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  • La Sportiva - Trango Cube GTX Mountaineering Boot - Men's - Blue/Red
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  • La Sportiva - Trango Cube GTX Mountaineering Boot - Men's - Blue/Red
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La Sportiva Trango Cube GTX Mountaineering Boot - Men's

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    4.556

    6 Reviews

    Details

    An ultra-light, climate-controlled mountaineer boot.

    Winner of the Gear Institute's Best New Gear award at the Outdoor Retailers Summer 2013 show,  the all-new, incredibly light La Sportiva Men's Trango Cube GTX Mountaineering Boot makes your extreme high-altitude pursuits heavenly. The Gore-Tex insert ensures that water won't slip into the boot and tank your toes midway towards the apex of Gannett Peak, and part of the tongue comes out when you need more room for your foot. Direct-inject lacing system and an exclusive Vibram sole lightens your load so you can pack an extra chocolate bar (or 6) to celebrate the summit.

    Put together without seams, the uppers blend waterproof QB3 and FlexTec 2 fabrics to keep external water away from your toes. A rugged Vibram rubber rand protects your toes, wards off water, and rounds out this stable shoe when the trail takes a new twist on technical. The direct-inject Thermo-Tech TPU lacing system keeps seams at bay for extended durability while shaving off nearly 1/3 of the weight of traditional riveted lacing systems. Gore-Tex Performance Comfort lining guarantees a waterproof, breathable climate-controlled environment for your foot whether you're learning to self-arrest on ice or starting out well below the snow line.

    A low-profile 4mm graded nylon insole puts a skinny pillow under your heel and has a barely-there feel by the time it reaches your toes. A combination of materials create a stable platform for hiking without taking away underfoot cushioning. Opposing lugs of the Impact Brake System offer traction for the trek up and trip down. ONE, an exclusive sole made by Vibram for La Sportiva, keeps the weight off and the silhouette on the down-low. The TPU heel insert allows the Trango take a hybrid crampon for quick changes to accommodate the hyper-variable environment.

    • Gore-Tex Performance Comfort lining, guaranteed waterproof and breathable
    • QB3 waterproof fabric and FlexTex 2 fabric upper
    • Vibram rubber rand
    • Adjustable, variable fit tongue
    • 3D Flex technology
    • Thermo-Tech injection TPU lacing system, PU eyelets
    • 4mm graded nylon insole
    • EVA midsole in central zone and heel
    • PU midsole in toe and heel
    • Impact Brake System, directionally opposed lugs
    • La Sportiva "ONE" by Vibram (exclusive)
    • TPU insert for rear crampon attachment
    • Item #LSP000C

    Tech Specs

    Shell Material
    [upper] QB3, FlexTec2, [rand] Vibram rubber
    Waterproofing
    Gore-Tex Performance Comfort
    Closure
    laces with speed hooks
    Lining
    Gore-Tex Performance Comfort
    Crampon Compatibility
    strap-on
    Sole
    Vibram ONE with Impact Brake System
    Midsole
    [toe, heel] PU, [central zone, heel] EVA
    Footbed
    [4mm] nylon
    Claimed Weight
    24 oz
    Recommended Use
    mountaineering
    Manufacturer Warranty
    1 year

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Good Boot but Short Length-Wise

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times
    • Fit: Runs small
    • Size Bought: 45

    I'm a 11 street shoe, 11.5 running shoe. I went with a size 45 which according to La Sportiva's shoe chart that should be the equivalent of a 11.25 size. The width was a little too snug at first but after breaking them in it is exactly where I want it for a technical rock boot. The instep is shallow though after using superfeet green insoles. The biggest issue I have with this boot is the length. It actually comes up shorter than my size 11 Asolo hiking boots and size 11 Tennies (the irony, a mountaineering boot that has a more precise fit than approach shoes). The difference in length isn't too big but on steep descents I fear for my toes and I wouldn't dare climb ice in them. I don't know if going up to a 45.5 is a wise idea because the width fit would become sloppy and I lose my edging.

    I wish La Sportiva was a little better at their sizing.

    Best Boot ever!

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
    • Fit: True to size
    • Size Bought: 12.5

