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Description

Pull on the La Sportiva Spantik Mountaineering Boots and climb higher and harder.

The La Sportiva Men's Spantik Mountaineering Boots give you the warmth for high-altitude and winter mountaineering and the agility to send difficult ice and mixed pitches. The synthetic outer boots increase flexibility and help reduce weight to a low 5lb 1oz per pair. Heat-moldable, removable liners give the Spantik Mountaineering Boots a precise fit to ease foot fatigue and minimize heel lift when you front point steep ice. La Sportiva knows what it feels like to lace boots while you wear gloves, so the invented the Fast Lace System, which lets you cinch down these boots with a single pull—even with gloves.

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La Sportiva Spantik Mountaineering Boot - Men's

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Here's what others have to say...

I am a woman climber and wear standard US...

Posted on

I am a woman climber and wear standard US women's size 8 is my running shoe. What size will be best in spantik?

Responded on

I am in same situation. Spantik smallest size (per mfg web site) is equivalent of a women's US 9, so we are out of luck. Leaves you with heavier Koflach or Scarpa models.
PLEASE La Sportiva and other mfgs, make smaller sizes for us women!

Responded on

I wear a size 8.5 women's running shoe and found that the size 40.5 Spantik fits me well. Try a size 40 - might work for you!

Responded on

I am a size 38 so I bought a size 39.5 Spantik (both pictured)and could not wear the boot even without socks because my toes were crammed in. Total shock to me. An 8.5 women's shoe is too big for me, so I think I should be able to get the 40.5, like joindc mentioned, and have room for socks.

I am a size 38 so I bought a size 39.5 Spantik (both pictured)and could not wear the boot even without socks because my toes were crammed in. Total shock to me. An 8.5 women's shoe is too big for me, so I think I should be able to get the 40.5, like joindc mentioned, and have room for socks.
5 5

great boot

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: True to size

Got for denali and used for training hikes and ice climbing this winter. I had a pair of scarpa phantom guides i wore up rainier and they ripped holes in my heels so i was scared about how much worse a double boot was going to feel. Never have i been so wrong. These boots are so comfortable. Can do 20 miles in a day in these and have no hot spots.

I am a girl looking for a double boot for...

Posted on

I am a girl looking for a double boot for mountaineering 6,000 to 8,000 meters. Looks like the Spantik is the best option but I would need size 38 and I can't find it anywhere! Does anyone know of a women's specific double boot similar to the spantik?

Best Answer Responded on

I'm in exact same situation, grrrr. La Sportiva makes this boot only to size 39: http://www.sportiva.com/products/footwear/mountain/spantik
Only brand that seems comparable is Millet and they don't seem to sell much mtneering goods in U.S.

We're stuck with heavier, less flexible double plastics from Koflach and Scarpa.

5 5

Very comfortable

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
  • Fit: True to size

These boots look to be huge on the pictures, but when you put them on with your snow pants, they are not that big at all. They are very comfortable for my feet. I wear size 45 tennis shoes, and I got size 45 for these boots and they fit great. I have not had a chance to take them hiking yet, but I wore them the whole day ice fishing with some quite long walks on the lake in deep snow and they worked great. My feet stayed dry and warm the whole time. Also, These boots are not as heavy as they look like. BTW, all other people on the lake were impressed with my boots and were asking about them :) I am planning to take these boots to the top of Mt Rainier in June. I am not afraid it's overkill. My feet stayed warm when it was about 20F and wind in the morning, and I didn't feel they are too warm when it got to 50F during the day.

What would be a perfect boot for 6,000...

Posted on

What would be a perfect boot for 6,000 feet and under?

Responded on

Unfortunately, there is no one "perfect" boot. The best boot for you really depends on a number of factors, such as foot size and shape, use, and budget. I highly recommend chatting with a gear guru. They are super helpful, and will help point you in the right direction.

Responded on

first of all, 6000 feet or 6000 m? This is a 6000 m boot which is many times greater than 6000 feet. You can use a regular hiking boot at 6000 feet. You might not even find snow depending on location and time of year.

This is an excellent 6000 meter boot, but it's all about fit and function.
Do you have cold feet? Hot feet? Do you have a wide or narrow foot? Scarpa may be better for narrow feet whereas this boot is built on a last for normal feet.

