Description

Bombproof protection at a heckuva price.

Most four-season tents can get you through a winter storm, but many of them come with vertebrae-crushing poundage, and almost all of them come with a budget-busting price tag ... except the Eureka! Alpenlite 2-Person, 4-Season Tent. This versatile expedition shelter has the features, technology, and bomber construction to stand toe-to-toe with the big guns, but its relatively low weight and even more impressive price point make it a no-brainer for budget-minded go-getters. Two roof vents, four wall vents, and a vestibule vent means that it's versatile enough to consider using year round.
  • Double-wall design with tapered A-frame layout and center reinforcement pole built for four-season expeditions into extreme environments
  • StormShield fly material features taped seams and a PU coating to repel rain and snow; ripstop reinforcement withstands brutal winds
  • Multiple ventilation ports in canopy body and fly help cut down on condensation
  • Six DAC Pressfit poles cross at multiple points for additional stability and strength against the elements
  • Large front vestibule stores your bigger pieces of gear and can be configured in multiple ways
  • Small rear vestibule is accessible from inside the tent via a small door
  • Clear PU panel in front vestibule gives you a window to the outside world
  • Interior amenities include a 20-pocket organizer wall, loops for a gear loft, and a flashlight loop
  • Footprint and gear loft sold separately

Share your thoughts

What do you think of the

Eureka Alpenlite 2XT Tent: 2-Person 4-Season

? Share a...

Write a review

No file chosen

Rather attach a photo from another website?

Rather attach a photo from your computer?

  • Product review:
  • Share a video
  • Share a photo

How familiar are you with the product?(Optional)

Only jpg, jpeg, png, gif or bmp files please.

Save

Here's what others have to say...

4 5

Very sturdy, a little heavy for size

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I was really excited to get this tent. I've seen them for a couple of years and wondered how good of a tent Eureka could make (since most of their gear is your general big chain store sort).

When the guy I bought the tent handed it over to me I was a little surprised to feel its weight push down on me as much as it does. It is touted as a lightweight tent by winter standards but is a bit on the heavy side at more than 8 lbs if you have all the guy line stakes.

When I set it up it was considerably smaller than my Trango 2 MH tent and even my Sierra Designs Nightwatch 2, which are also 4 season tents. The weight was between the two.

The entire bottom half zips down to screen with 6 panels. I was really excited by the possibility of mega ventilation since it was still September. To my dismay it was still very steamy that night even with a light breeze. Perplexed, I set up my Sierra Designs Nightwatch 2 tent and slept in it the next night (very similar weather conditions) and it was much cooler with only 1/2 the venting! Upon examination I think it has to do with the very small screened vent at the top of the Eureka's fly. It seems not adequate to let out the convected heat that gets trapped in the tent whereas the SD tent has a top vent that is 4 times the size and does not have a screen (the fly doesn't need a screen ).

When I guyed the tent out, I was blown away at how sturdy is was! I tried to shake it and push on it with considerable force. It moved less than an inch. It is the most sturdy 4 season tent I've erected. This is a big selling point to me in Minnesota because we camp on lakes (there's no governance on lakes in the winter so they are fee free). The wind gusts at 30mph sustained here. The tent also has a great wind profile.

I would guess in the winter, the added trapped warmth might also be welcomed.

Thing that drove me nuts is that there's a small vestibule in the back of the tent but no way to access it from inside the tent!

Overall: good

Very sturdy, a little heavy for size

Do all of the mesh panels have zip up solid...

Do all of the mesh panels have zip up solid covers for them?

Responded on

yes. They are all very easy to work and don't get too tight when the tent is guyed out like other models.

yes. They are all very easy to work and don't get too tight when the tent is guyed out like other models.  <br/>
2 5

Design issues

  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Have been using the tent on our rtw trip in large variety of conditions, not yet in the snow. First time I used the tent, it rained heavily and the tent leaked from the Velcro straps that are sewn into the fly to attach to the poles. I would have expected to need to seal seams eventually, but not on first use. Additionally the fly doesn't cover all of the tent inner, especially the front corners which poke out and are exposed to the fly runoff, eventually leaking through. Also on the first use some of the Velcro pole straps don't work at all, simply failing to adhere. The tent is heavy and small for the weight, you really can only fit one backpack in the vestibule. Over 3 months of use now, maybe 30 nights, the stud button on the door zip cover has broken off. After all these negatives I can say the tent does perform well in the wind but poor design and manufacturing really let it down.

5 5

Love Eureka Tents

I've had my Timberline for years and the zipper just busted at the end of last season. I used this tent at least a 100 times in extreme weather (from 10 degrees to 100 degrees) never had a problem. I have seen some nasty storms in this tent and never leaked a drop. If it is a stary night I take the fly off and get a good breeze. Now I need another tent (have a Kelty but it just isn't a Eureka) and it definately will be a Eureka.

