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  • Mammut - Smart Belay Device - Graphite/Red

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  • Mammut - Smart Belay Device - Graphite/Red

Mammut Smart Belay Device


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    • Graphite/Red, One Size

    44 Reviews


    Catch big falls easily.

    The Mammut Smart Belay Device locks at en extremely low force, so you can catch your friend's massive whippers with ease. This unique belay device also works on anything from an 8.9 to a 10.5mm rope, so you're not stuck with something that doesn't work when you get to the crag.
    • Item #MAM0164

    Tech Specs

    Auto Locking
    Rope Diameter
    8.9 - 10.5 mm
    Recommended Use
    rock climbing
    Manufacturer Warranty
    1 year

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Lousy service from backcountry

      I receive the item from backcountry but the item is detached from the packing. I'm very sure the item is already detached when put in to the box as the cable tie attaching the item to the packaging is not found in the box. Can't believe backcountry will ship out items in this manner. This is a safety device for climbing and I'm not even sure whether this item has dropped or used. Extremely disappointed with backcountry.

      Lousy service from backcountry

      Great except for a serious defect

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      Despite "assisted locking" classification it fully locks. Very easy to use for top rope. Trickier to pay out rope for lead but you just got to get the hang of it.
      Worst thing is that the climber's rope can catch the thumb hook. This causes it to lock but you can't uncatch it, so if the climber is hanging you're stuck, unable to lower them or escape the belay.

      Great except for a serious defect

      Also, if it did happen by some chance, the climber could climb up the belayers side of rope to take weight off the rope while you straighten out your belay device. I've done this before when I got my braids caught in a GriGri, after catching a huge lead fall. ( Don't let your friends climb with long braids!)

      Better than the GriGri

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      I have never been a fan of the GriGris, so when I discovered this belay device for leading. It was instantly in love with the Smart belay device. It works just like a normal ATC which is really nice and simple. But the assisted braking makes a world of difference when a fall happens. With a nice handle for the brake hand, its easy to always keep a hand on the rope and feed rope. Simply push the handle down and the rope is locked in with no-slip. My go to!

      This has become my favorite lead device

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      This has become my favorite belay belay device for lead climbing because it feeds rope so smoothly and lowers with almost no rope burn. This is one of three auto assist belay devices I own (along with a GriGri 2 and Mega Jul), and it is the device I find my self grabbing most often.

      The Mammut Smart is the best of both the GriGri and the Mega Jul. It is much lighter than the GriGri and somewhat easier to use. It is a lot larger than the Mega Jul, but not unreasonably heavy. The size of the tool comes from the large lever in the front, which provides just the right amount of leverage on the rope to smoothly lower a climber and protect hands from rope burn.

      For single rope climbing, this is the all-around best device I have used.

      Not exactly a grigri, but better.

      • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

      I bought one of these after reading a copy of the 2013 accidents in american alpinism and how many accidents were caused by inattentive or incapacitated belayers failing to arrest falls. Compared to a gri-gri, this thing is significantly lighter and cheaper, which is a bonus. However, with new, thin ropes the smart may not fully lock hands free, which is why it's technically only "auto-assist" as opposed to "auto-lock." However, I feel that the added safety is significant compared to an ATC.

      Some usage notes: The belay technique that works best for me is to leave my right hand on the brake lever with my thumb hooked underneath so I can push out (not up!) to release slack, or use my hand to grab the rope and lock it down. I use my left hand to pay out slack without taking my right off the brake, trying to feed like an ATC will jam the device more often than not. Additionally, use a large round stock biner like the Petzl HMS William for better results, especially with fat ropes. Additionally, you can belay a second with this by attaching it directly to the anchor, however, it is not recommended to do this by the manufacturer because it significantly degrades the locking capability. However, from personal experience it works well, like an ATC plus a little bit.

      Once you get one of these you will be one of the Smart people and you can come to our secret meetings.

      I like this more than the Smart Alpine, but then I have to carry a second device to rappel. I am not fond of lowering a second with the alpine. I haven't found a belay device I like better than this.

