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Diarrhea will help you drop weight, but you have to carry more toilet paper. Or more hand soap.

Destroy harmful waterborne bacteria in your water with the Hydro-Photon SteriPEN Adventurer Opti. The SteriPEN uses UV light to kill giardia, cryptosporidium, bacteria, and viruses in just a few seconds, so you can stay hydrated on the trail without having to worry about getting sick. And at a scant 3.6 ounces and 6 inches long, the Adventurer Opti won't weigh you down or use up a ton of valuable pack space.

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Hydro Photon SteriPEN Adventurer Opti

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Here's what others have to say...

5 5

never fails

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

i have used the steripens in asia for months at a time. this year i am working with disaster relief in nepal. the villages are a mess...as are the water sources. there is more garbage and s-h-i-t around than there ever before and i am eating, sleeping, and drinking water in the thick of it daily. once again...6 weeks in and not a hitch or a hiccup with water issues. i didnt notice the new pen is not a double aa so i didnt bring back up batteries. so, take note of this.

5 5

Can't get much easier than this!

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Once you know the specifics of using the Adventurer, it can't get much easier. I've taken it on many trips as a precautionary measure, as well as my main filtering source on backpacking trips.

It's never let me down, and I've never gotten sick.

Can't get much easier than this!
5 5

Big improvement over the original

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've had this little guy for about a year now. I had the original model SteriPen that I used for a few years and this one is lighter, sleeker, more rugged feeling, and seems to have better battery life.

There are certain times where a filter is still a necessity or just more practical. Murky water and big groups, to name a few - even SteriPen freely admits this. But, there's a ton of situations where this thing is perfect. I love, love, love this thing for long trail runs in the mountains. Small enough to fit in a running vest or even most lumbar packs. No more choking down chemical treated water. Also great for general day hikes and short solo/duo backpack trips. For longer trips, especially if there's more than one person, I still think a filter is more practical. You may be disappointed in the SteriPen if you buy it as a replacement for a filter - but if you look at it as a different sort of water treatment device altogether, it's brilliant.

What is the best way to deal with the problem of untreated water on the threads of a bottle that has been sterilized by the pen? I have been using an msr miniworks for a long time now and am about to switch to something lighter. I'm down to either the steripen or the sawyer mini. Suggestions and anecdotes are welcome.:)

Responded on

Hi Phil - SteriPEN recommends wiping the water around the threads of the bottle. If you dry the area we find you can safely consume from the bottle you treat the water in. Please feel free to contact support@steripen.com if you have further questions about SteriPEN use and UV water purification.

Hi Phil - SteriPEN recommends wiping the water around the threads of the bottle.  If you dry the area we find you can safely consume from the bottle you treat the water in. Please feel free to contact support@steripen.com if you have further questions about SteriPEN use and UV water purification.

Is the steripen good for purifying tap water as well? I'm planning on doing some international travel and I'm considering getting a steripen to sterilize tap water to put in my camelbak. Any thoughts?

Best Answer Responded on

I just got back from Thailand where I used mine to purify the tap water. It worked like a charm.

5 5

Great Backpacking Tool

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used SteriPENs for a long time, but recently upgraded to this model. Simply put, I recommend going with this model over the cheaper alternatives for several reasons: size, battery life, battery type, and weight. It's smaller than many models, which makes a big difference when packing for a trip. I keep mine in a shoulder pocket on my pack so that I can easily use it without unpacking my bag. Next is battery life and type. It's more efficient than cheaper models and you don't have to use clunky AA batteries. This takes two small CR123 batteries, which are both lighter, and seem to last longer. I previously had the SteriPEN Photon Traveler and it requires 4 AA batteries -- it's heavy as hell! Bottom line, if you want a SteriPEN that's small, durable, and efficient, choose the Adventurer. Also, it works well with hydration bladders and water bottles. I've noticed it's a little awkward using this in a bladder because the light becomes hard to see (so you don't know if it's on or not). It's easy to find out, but it's still a little awkward.

