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  • Hutchinson - Sector 28 Tire - Tubeless - Black, 127 tpi

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  • Hutchinson - Sector 28 Tire - Tubeless - Black, 127 tpi

Hutchinson Sector 28 Tire - Tubeless

sale $79.99 $109.0027% Off

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    • Black, 127 tpi, 700x28c
      sale $79.99
    3.553

    3 Reviews

    Details

    Ride over anything.

    While your weekend may not consist of riding the storied cobblestones of France for a chance to win the Queen of the Classics, you can still take on the bumpiest chipseal roads you encounter with the confidence of a pro racing Roubaix with Hutchinson's Sector 28 Tubeless tire.

    The French manufacturer developed the Sector 28 in honor of a cobblestone-filled race on its home turf, but the tire can handle more than just centuries-old stones. Using dual-compound rubber and 127tpi casing, Hutchinson created a tire that resists flatting and is dependable on rough roads, gravel, and dirt, maintains a supple ride and easy handling. The center tread is slightly firmer to encourage low rolling resistance, with softer rubber on the sides and subtle grooves in the sidewall to provide grip while cornering.

    Relax while riding on summer's torn-up construction zone roads without having to worry about squinting for stray nails or staples — Hutchinson includes a thin barrier to reinforce the center tread that manages to avoid making the Sector 28s feel clunky.

    • Item #HUT000A

    Tech Specs

    Compound
    dual compound rubber
    Size
    700 c x 28 mm
    Type
    tubeless
    TPI
    127
    PSI
    [recommended] 87
    Bead
    Ride Lock
    Claimed Weight
    295 g
    Recommended Use
    cycling
    Manufacturer Warranty
    limited

    Tech Specs

    • Reviews
    • Q & A

    What do you think about this product?

    Have questions about this product?

    Really, really good

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I'm writing this review to hopefully encourage other to take the tubeless leap. These ties are very good - supple, wide, grippy, durable. I'm able to ride at lower pressures and (mostly) without fear of flats.

    I have 3500 miles on a set of these so far this year. Until yesterday, I've had zero flats. First flat was yesterday, it was a sidewall hole that happened on a sharp rock on Unpaved road. I've ridden these on smooth roads and really nasty Unpaved and gravel with great success. I'm not going to let one rock (out of many, many rocks) sway me tho - i am a total tubeless convert based on this experience!

    Mounting was easy. I will definitely purchase again, but - I'm hopeful that more tubeless options come to market and that this technology catches on with more riders.

    best

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    I have been running this tire since it came out a few years ago. I live in boulder county, CO and ride pavement and dirt in the pains and mountains. on an open pro rim, this tire does just barely fit in a specialized tarmac.
    pros : good ride
    easy enough tubeless setup
    long wearing
    cons: prone to failure- of the 7 or 8 of these tires I've had, I've had to toss 2 or 3 of them w small cuts that just wouldn't stay sealed at adequate riding pressures (say > 75psi). given the cost, a bit frustrating. the scwalbe one rides just as well, or better, and is far more durable, but is much heavier.

    I continue to run these, but eagerly await another road tubeless tire that is plump, light and a bit tougher

    When you find that tire, let the world know. I've been searching for it over the past two years with not much luck. One nice development: Specialized now sell a refillable air cannister that can supposedly fill and seat a tubeless tire in one shot obviating the need for a compressor. I look for any signs that major players are still pursuing road tubeless. When you get it working, it's brilliant.

    Comfortable grippy ride; fussy install

    • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

    Good:
    A. Handle well and smooth the ride over uneven and loose surfaces.

    B. Grippy and stable in the corners on fast descents or whenever brakes are applied. Confidence building.

    C. Good overall ride quality (once they are mounted).

    D. Reasonably fast given their size (rolling resistance) and at lower pressures. (I ride mostly 90-95psi to protect rims from rock damage).