5 5

warm boot for cold feet

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: True to size

This boot has been the only boot to keep my chronically cold feet warm without difficulty. I froze my feet with another boot on Kilimanjaro which prompted this purchase. The price tag was hard to swallow, but it has been worth it. Since the purchase, I have climbed several winter 14ers in CO and Rainer with absolutely no warmth problem. They have required no break in time and I have not had any blisters. I did Rainer with a guide who has climbed Everest several times and he commented that the Spantik is his favorite and go-to boot for every mountain he climbs except the high camps of Everest. That's pretty high praise. 100% satisfied.

4 5

getting my feet wet

most of my "mountaineering" experience been with a splitboard on my back. However I might be going on a trip late this spring that would be purely mountaineering, I needed a cold weather boot that climbs well. My friend recommend these, and I took them on their maiden voyage up everyone's favorite backyard peak Mt. Olympus. I climbed/scrambled about 1500 vert of ice and rock with steel crampons and I have to say the boots climb great. Way overkill for the route and temps but it was nice to know that right out of the box I could spend a long day on the mountain with no pressure spots or blisters. Looking forward to getting them on some real terrain and testing them out more.

5 5

Spantik Sizing

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: True to size

Just as an update for folks looking for sizing help. I use 44.5 in all of LS running shoes and 10.5 (44.5) in Asics runners. in Asics the 11 (45) are too big. I use a 44 in the Nepal Evo.

I started with the 43, then 43.5 and 44. I ended up going all the way up to a Spantik 45 and having them cooked and fitted by a boot fitter in Redmond's bike and ski shop (forget the name ). I used them on 3 routes on Rainier in a weeks time. They started off great but by the end of the week they were loose and sloppy so I sold the 45 and went back down to the 44.5 in the Spantik and stayed in the 45 in the Oly Mons.

Responded on

Thanks for the tips. I'm the exact same foot and shoe size.

5 5

Great!!

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
  • Fit: Runs large

I have used this boot extensively over two seasons now and it performs well. On occasion I have also used it to snowboard into areas for access to climbing spots and was pleasantly surprised how well it worked. They don't come cheap, but are worth every penny!!

5 5

Try these on...

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
  • Fit: True to size

...if you want to throw away your other boots.
I froze my feet on my last trip to Alaska. I was wearing plastics with molded liners. These are warmer, more comfortable, and climb better than any other double boot period.

Try these on...

Weight in grams (per pair)?
When is...

Posted on

Weight in grams (per pair)?
When is Backcountry going to start including metric Specs?

Responded on

Sorry for the inconvenience, we do try to provide all the information available but we can only provide the information that the manufactures feel important enough to provide to us.

In the case of these boots a pair is 5lbs 1oz.

I hope this helps.

Best Answer Responded on

Backcountry lists the specs that come from the manufacturer. 5lb, 1 oz is 2296g. The math isn't hard.

Responded on

I know the math isn�t hard, but it�s not pleasant to be doing it for EVERY product I search in Backcountry.com
These boots are Italian. They use metric

5 5

Simply, amazing!!

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions
  • Fit: Runs small

These boots are just, without a doubt, the best! The inner boot is super comfortable and warm and gives a nice snug feeling. They are heat moldable, but I have not done that yet as they fit just fine without it.

The lacing system was a bit confusing at first, but once you get the hang of it its the best. Very easy to lace up with gloves on during a cold morning.

Crampon compatibility is also great. I went with the Grivel G12s and they fit perfectly. The boot is a bit large (I wear a size 45) so it does just barely fit the crampon without an extender bar. If I were to get overboots I would defiantly need to go with the extender bar for the G12s.

In terms of sizing, I did a lot of debating over it and decided to size up a full size. I wear a size 10.5 regular hiking shoe. I started with a half size but it was just a tad too snug with my sock layers.

Overall, I highly recommend this boot. I got it for both winter adventures in the Whites as well as for Rainier with the hope that I will use it on future, colder ascents.

Simply, amazing!!
Bottom View of Boots

Bottom View of Boots

Posted on

A view from the bottom of size 45 Spantiks.

I am a female climber ... I have the la...

Posted on

I am a female climber ... I have the la Sportiva Trango In a size 40 (standard US women's size 8 is my running shoe size). Should I start at a 41 in the spantik?