    The fit of these boots is flat out remarkable. I 'm a 12 in running shoes and a 45/46 in climbing shoes; I bought a half bigger to wear 2 pair of thick wool socks. No blisters at all, not even a hot spot. My foot is average across the ball and a bit narrow in the heel. I walked them in the foothills for five or six days being aware of normal foot problems with new boots... there were None... I've been climbing for over 50 years and have had access to the best climbing gear out there; La Sportiva has out done them self's with this boot. Up hill with weight (50/55 lbs) my feet were happy, kicking secure steps in Sierra cement for clients easy, post holing ( with gaitors ) a grunt, yet compacting and producing an edge under the surface to stand up on was easier with the sharp edge of these wonders... Plunge stepping down ,I felt under full control as I did long ago in Super Guides or Makalu Doubles. They are so light, it's almost like I'm wearing a trail running shoe, so connected and with persuasion edging. On to rock, 5.6/5.7 is fun on the tips... I'm old school, so, edging comes naturally to me as with Kronhofers or Spiders; not super stiff though, the rocker across the ball of the foot is on a slight diagonal which presents a very natural feeling foot fall .
    I can't say enough about these boots, totally water proof, the lacing is simple and quick; there is a lock on the lace at the ankle that allows for exacting tension. It does require a bit of break in above the ankles, so start off lacing lower at first... I've put at least 65 to 75 miles on them and gone from 9000 to 13500 four or five times in the last month; my feet are the happiest they ever been.
    Blizzards in May and post holing in June, a crazy start to the Sierra season; I'm enjoying our mountains to the fullest because of these boot! Really, I'm not kiddin".


















    Light, fast, versatile

    • Size Bought: 45.5

    I have used the Trango Cube GTXs for a week in the Boston Basin in WA, climbing WA Pass, mixed climbing for several days in the Wasatch, and a week on the highest volcanoes in Ecuador. I love these boots, and they are solid trekking fast, slogging through the mud in WA after endless days of rain, mixed climbing with BD Sabretooth crampons, or many climbs on 5.7+ rock. I have not had them sustained low temps without high activity, but I wear them every time I can if I don't think I need more protection from pretty cold temps.

    Light, fast, versatile

    Well worth the investment

    • Familiarity: I've used it several times
    • Fit: True to size
    • Size Bought: 43.5

    I'll preface this review by saying that I'm incredibly cheap. I go for no-name brand cheapo stuff, or buy at a discount (I love steepandcheap) for everything. In fact, these boots are literally the only piece of outdoor gear or clothing that I have that I paid full price for. I returned my hiking boots and sold my Xbox to finance them. And they're totally worth it.
    Right out of the box, the first thing I noticed was how incredibly light they are. They also fit my low-profile feet very well (with most boots I can tighten them so that the lace loops are almost touching, these lace up light they're supposed to) but still have a roomy toe box.
    I ordered them for a late-season attempt on the Pickets, but it was cancelled due to weather, so instead I figured I'd break them in hiking up to the Coleman glacier with my girlfriend. I expected to get blisters given how stiff the sole is, but I finished the 6 mile trek (mostly hiking with some scrambling) with perfectly comfortable feet. I even wore them for some slightly sketchy stream crossings, and with my gaiters on my feet stayed dry (a concern given how the Trango S Evo tends to get soaked through).
    No local shops carried them, so for sizing I tried on a Trango S Evo with a pair of medium-weight hiking socks. I wear a size 10 street shoe. The fit feels identical to the Trango S Evo.
    Also, note that the lace loop right below the nylon loop shown in the pictures is locking, with helps with holding your foot in place.

    Pros: Lightweight, stiff, comfortable, no break-in period required, waterproof
    Cons: Expensive, color pattern not for everyone (but I love it!)

    The plastic lace loops seem pretty solid, but it remains to be seen how they hold up banging against rocks.

    In conclusion, I would definitely recommend these as a lightweight boot for summer mountaineering or highly aerobic mountain activities where lack of insulation isn't a concern.

    I am so with you man, my middle name is "70% discount" but after some research and trials, I went for those for only 20% off. Went on a wet 10 mile hike (Iceland) in grass/swamp/rock the day after the purchase and zero problems - and completely dry. Amazing shoes. I also have the La Sportiva Nepal old ones, they are heavier and stiffer but warm and great on glaciers and ice-climbing but the Trango Cube is the answer when you can go lighter. I will use them this fall/winter in mountain rescue training and looking forward to it!

    Best boots I have ever had.....

    • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

    Have owned three previous La Sportiva models of boots.Just taken delivery of the Trango Cube.

    Not done any mountain trips as yet but the first 'test walk' around the local roads have left me in no doubt that this is the most comfortable, supportive pair of boots I have ever owned.

    For a Mountain boot its incredibly light and comfortable. There is a fascinating balance of rigidity and flex for walking in..

    Highly recommended.



    Dave Lewis... Geologist with many years of reconnaissance mapping in mountains of Arctic Norway

    Great shoes

      Shoes have proved to be excellent this summer in the Caucasus. Rocks, ice, snow - very versatile and lightweight shoes. Heavy daily transitions and rapid ascent in the summer. Quick lacing system, the ability to adjust the height of the shoe tongue on the descent and ascent. When selecting the size expect that you will wear them with thick socks for trekking - one size larger than your normal foot size.

      Great shoes
      Unanswered Question

      The specs on this say strap on only but it looks like there is heel welt and that seems to be what some of the reviews say as well. Can these accommodate a hybrid crampon?

