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Highgear Aerial Altimeter Watch

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5 5

Great Watch

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer
  • Fit: True to size

This is my second review of this watch. I recently broke this one after 8 yrs of abuse. The band and pin broke. Another commenter had stated the plastic is soft, which is true. However I highly recommend this watch. I've had three different altimeter watches and this one has performed the best. Avoid the Highgear Alti-XTss Altimeter Watch - that watch sucks.

Do you have a replacement band for this...

Do you have a replacement band for this watch - HIG0026? I have tried to find it on Highgear's web site but cannot. Can you help since I purchased it from you?

Responded on

No, only the watches are sold here. Check, to see if High Gear ahs what you need though-

http://www.highgear.com/store/ProductsList.aspx?CategoryID=242&selection=0

5 5

Paid for itself on the first trip.

I got this thing when it was on sale and it has exceeded my expectations. Just like almost every altimeter it requires frequent calibration, but if you do that this watch is very accurate. I calibrated mine on the first day of three day trip and it was dead on with the U.S. Geological Survey marker when we reached the top of the mountain on the last day. I was Impressed. You do have to take the watch of your wrist if you want a proper temperature reading, but that is standard with these watches. The trip logs were a great feature too as it kept accurate total elevation gains and losses for each day. The only slightly annoying thing is that the buttons are easily pressed. They kept getting pushed every time I put my backback on. This never caused any real problems though. This is a great watch!

4 5

Useful

It does require frequent calibration, but if you don't understand why, look it up. There is a feature that "locks" the altitude, according to the manual, if the local barometric pressure remains still for 30 minutes, useful for overnight. i usually found it didn't usually require calibration the next morning, unless there was a severe local barometric change overnight. hiking over the summer, you could see the graphical representation of your trip's altitude vs. time. there is a function to time your rate of descent while skiing which is fun to use. the thermometer always reads about 28-30 degrees when on the wrist and is affected by sunlight as well.

Does this watch have a count back timer?

Does this watch have a count back timer?

Responded on

it doesn't have a count down timeri.e. stars at 1 minute and sets off an alarm in 60 seconds

4 5

Pretty Good for the Price

I used this watch around town in L.A. and had trouble getting the barometer to reflect the correct weather, but then took it to Nepal for an Everest Base Camp trek and once I pegged the altimeter to a known altitude, it seemed to give pretty accurate readings without re-pegging the altitude for about 12 days. Now back at home I've been using it for running, and it works great.

2 5

Don't take off the band

Cool watch, but one side of the band came off with only a little accidental pressure. The pins go into relatively soft plastic. They are so deep that when I tried to reattach the band to the case, I couldn't (even with the right watch tool). I tried for two hours, and then I threw it against the wall and screamed. Then, I epoxied the band to the case. Then, it fell off the first time I hit a jump. I lost the watch, but I landed the jump with style.

5 5

Great Watch

I've been using it for skiing and it has been great. I will probably use it in the summer as well when mtn biking to track altitude. However it does take a little while to get used to the controls but the manual does a great job explaining everything.

5 5

Pretty Good so far

I've had this watch for a couple of months now. I like the ease of use - it's not hard to figure out how to run it. I've been using the altimeter a lot and it is very accurate. It does need to be updated regularly but that is expected.

I haven't had a chance to use the ski chrono yet but I have been using the data logger when hiking and I like it. Nice to be able to see the real alt as well as the ascent.

I have hit the buttons a few times by accident but I haven't activated anything or changed anything because all the resets have to be done by holding a button for a couple of seconds.

The backlighting is cool too. Not just a backlight but more of an inversion of lighting - good stuff.

Can't beat the price with a stick either.