Responded on

I read a comment somewhere that the sizing is consistent in all the boots. So 40 should be good I think, unless you're going to wear significantly thicker socks in Spantik.

I have a size 44.5 spantik
Which gaiter...

Posted on

I have a size 44.5 spantik
Which gaiter will fit them?
And in which size?
Thanks

Best Answer Responded on

I also wear a 44.5 boot, and the Outdoor Research Expedition Crocs in a size large is what I use and would recommend, especially with mountaineering boots. Good fit and holds up pretty well against crampons.

4 5

Great Boot For The Cold and Technical!

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times
  • Fit: True to size

Picked these up for a trip to the Cordillera Blanca and have used them in Northern Alaska and Northern Canada. These are a fantastically warm boot that still give you enough feel to climb technical routes in the alpine. The inner and outer boot feel very natural and work together well. They both offer insulation. Have experienced temps down to -10F with no issues whatsoever. They can keep your toes warm lower than that for sure. They have a high arch and wide toe box. The wide toe box is key for keeping your feet warm but it's not too wide so as to lose technical climbing ability...Of course, it's no nepal extreme or trango. I wear a 47 in most la sportiva boots and no change here. They work great with most crampons. I'm currently using Grivel G 22's and have used BD sabertooth crampons in the past. Some durability issues with these boots: laces break so bring extras, back of the calf cuff material rips so be careful when pulling your boots on and the liner breaks down so be prepared to buy a new one.

anyone have some pointers on sizing these?...

Posted on

anyone have some pointers on sizing these? I got the 44 ( I wear a street show in 10 sometimes I get 10.5 ) and they fit pretty good with a mid-weight sock but when walking or with a lite kick into the ground I can feel my toes bumping, I have maybe a 1/4 of inch slip in the heel so I feel like if I go up another size even with heavy socks it will be to much, hell if I go up another size I don't think my crampons will fit, just a little paranoid for my toes, I have always worn single leathers and once tried Kolfachs and when climb was over I had 4 toes swollen black and oozing blood, but I think a lot of that came from climbing the ice chute on the Kautz route. Where you at Phil, lol

Best Answer Responded on

Hey,

What's a little blood and nerve damage? lol! Okay, so the best way to go on the toe bump is the #1 solution, bar none...go ahead and size up 1/2. You've just got to get rid of that, period. If you need to go with a longer center bar on your crampons, so be it. BC has always been pretty liberal in my experience with overlapping size swap outs. Of course they have your credit card info, but they've never processed a second transaction while I still had one in the que that I was planning on returning. Call them to verify and for the details.

Now, on to the heel lift. You said that they "fit pretty good". Does that mean that they fit "pretty good" in overall volume...heel width, instep, toe box width? You're right at the cusp of what's acceptable with 1/4", but if you go up a 1/2 size to get rid of the toe bang, that's likely to increase, so it will have to be addressed. Heavier sock and practicing your lacing technique for the specific boot first. Second would be to introduce a foot bed that holds your foot into the heel cup better. Third I would say is to start packing out the tongue with a little padding. I know La Sportiva makes one for the Baruntse, but you might want to call and ask them if it's also useable with the Spantik. If not, you can either rig up something yourself and play with it till it feels good, or maybe better yet, find a good ski shop with a competent boot fitter. "Competent" being the operative word. This boot can also be custom heat molded, and again, you can do it yourself, but that's sort of sketchy, so if you find that "competent" boot tech with an oven, have them do it for you. For what it's worth, I've never had any kind of double boot that didn't require me having to f*** with it to get what I needed it to do.

This is probably the process I dread most. When I find a boot that works for anything, I've been through 10 models in 30 sizes, and it's still a long and arduous process. Hope this helped you out.

thanks Phil,sorry for the mis-info,i have...

Posted on

thanks Phil,sorry for the mis-info,i have bd sabretooth clip, yeah im kind cringing at the price,haha,i was also looking at the scarpa inverno.

Best Answer Responded on

Go with the Spantiks. I'm the same way...I choke for a while, but then when I get something and it does what I want it to do, I remember all the old adages about getting what I paid for and move forward. If it doesn't work out, back it goes in short order. Think of it this way: since you already have a more suitable set of crampons for these boots, you're $200 ahead on building a better system right there.

View all contributions... Be patient, it might take a while.