of my trips. But the jacket fits snugly, so if you want heavy base layers, better size up.

I also tried this jacket on during the night in an attempt to extend the range of my quilt. It fared OK in this regard, but didn't add much warmth. Would have been better off with a fleece or down puffy of some sort.

The jacket only weighs 9oz (medium), and fits very well (I'm 5' 9", 160lb). Instead of draw cords, it uses stretchy panels in the cuffs and hem to give a snug fit, which works well. The collar is lined with micro fleece which is nice.

The DWR finish is very good, shedding the light to moderate rain I encountered easily (I was actually surprised by how well it held up TBH).

Bottom line, I'd recommend this jacket to anyone looking for a very light jacket to shed wind and offer modest warmth in cool conditions (not too cold).

5 5

Great Ultra light jacket

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've had this jacket for over 3 years now and it shows absolutely no signs of wear. This was my first montbell jacket and fell in love with both the jacket and Montbell immediately. The jacket is perfect for 3 season use or 4 season as part of a layering system or during strenuous activity. It breathes well for an insulation layer. I usually find myself bringing this in temps down to the mid 40's and anything below I'll use my Alpine Light down jacket. It packs down so small though and weighs almost nothing so you will find yourself just throwing it in your bag "just in case". Great jacket and extremely versatile. Get it and you won't be sorry.

Great Ultra light jacket
Responded on

My wife liked it so much that she stole it from me several times when we were backpacking in Europe.

5 5

Excellent versatile jacket

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Both my son and I have one of these - very light, packable and quite warm for its weight - wear them as a layer under shell when skiing, as a warm up layer backcountry skiing and as a casual jacket around town - note that there are warmer jackets from Mont Bell if you need something super warm look at a higher fill weight down jacket like the Frost Smoke Parka which weights 12 oz has a hood and is very warm (I have one of those also when I need something warmer and it is also an excellent product) - I have a 3 year old model in medium - I'm 5'7" 150 and it fits great - my son has this year's model and it is roomier - he is 5'10" 170 and medium fits him well

I'm 6.1, 165, 31" waist, broad shoulders,...

I'm 6.1, 165, 31" waist, broad shoulders, 34"/35" sleeve, short torso -- basically, tall and lean. Would a medium fit me?

Responded on

A medium would be tight in the shoulders/chest for you I'm sure. I'm 5.9, 160 with 41" chest and it's near perfect. If I was any broader in the shoulders, it would be tight.

5 5

great for the weight

Bought this for a multi-day bike hut trip, trying to go as light as possible but still be warm!

This jacket has a nice minimalist approach, with the added touches of a fleece lined collar and pocket zippers. Other good features included the length (below the waist, longer over the backside), and great freedom of movement for arms. Sleeves are longer than usual (size L), which I liked. Fits well under a cycling raincoat. Dries really fast. A down jacket would be warmer at the weight, but not as versatile when you know you're going to get wet.

4 5

New model

This jacket is now listed at 9.3 oz on the Montbell site, so the stats on the BC site are still last years model. Bummer that they are adding zippers to the pockets on their jackets/parkas. Just added weight, and for what?

Responded on

.5 oz makes exactly zero difference on the trail. zippers on pockets are useful for keeping out drafts.

Responded on

Caleb, I agree...for those that are not necessarily concerned with weights, but for those that are, it is a big deal. It is such a small difference that it doesn't directly matter...but it is also a step in the wrong direction for a "UL" piece. Before we know it MB will have all sorts of bells and whistles that serve no real purpose on these jackets other than simply adding weight but it will still be called "UL"...

As far as keeping out drafts...my UL Down Inner parka has the same pockets without a zipper and I have not had any problems with drafts sneaking in them.

So, again, I ask why do they need zippers?

Responded on

I agree about the zippers. I've decided to purchase a similar product by a competing manufacturer - the "pullover" variety. I love my UL Down Inner and I think the company has made leaps and bounds in the UL clothing industry, but for my needs they should have kept the style/features of the old jacket.

I can't count how many times I've passed up gear because of half an ounce or how many times I've had to make modifications (which voids most warranties)to shave a few grams.

Responded on

sure, if you're wearing it and the load is distributed, but what about in your pack? the consensus is that if all your layers end up having pockets you have 0.5oz * 4 or 6, and 2 to 3 oz in your pack is a lot. So UL should be minimal zipper. if you're so worried about drafts I guess tape them shut or put on a windshell, as is designed to be worn over an insulating jacket anyway.

Responded on

I'm still don't buy the u.l. weight-weenie philosophy. i would go so far as to say a pound or two in either direction won't make a lick of difference on the trail, wether it's an overnight or a 2500-mile through-hike.

just be reasonable. is a 50-lb pack too heavy? yup. if im under or around 25 lbs will i be in good shape for pretty much indefinite mileage? yup. an ounce or two here or there is simply irrelevant. counting grams is more of an obsession than a strategy.

with the above in mind, i think the zippers are a reasonable, useful feature that add irrelevant weight, even for the weight-conscious (which I am).

Responded on

Whether or not if a pound or two extra will make a bit of difference when on the trail is irrelevant to the fact that they are taking a piece that they specifically call "UL" and adding a bunch of bells and whistles to it. The whole point of being "UL" is to take only what is needed to be safe and comfortable. The zippers on the pocket will not provide me with either safety or comfort, which means that they are pointless, and completely against what "UL" actually is. All I am saying is to call it what it is...

As well, as has been mentioned, it is these little things that will turn some customers away, however, I feel like the "UL" crowd is quite smaller than the traditional crowd, so I don't guess this will affect MB too bad. I myself cut out the bottom hem cord on my MBULDIP since it was not necessary, and it saved me about 0.3 oz. Does it make a huge difference? Nope, not by itself. But after I did this with all the items in my pack, the difference was noticeable.