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Description

It's winter outside but summery in here!

Shiver is a nasty six-letter word that the Marmot Ouray Women's 0-Degree Sleeping Bag wouldn't recognize; this super-warm and lightweight bag just crushes the cold of winter without breaking a sweat. Rather than simply renaming a men's sleeping bag and tossing it out there, Marmot's engineers added down insulation right where testers said they felt the coldest, and gave the Ouray a trapezoidal footbox to heat your toes more efficiently. It also has an insulated five-baffle hood, down collar, face muff that seal up tight so your brain doesn't freeze during the frigid mountain nights.

That's not the end of it. The Ouray also uses stretchy baffles that let you move around comfortably, and has a trapezoidal footbox that's designed to keep your toes extra-warm when temps are extra-cold. An insulted draft tube prevents cold air from sneaking in through the zipper, and ground-level side seams help prevent all your hard-earned warm air from sneaking out. There's a little stash pocket, too, so you can keep your essential whatnots and thingamajigs close by, and two-way locking zippers so you don't come undone in the middle of the night and wake up hypothermic.

  • 0-degree EN comfort rating
  • 650-fill down with Down Defender water-resistant treatment
  • Mummy bag with ground-level side seams
  • Women's-specific design with strategic insulation
  • 40D nylon ripstop fabric
  • Five-baffle Nautilus drawcord hood, insulated draft tube, and face muff
  • Trapezoidal footbox construction
  • Stretch tricot baffles
  • Stash pocket
  • Hang loops

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Marmot Ouray Sleeping Bag: 0 Degree Down - Women's

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

A very close true 0 degree bag

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I'm 5ft 5 1/2in, 110lbs and I don't produce body heat when I sleep.

Now that Down filled sleeping bags are almost fully superior over Synthetic bags with it's hydrophobic treatments I wanted to go with a Down bag. After tons of research I decided to get this bag because I am a cold sleeper and was looking for a 0 degree bag that is actually a zero degree bag. For those who aren't very familiar with sleeping bag ratings and European Norm ratings, the manufacturer degree rating is the lower limit rating that will keep you alive but not very comfortable at all. The European Norm rating will be the comfort rating. I wanted a comfort rating 0 degree bag and this was the closest I could find at 4 degree F. It is a little heavier that other 0 degree ratings, but the comfort rating is closer to 0 than other bags. I took it up into the high Uintah mountains in Utah in July the day I got it and the first night was 30F and I was toasty warm. I had to unzip the bag to let out some heat and I slept great while my friends who brought 30-45 degree bags did not sleep as good. I haven't had to opportunity to try it out on a 0 F night yet, but I'm sure I'll be happy I got this bag when that night happens.
Cons:
It is a little heavy for a 0 degree bag.
It doesn't have an internal pocket to hold your phone or whatnot to keep it warm and easily found, which is a huge negative for me.
It is a 650 down-fill instead of 800+ (which would make it lighter and still be 0 degrees).

Overall I would HIGHLY recommend this sleeping bag for cold sleepers who want a true 0 degree F sleeping bag more than a lighter weight 0 degree bag.

I see that the max user height for the...

I see that the max user height for the long is 5'10". I'm 5'10" exactly, does that mean it will fit (comfortably), or should I go for a different bag?

Best Answer Responded on

For winter camping you definitely want something slightly longer than yourself. You will be putting layers in the sleeping bag, a lot of times boot liners too. This is the best and easiest way to dry things out when you are camping. Take a look at http://www.backcountry.com/mountain-hardwear-phantom-0-womens-sleeping-bag-0-degree-down?ti=UExQIENhdDotNDAgdG8gNCBEZWdyZWUgRG93biBTbGVlcGluZyBCYWdzOjE6MjpiY3NDYXQ3MTExMDA2&skid=MHW2373-RY-REGZIP their regular is 6'. May be more money but, its a lot lighter as they use much better quality of down.

5 5

Great, Warm Women's Sleeping Bag

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I?m 5'6 1/2" tall, clothing size XL, broad shoulders; I get cold when I sleep. The Women's Ouray Long fits me perfectly with room for clothes etc. at the feet and no binding at the shoulders. It kept me toasty warm on snow at 19F using only one ground pad and wearing expedition long johns, wool socks and no hat. Very comfortable, cushy, supportive bag. Drawstrings are easy to use. With two ground pads and extra layers I believe I could use this bag down to its 4F degree EN rating. This is on of very few Women's sleeping bags EN Comfort rated down near zero. It?s not the lightest or most compressible sleeping bag in the universe, but it costs a lot less than one of those high tech bags with 900-fill down and, in my opinion, is fine for backpacking. As an aside, the men's rating is -11F, so a man (or one of my boys) could probably use the Ouray as a -15 bag.

5 5

excellent very warm bag

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I needed a warm bag for trekking in the Himalaya and after a lot of research, I settled on this bag. It was way too warm at lower elevations (anything below 14,000 feet) but it made an excellent duvet unzipped! When it was cold (and it was near zero), I was very comfortable. For a mummy bag I was very impressed with how much I could wiggle around. This was important for me because I move about A LOT when I sleep and my old mummy bag was not nearly as forgiving. I ordered the long length even though I'm only 5'6". On cold nights, I sleep with a lot of stuff I don't want to freeze, so the extra length helped. There were a couple of minor drawbacks: the zipper snags (but I haven't found a bag that doesn't) and I did need to patch a substantial hole from a particularly violent zipper battle, and it's a bit heavy...but then I wasn't willing to shell out for a lighter WM bag, so...