      Perfect belay device

      • Familiarity: I've used it several times

      This device is amazing, personally I would rate it higher than a GriGri because it's so easy to feed slack to a climber, and it's lighter and way cheaper. So easy to operate and makes belaying much easier compared to an ATC even. This has quickly become my go to device and one of my favorite tools on my rack. I would definitely recommend anyone in the market for a great belay device get this and get an ATC for rappel, that's really all you need. There's really no reason to spend all that money for a Gri Gri when you can get this for a fraction of the price. Good luck, and safe climbing!

      The perfect device to accompany an ATC

        If you have an ATC or any other non-locking belay device that goes along with this one then you are all set! Use this device for belaying climbers and your other tubular device for your rappels. Why? Because this device is everything the Gri Gri is not. It feeds out slack on a lead belay smoother than any other device. It weighs significantly less. And the price seals the deal. I was looking for a device that was auto locking, well priced, reliable, durable, and light on my harness. The two devices I had in my sights were the Smart Belay and the Mega Jul. I tried both for top roping and leading at the gym. The Mega Jul was sticky and the rope drag along the thumb when feeding slack out was uncomfortable, but the versatility was extremely attractive. But when I tried the Smart Belay the contest was over, the rope channel took care of that thumb rubbing on the rope, it was super SUPER smooth, smoother than any other device, even smoother than my Reverso. The only thing that it doesn't have is the capability to rappel on a double strand of rope, and it is a bit heavier. But between my Reverso and this device, I believe I have the two best belay devices on the market. I can get it all done with the most comfortable performance and best price available for the function. I just put my other belay device away and used my friends Smart Belay until I bought my own... It's that good.

        Great, lightweight belay device

        • Familiarity: I've used it several times

        The single-rope Smart belay device is perfect for belaying top rope and single-pitch sport. It took me about 2-3 lead belays to get used to paying out slack for clipping, but now I prefer it to an ATC.

        The only thing that is taking time for me to get used to is paying out slack right after taking in slack (happens a lot indoors with closely-spaced clips). After you've taken in slack, your brake hand is below the device, but to pay out slack you have to move your brake hand back up to the device. What the manufacturer recommends you do is to move your brake hand up the rope back to the device while maintaining a "tunnel" with your fingers such that the rope is always within your brake hand. It can feel sketchy at first but it's perfectly safe if you do it right.

        Great alternative to a GriGri

        • Familiarity: I've used it several times

        When I first started to learn lead climbing in a gym I was having a difficult time with the GriGri and I kept shorting the climber I was belaying (which is a no no). My friend had this smart device and let me try it out. After belaying with it for only two routes I was sold! It was so much easier to feed rope to the climber while still having the locking feature I love since many of the people I climb with weigh more than me. I would definitely recommend for indoor climbing, but outside I still love my GriGri.

        Great Product

        • Familiarity: I've used it several times

        I've only ever used this product in a gym, but it functions very well. It allows you to let rope out and take it back very easily, while still locking if your climber falls. It feels as safe as a grigri, but with a much nicer pricetag. I would highly recommend this product.

        Middle of the Road is a good place to be

        • Familiarity: I've used it several times

        After a harrowing experience tarnished my self confidence with a grigri, my climbing mentor suggested I try the Smart Belay Device. I really like the auto-lock for an added safeguard that I enjoyed with the grigri, but feel a lot more comfortable belaying lead climbs with the similar muscle memories that I've developed with years of using an ATC. I think this is a good compromise between the two.

        It takes a minute to get used to the lowering motion without jerking your climber around, but that's no biggie.

        This is definitely the device that I like to have my friends use when I'm showing them how to belay for the first time.

        I went cheap and bought this one, but I'd recommend the double holed model, so that it's more functional for rappelling and multi-pitch climbs and so that you don't have to carry another piece of equipment with you. I'm giving it 4 stars for that reason, and because of the fact that this doesn't fit all ropes.


          I bought this about 8 months ago and it is awesome. Worth the money. I actually like using it better than the Grigri belay. It is head over heels better than a regular ATC. It is great for top roping also especially when someone is hang dogging working a route.