    Not Good:
    1. Difficult to get the bead to seat and for the seal to hold. Air compressor is essential as is REQUIRED Hutchinson tire sealant. Contrary to other reviews I've read, I was able to mount and unmount the tires using just my fingers. Brushing some soapy water along the inside of tire rim before mounting does help seat the bead. It can take more than one try. You shouldn't ride them for 24hrs after mounting.

    2. Quality is uneven. My first pair wouldn't seat and hold air (see picture of a simple water test and sealant leaking around the rim). My second pair is developing troubling tears along the sidewall where threads from the fabric are pulling loose.

    3. Durable but vulnerable to puncture and damage anywhere off the center of the tread (two tires damaged on the road).

    4. At times, they can feel like your wheels are stuck in chewing gum when climbing.

    I went through 2 pairs of these tires over the summer. The first pair wouldn't mount and seal on the rims properly no matter what I tried to do. The bead would never seat and the sealant would never fully seal the ongoing moderate leak. The picture shows the sealant bubbling out around the rim several days after mounting (and a few short rides) when tested by a quick soak in the sink. Tires were losing pressure 10-20psi per day or per ride.

    I wanted wide low pressure tubeless 28mm tires tough enough for bad surfaces and training miles, but light and low friction too. There aren't many tubeless options. These sort of work but they've not taken me very far for time and money invested. I can't see buying them again.

    It is possible that my first pair are defective. It is also possible that I was unlucky hitting just the wrong sort of road debris. But even the tires that worked seem not to be holding up.

    Three stars because they seem like a good tire when they work and your mileage might be better.

    [Wheels used: Shimano WH-6800 Tubeless wheelset.]

    Comfortable grippy ride; fussy install

    Yup, James, your experience matches mine with the Sector 28s. I would add just a couple of points of my own:

    As expressly stated on the Hutch. website and as you noted, sealant is REQUIRED for these tires to be run tubeless. That's part of why these wide tires are only 275g. There is no internal butyl liner, and they thus require a healthy coating of latex sealant that may take two applications before they seal up. Once they do, however, they hold air for days. Also once they seal up, you can move them from one wheelset to another without having to seal them up again. Yes, if you spray soapy water on the inflated tire at initial inflation you will see the leaky sidewalls as in James B.'s photo; keep the faith and seal them up again tomorrow! This is the same way Teravail Lickskillet tires (also 275g) behave. I do not believe this leakiness is a defect, rather I think it is a price to be paid for the lightweight casing.

    There is a sort of scrim fabric vulcanized into the tire around the bead and I have seen it fray threads right at the brake track/tire interface. Also I have seen cracking in the rubber at the same location of the tire, and observed sealant bleeding through. I let 'em seal up again, pluck off any stray threads and proceed to wear out the tire over the next 3000 miles.

    That's what I've done with three sets by now. I don't get flats and I am able to run 68psi under my 150# on smooth surfaced roads. They are ultra comfortable, fast and shred the curves at speed.

    Where they fall short is in loose gravel or soft sandy ground or slop where the smooth, relatively narrow width and lack of any cleats make them sketchy. Lower your psi!

    Finally, "stuck in chewing gum"? Maybe raise your psi.

    [Wheels used: Velocity Blunts, Hed Belgium+, Easton EA90 SL, Nox Composites A36D, Ignite V7SL, Ignite V7EL]

    In my picture, the white stuff you see is Hutchinson "Rep-Air" rapidly leaking through poor seal with rim. I have never seen tubeless tires leak at the rim so easily. I ran them at 90psi and read that to get them sealed the first time, 120psi for 24hrs. I never tried running them below 80psi -- due to perception of increasing power loss to rolling resistance. Maybe they seal and run better at 68psi, but that is well below manufacturers specification. I spent many hours fiddling with these and got this kind of result too easily. Both Schwalbe and Specialized make finger mountable road tubeless tires that can be seated to the rim with just a track pump and some brio. Their tires have no trouble holding air right after initial installation. If these could do that, they would be a much better offering.