      Unanswered Question

      I have flat feet and overpronate. Ill be hiking the Scottish Highlands this summer. Any suggestions/ info on how these boots accommodate overpronators/ flat footed folk?

      I'm climbing Mt. Whitney East Face in less than two weeks looks like temps in the 20's-30's throughout the day. Will these be warm enough with a thick sock? I'm hoping to just bring these and not my TC Pro's. I assume these will get the job done? I am a solid 5.11 climber. Thanks!

      It really depends on how fast you move whether they will be warm enough. On a glacier, or more vertical terrain with crampons they would work for me in those temps as long as I could stay moving. I also get pretty cold feet so to be safe I would bring some foot warmers if I needed them. I imagine that while you are climbing you will be warm but, cold on the belays, insulated pants might help there. Comes down to personal preference at the end of the day. If you can I recommend trying to get out and use them in those temps to see how long you can stand still prior to your feet getting cold. Sitting at camp will give you an idea of how your feet will react.

      Are these more or less warm and stiff than the Trango S Evo Gtx? This will be my first mountaineering boot. Planning trips to SoCal mountains in winter and Sierras (Whitney mountaineer's route) in April.

      Hiking Rainier with RMI next year. Scheduled for mid July. Are these (Trango Cube GTX) enough for Rainier?

      I doubt they'll allow you to climb in the Trango Cubes. I climbed Rainier with a guide service last year (Alpine Ascents), and the only single boot they consider allowing clients to wear are the La Sportiva Nepal Evo GTX boots. The Nepal Evos are insulated, while the Trango Cubes are not.



      Everyone in my group ended up renting double plastic boots, which guarantee to keep your feet warm & dry. However, in mid-July, you may be able to get by with an insulated single boot. If you're considering buying boots rather than renting, I'd be sure to check with the guide service first.

      Can someone please go through the differences between these and the Evo GTX boots? Thanks. Are these stiffer than the EVO boots?

      Shopping Grivel crampons for these boots... Not familiar with the different mounting mechanisms (Cramp-O-Matic, New-Classic, and New-Matic). Which mount style(s) for Grivel work with these?

      Best Answer

      The New-Matic would be the way to go. There is not a welt in the front, only in the back so you need the big plastic piece to cover the toe, then the metal wire will snap onto the welt in the back.



      You can call or email me directly. 801-736-6398, or bporreca@backcountry.com

      Would this be a pretty good boot for general mountaineering in the Wasatch? Pretty much all of my winter hiking is in my ski boots so these would be used mostly in spring and fall. I am also planning a trip up Mt. Hood in the end of April and a trip up Gannett Peak in July. They will get a decent amount of crampon use but not really a lot of front pointing and no real ice climbing.

      Thanks



      PS: I use Grivel G12 crampons with hybrid bindings if that matters.

      I've just purchased a pair of these boots as I didn't like the fit or style of any of the female specific boots on offer here in the UK. I wore them for a mountain walk immediately after purchase in Snowdonia, North Wales, just as our winter conditions are ending. I didn't use crampons, so can't comment on that, but the terrain I covered was marsh, grassy slopes, rock and track. They were superb boots - incredibly light, comfortable and supporting - I've never tripped down a slippery, steep, grassy slope so quickly! They were perfect for scrambling over rock, too, so I'm thinking they truly will be a four season boot. Highly recommend them :)

      Absolutely. As long as temperatures don't get too cold you'll be comfortable. I wore mine for a November overnight trek in the North Cascades where temperatures got down below 20� F, and when I was moving I was totally fine. I would recommend down booties or some other footwear for in camp, but in my experience these are great for anything where you're moving or if the temperature is at or above freezing. For reference, all I wore for socks was SmartWool PhD Mountaineering socks.

      I will add that fit is important. If the boots are too tight your feet will feel colder. And hybrid crampons work on pretty much any boot with a heel welt, you only really get problems with weird fitting toe welts on some boot/crampon combos.

      How do these do on long approaches? For example, the 16ish mile hike into Titcomb Basin, WY?

      I did 10 miles in mine without breaking them in at all and had zero foot issues, not even a hot spot! Find the right sock and they'll do great (I use Smartwool PhD Mountaineering socks).

      If you're not used to trekking with a shanked boot it takes a bit of adjusting to, but after that it feels perfectly natural, and really secure.

      Are these stiff enough, when coupled with C2 crampons (something like the Petzl Vasak) for ice climbing?

      Hey tha105408899,



      You could ice climb in these boots, but I wouldn't necessarily recommend it. They don't have a full shank (so aren't as stiff as the Nebal Cubes for instance), and they also don't have a dedicated toe-welt for automatic crampons.



      While you will be able to attach crampons and climb ice, these won't make great dedicated ice climbing boots.



      Hit me up with any other questions!



      Ben



      1-800-409-4502 Ext. 4767