            I see that Mammut's Smart Alpine belay device rope diameter range is limited to ropes of 8.9 millimeters to 10.5 mm. It's a shame it can't manage my Mammut 8.5 mm Genesis doubles. Mammut, are you planning a smaller size version to expand on the two you sell currently? Does anyone know of a good similar device (auto locking assist for doubles) on the market? I seem to have seen one once but cannot find it now. Thanks.

            Best belay device I've used

            • Familiarity: I've used it several times

            I have the 2 rope and single rope versions of the Mammut Smart Belay, and I love them. I've been using various versions of the ATC for many years, and the smart belay works almost identical to an ATC - so all my muscle memory already knows how to use it safely. (unlike a grigri which requires different muscle memory than an ATC)

            In the gym, I'm more confident knowing that my belayer will always catch my fall (because the device will catch automatically). I also find it easier and faster to feed rope to a lead climber than with ATC (or ATC guide). And, it's easier to control the descent (for lowering or rappelling) with less friction on my hand due to the "handle" taking much of the friction.

            Better braking, auto catching, easier feeding, light, inexpensive. I can't think of anything wrong with it. I recommend this as a replacement for the ATC for sport and trad use.

            More dynamic than a Gri-Gri

            • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

            One thing I've noticed other reviews missing is how much better it is for catching falls on trad lead. Since gri-gris stop so instantly it puts a lot more of the shock on your protection, whereas the smart gives a little slip to help ease it. This is a great help when your last piece was sketchy or you're ice climbing.

            A smart middle ground

            • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

            I always hated lead belaying with a gri-gri. I've used the Smart several times in the gym and it seems like a good compromise between having a device that autolocks (though I wouldn't trust it to lock as I do a grigri) with the ease of use of an ATC (though not AS easy since the rope sometimes slips off the central groove and gets caught).

            I'm interested in how it behaves when belaying someone from the top during multi-pitch climbs. Anyone used this device in that situation?

            Good to know! My smrt is still in transit, slogging over ground shipping, so I haven't had a chance to read any of the specifications. BackCountry, why isn't this available online? Especially with technical gear like this, it would be good to read the intended use policy.

            While watching some videos of this device...

            While watching some videos of this device I've noticed people have issues keeping the break rope in the groove along the top of the horn and instead are having it come off and to the right (in right-handed belay situations). My question is: Is this an issue that will inhibit the device from locking if the person falls. And if so is it something that just becomes natural so it no longer is an issue? Or is the horn only used when letting them come down the wall/rapping.

            Having the rope come off the horn at the bottom of the device is not a problem when belaying. The device still locks up perfectly. The horn is only really necessary to lower someone with the device. With out it, it would be very hard to lower someone because of the way the device locks up. So when lowering you just put the rope on the horn groove and use the horn to leverage the device out the locked position.

            is this similar to the grigri? if it is...

            is this similar to the grigri?
            if it is wouldn't this be the smarter choice because its like 1/3 the price of a grigri

            Has anybody there used the mammut smart...

            Has anybody there used the mammut smart belay device? How well does it feed on lead belays? How well does it hold a heavier partner using a skinny rope? Thanks.

            Best Answer

            I would have to say I disagree with Angus. It feeds 100x better than a grigri. If you want to get a feel for how easily it feeds just clip a rope with a locker and that is how smoothly it feeds. I have used one to leadbelay and I have to say that I am very impresed and I intend on buying one sometime in the future.

            I found a belay device review in climbing, but it did not include the Smart device. I am curious to know if Angus is comparing the feeding to old-style or new-style Gri-gri belaying. The old Gri-gri belay style where people hold in the braking device does make feeding easy but is patently unsafe.

            i have one of those devices. I always like things that are light, and really simple. Grigris are great for lots of things too. I like the Smart a lot because it's a single piece, and super light. I find it feeds great, locks off on all sizes basically the same as a Grigri.

            Great device, like a grigri but not. Bottom line is that this device is not for newbies. Works like a charm when you've belayed for a while but the average newbie would have trouble. The wrong combination of moves means a friction-free fall that me lead to some burned hands from rope grabbing if there isn't any quick thinking involved.