5 5

Alterra Watch for Skiing

I wrote this in response to Zubertime's question below. I repost this at Andrew's request:
I have the Alterra model, which also has the digital compass feature. I bought the watch last year to take up to Mammoth with me for the season. I am retired and wanted to keep track of the amount of vertical feet I could ski in a season. The watch is NOT intuitively designed, but I traveled with the 2" square instruction booklet in my ski jacket pocket, and was ultimately able to get comfortable with the darned thing. You can preprogram 3 fixed altitudes in the watch, so for my situation, I did not need to know the local altimeter settings. I preselected into the Alterra the fixed altitudes of Mammoth Main Lodge, Canyon Lodge, and Eagle Lodge, depending on where I was going to start out for the day. At my ski locker at Main Lodge, when I would pull out my helmet to begin the skiing day, I would see the little instruction booklet left inside the helmet, and this would be my reminder to myself to start the altimeter watch. Then I would put the booklet in my jacket pocket, and when finishing the day, and back at the locker, I would remove my helmet, replace the booklet back in the helmet for the overnight, and stop the altimeter readout. It was nice because I could then read how much vertical feet I had skiied on that "log" (15 total "log days" available), see how many "laps" or trips up the chair I had made (150' up and down = 1 lap), and see how many hours and minutes I had been skiing that day. The thing I did not like was that at the end of 15 recorded logs (Log 15), the 16th trip would just overwrite Log 15 as a new Log 15. So for me to know my total vertical for the season, I needed to record my total "Accumulated" vertical, and then zero out all the logs, and start over. When a guy can get upwards of a million vertical feet in a season, this routine of constantly resetting every 15 days and not ever losing your total is kind of an inconvenient drag, especially with today's technology. The numbers on the altimeter page are large and easy to read in the weather. For another kind of neat feature (discovered after some figuring!), it is possible to have your Current Altitude always being displayed so u can track yourself thruout the day, or have the running Accumulated Altitude displayed so u can see if u have met your vertical goal for the day while u are on the mountain, and not wait til u finish or have to push a bunch of buttons to see it. There is a watch page where the current time is also co-displayed with your Accumulated Altitude, so no gloves need to be removed and additional buttons pushed to see how much longer u have before lunch or the chair closes.

I reset my watch and need to know how I...

I reset my watch and need to know how I can get it back up a running properly

Responded on

Ive seen alot of people say you should shop at TD and SAC. Does anyone know what that company is.TD=tramdock.comSAC=steapandcheap.comthey are both hosted by backcountry.com awesome!

How many readings does the log book...

How many readings does the log book record?Thanks,

does this watch track total daily vertical...

does this watch track total daily vertical for skiing or hiking?

Responded on

Hi Zubertime: I have the Alterra model, which also has the digital compass feature. I bought the watch last year to take up to Mammoth with me for the season. I am retired and wanted to keep track of the amount of vertical feet I could ski in a season. The watch is NOT intuitively designed, but I traveled with the 2" square instruction booklet in my ski jacket pocket, and was ultimately able to get comfortable with the darned thing. You can preprogram 3 fixed altitudes in the watch, so for my situation, I did not need to know the local altimeter settings. I preselected into the Alterra the fixed altitudes of Mammoth Main Lodge, Canyon Lodge, and Eagle Lodge, depending on where I was going to start out for the day. At my ski locker at Main Lodge, when I would pull out my helmet to begin the skiing day, I would see the little instruction booklet left inside the helmet, and this would be my reminder to myself to start the altimeter watch. Then I would put the booklet in my jacket pocket, and when finishing the day, and back at the locker, I would remove my helmet, replace the booklet back in the helmet for the overnight, and stop the altimeter readout. It was nice because I could then read how much vertical feet I had skiied on that "log" (15 total "log days" available), see how many "laps" or trips up the chair I had made (150' up and down = 1 lap), and see how many hours and minutes I had been skiing that day. The thing I did not like was that at the end of 15 recorded logs (Log 15), the 16th trip would just overwrite Log 15 as a new Log 15. So for me to know my total vertical for the season, I needed to record my total "Accumulated" vertical after Log 15, and then zero out all the logs, and start over. When a guy can get upwards of a million vertical feet in a season, this routine of constantly resetting every 15 days and not ever losing your total is kind of an inconvenient drag, especially with today's technology. Other than that, the Alterra is a valuable tool, and I think u will like it. The numerals are big, so the watch face can be easily read under less than ideal weather conditions.

3 5

Make sure the pilots not lying?

To be too disappointed when your watch says 6000 feet when the pilot says you are 30,000 feet...its called pressurization....buy hey...great advertising!

Is this a men's or woman's watch?

Is this a men's or woman's watch?

Responded on

Unisex - they do make the Aerial in a cool sun yellow.

Write your question here... What is the...

Write your question here... What is the size i.e. diameter measurement?

Responded on

Model: Aerial Weight: 2 oz. Height: 0.5 in. Width: 1.2 in. length: 4.6 in. Hope this helps

Unanswered Question

Ok, this may be getting really picky, but...

Ok, this may be getting really picky, but on every other website with this watch the color is listed as 'charcoal' and this one is 'black'. Is this the same watch?thanks!

5 5

cheap gear geek?

Then this is the watch for you! You have to calibrate the altimeter often for an accurate reading, but given how the thing works that's kind of a given. It's pretty easy to figure out and use. Very happy with my purchase.

5 5

My favourite gear

- specs -
Thermometer: +14 to +122F. I used it at +5F, it still worked fine. To get an accurate temperature reading I usually fix it to my pack, or the front of my jacket.
Baro: 300 - 1100 mBar (8.86 - 32.48 inHg). I calibrate it once a month using info from weather.gov
Altimeter: -2300 to +30,045 feet (-700 to 9150 meters).
Water resistance 5ATM
Awesome.