5 5

Excellent product

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

If you're in an area with readily available water sources, like the John Muir Trail, the SteriPEN series of products are the best choice for purifying water. Lightweight thru hikers swear by tablets, but you have to wait 20-30 minutes for those to do the job, and the water generally tastes bad because of the chemicals. The pen is a bit heavier, but well worth the slight penalty. I managed 7 days of use for 2 people on one set of batteries. Will not work as well in cloudy or muddy water, but you'd want to use a pump in those situations anyway.

5 5

best water-treatment system!

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I've used several different treatment/filtering systems ranging from UV, to filters to chemicals, and his is my go-to method for sure! I Love this thing when it comes to a clean mountain creek, or babbling brook. The down side of this light is that if the water tastes bad, this won't change anything, and it requires the use of CR123 batteries which can be hard to find and slightly expensive but all in all it is worth it! I would highly recommend this to friends and would replace it instantly if it was lost, stolen or damaged beyond repair! LOVE IT!

4 5

Yeah, It might look clean enough.

I got a new perspective being in a large group of people hiking and climbing on Rainier. I am like a camel and I seem to keep my fluids inside me. Or I sweat them out. I was amazed how much people pee everywhere. Yeah, that stream at Pebble Creek coming out from the Muir snow field looks like it would be fine to drink from without treating. Not a chance in hell Batman. I saw more people peeing all over the place just a stones throw away from the stream. I am also pretty sure I saw a marmot intentionally peeing and defecating upstream from a Chinese family taking sips directly from it as they took a break from their marmot molestation photo shoots. Payback is a bitch.

Yeah, You need to treat your water.

This steri pen is so quick and easy to use. Are there still some parts per million pee in your water? Sure. But what are you gonna do? I saw pee stains all the way up Rainier and the very top is like a volcanic pee trough.

Folks, you are drinking someones or somethings pee one way or the other.

I prefer this one to the classic. Not as big and clumsy feeling.

5 5

SteriPEN Opti vs Classic

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Battery Life:
I have used the Adventurer Opti all summer long and just had the battery run out on my last trip. I typically use the Adventurer Opti 1 to 2 days a week filtering about 2 liters per day. I would say if you're an avid outdoor junkie who gets out every week than you would only need to replace the battery in the Opti every 2 months. I've used the SteriPEN Classic for about 5 years and the battery life is roughly twice as long when using high quality lithium AA's. SteriPEN has a comparison chart with number of treatments per charge (.5L) but I always do 1L increments due to using a 1L Nalgene. Even in .5L increments the chart does show the Classic having twice the treatment cycles per charge, confirming my real world experience. It shouldn't be a surprise that the Classic has twice as many cycles per charge because the Classic uses 4 AA batteries while the Opti uses only 2 small CR123 batteries.

Durability and Use:
I've used the Classic for 5 years and haven't had a single issue and have only used the Opti for 3 months now. The biggest difference comes in at length and weight. Opti is about 6 1/4 inches long with 4.5oz trail weight (batteries and case). Spare batteries only weigh 1.1 oz because the Opti uses CR123's. The classic comes in at 7 3/4 inches long and 6.6 oz trail weight. Spare batteries weigh 2 oz due to the 4AA's. While the Opti is a little less convienient to use in the field, the weight savings and much smaller design has made me keep coming back to the Opti.

***The extra 20$ for the SteriPEN Adventurer Opti is worth the cost as it retains most of the great features of the classic but in a lighter, more compact design. ***

Complete comparison of the Opti and classic at:
http://sunrisegear.blogspot.com/2014/09/steripen-adventurer-opti-vs-classic.html

SteriPEN Opti vs Classic

Does the pen sterilize the cap/ the threads...

Does the pen sterilize the cap/ the threads of a bottle? Do I need to even worry about that? I am use to bleeding the threads using tablets and and worried that I could get nasty bugs if the threads aren't disinfected.

Best Answer Responded on

No it would really only sterilize everything in the actual bottle but, not on threads of the bottle. To be truly safe you would have to find a way to get the "dirty" water in the bottle without spilling into the threads.

Responded on

Good question. Don't get the cap wet, and or rinse off the cap with a bit of sterile water. I suggest using a gatorade bottle, they weigh little, and have a superb cap and large mouth.

5 5

I Love this thing

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Used this all summer long and never got had an issue with sickness. Much better than pumping. 90 seconds gets you a liter of water. I carry an extra set of extra batteries as a backup but made it through one season without burning up batteries. Its not cheap but the weight and time savings are well worth it In my opinion

4 5

Game changer; poor battery design

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

This thing is a game changer for all my climbing/backpacking expeditions. Lightweight, fast, allows me to carry very little water weight when in areas with water (which are plentiful in the tetons). Only clear flaw is that the batteries are expensive, rare, and you have to take them out of the device after each use to maximize their lifetime as the life is unpredictable. carry an extra set or other purifier for backup. I've needed it.

Responded on

What kind of batteries are you referring to? Thanks!

Responded on

3V Lithium 123. I actually found an affordable package of them on Amazon.

Responded on

They are not rare, or expensive. They are common, and cheap if you buy 10 at a time. Edit your post.

What volume of water can this steri pen...

What volume of water can this steri pen purify at a time? I'm wondering if I can use it to purify my 3 litter camel back bladder...

Best Answer Responded on

It actually mentions this in the Tech Specs on the left side of the page. It'll purify any volume, just takes longer for larger volumes. At 8 minutes per gallon, a 3L Camelbak bladder should take about 6 minutes to purify.

Responded on

It can in theory...but they don't really recommend it for any type of soft-sided reservoirs or for more than one liter at a time. It's a matter of submersion depth and efficiency. It's only tested and certified for volumes up to 1L.

http://www.steripen.com/media/wysiwyg/adventurer-opti/user-guides/adventurer-opti-user-guide-en.pdf

Responded on

Angus and Phil are both right. You'd basically have to do one liter at a time, presumably with an empty nalgene bottle, dump it in, and repeat. It should take approximately 6 minutes to do it.

Responded on

Phil, and Alexander are wrong.

You can do any size, any volume, if you can swish it around, which you can in one of those silly camelbak bags. Over do it to make sure, batteries are cheap.

Pack batteries!

Pack batteries!

Inspecting my steripen to figure out why it won't work. Solution: batteries.

Responded on

That same thing happened to me...good thing I brought chemicals as a backup

4 5

Great Device but Bring a Back up

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

I bought this about 2 years ago and really like it. It does have it's limitations being battery powered though, which is significant because you're talking about your water supply. After a number of uses, the device didn't seem to be able to complete a purification cycle. It would start it, then would give the flashing red signal which means a vague "something is wrong". Later I realized that it just meant that I needed to change the batteries and everything was fine. Great product though. Easy to learn, super light, and so far I haven't gotten sick. So I'm pretty happy.

4 5

Don't get caught without batteries

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

I love this thing now that I know what I am doing with it. It is, however, one of htose things one must read the manual for, then reread to make sure he/she knows how to use the tool on the trail. I did not. I read the manual, tested it, put it in my kit and forgot about it until my next hike. I could not figure out how to work it as recall was abysmal, and the cuing is not so intuitive. Once I relearned to use it, it was a great device. 1 minute for 1 L, 30 seconds for .5 L. Add a nalgene or similarly wide mouthed bottle (A MUST) and you're all set.
The batteries last for many exposures but when the die, they're dead. Again, I didn't learn this until I was on the trail. Probably should have tested it, no? Oops.
Takes 6v batteries, which are rare (dog trainer collars and some cameras?). This is inconvenient. AA or AAA would make this a five star device. That, and instructions printed on the device for dummies like me.

Responded on

I've had the same problem with the batteries. Totally forgot to put spare batteries and didn't realize they were dead because it'll first keep "trying" to do a purication cycle but won't finish. I thought something was wrong with the device. As soon as I got back, I replaced the batteries and worked like a charm again. I agree about the instructions and AA/ AAA would be awesome because then you could use a solar pack with the system.

4 5

Small and convenient water treatment

Solid water treatment device. Small and light, great for multi-day hiking trips.

5 5

Steripen Rocks!

  • Familiarity: I've used it several times

Makes purifying water that much easier. Lightweight, can double as an emergency backup light (total last minute option), and has not let me down yet, and I've used it in many different places. Only reason I'm giving it four stars is because you have to hold it submerged and stir, and if it barely comes out of the water, you gotta restart. Depending on what the water is in might make it difficult. This was taken in GSMNP:

Steripen Rocks!