Does anyone have an opinion Eurekas current...

Does anyone have an opinion Eurekas current quality? The Alpenlite looks like the replacement for my circa 1977 Eureka Timberline 2man i just retired in 2010. Will this one live up to that longevity?

Responded on

Burl, I've had mine for about 2 years with many uses. I use a footprint from Eureka and I've had no problems. Keep it clean, use a footprint and I would expect a very long life!
Excellent build quality.

Responded on

I've had one for about two years as well. For a while it was my only tent, so I really rather abused it. Its still in amazing shape. Never used a footprint with it, either.

4 5

Bombproof, but heavy.

  • Familiarity: I've used it once or twice and have initial impressions

I've used this a couple times for winter camping now...I have not used it for 3 season camping, preferring to use my Hubba Hubba instead. The Eureka offers good ventilation, reasonably good insulation for a 4 season tent, and is incredibly durable under wind and snowfall. Waterproofing is good, although as with all things, do some seam waterproofing if you want it to live. I use a footprint with mine, and have had good luck thus far.

5 5

Best 4 Season Tent for the Money

I love this tent. I've had my Alpenlite for about 6 or 7 years now, and it's been camping with me many many times. Nothing has ripped, the zippers dont' get stuck, it doesn't leak, it's easy to set up,iIn my opinion it's the best tent you can buy for the money. I got it at Kittery trading post for about $140 back in '06 I think it was. It has stood up to rain, wind and snow no problem. Again easy to set up and it fits my 6' 3" body and my wife who is 5' 8" just fine. If you are hiking long distances you can find lighter tents for sure, but this is pretty light for a 4 season tent at around 7 pounds. And, if you are not hiking solo you can always split up tent and poles to distribute the load. If you want to take the extra time to set up all the guy lines to the rain fly, this thing is bomb proof. Get one if you can.

5 5

Best 4 Season Tent for the Money

I love this tent. I've had my Alpenlite for about 6 or 7 years now, and it's been camping with me many many times. Nothing has ripped, the zippers dont' get stuck, it doesn't leak, it's easy to set up,iIn my opinion it's the best tent you can buy for the money. I got it at Kittery trading post for about $140 back in '06 I think it was. It has stood up to rain, wind and snow no problem. Again easy to set up and it fits my 6' 3" body and my wife who is 5' 8" just fine. If you are hiking long distances you can find lighter tents for sure, but this is pretty light for a 4 season tent at around 7 pounds. And, if you are not hiking solo you can always split up tent and poles to distribute the load. If you want to take the extra time to set up all the guy lines to the rain fly, this thing is bomb proof. Get one if you can.

5 5

Best bang for the buck

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Great tent, especially for the price. I would comfortably compare this with big-name tents costing a good deal more. I use this as as a solo, for which it's not the lightest, but very sturdy and packs fairly small. About the best venting I've seen in any sturdy tent (better than most 3-4 convertibles) allows it to be comfortably used in almost any weather. I might not pick this as my first choice for a Denali summit attempt or summer on the Sahara, but it should work for pretty much anything else. The set up is unusual, but easy enough once you've done it once. The only downsides I can think of are that it has only one door/vestibule and is a little compact for two large people. 4.5 stars

Responded on

I used my 1978 Eureka Timberline all round Denali, at least up to 10,000 ft. I used it all over Alaska in all seasons for about 2 1/2 years with great results. So I am betting the Alpenite would be more than up to the task. I had a North Face at same time but my Eureka was my #1 go to tent,at least 80% of the time. I used it from 1978 until 2010

What is the foot print for this tent?

What is the foot print for this tent?

Responded on

what: its basically an expensive tarp that can prolong the life of your tent's floor when sleeping on abrasive or sharp surfaces...
where? backcountry.com doesnt carry it but there are sites that do...

Responded on

You can find them at Eureka!'s website, got golite.com, has a bunch of after market footprints

Responded on

Juan you can get some sturdy plastic (very heavy preferred), set up your tent, put it over the plastic and mark the plastic to fit your tent. You want the footprint about 1 1/2" to 2" smaller than your tent so the rain doesn't fall on to the tarp (footprint) and pool under your tent. Much cheaper than paying someone for pretty much the same thing.

5 5

Alpenlite 2XT

  • Gender: Male
  • Familiarity: I've put it through the wringer

Very easy set-up, perfect venting options. Mine weighs in at 7.7lbs, that's without footprint or extra stakes...I realize its a little heavier than some, but this thing is awesome in a storm when it really counts.

I know a 4 season seems exstream in the...

I know a 4 season seems exstream in the summer in most places, but I do live at 10,000 ft in the rockies. It will dip down to lower 30s in summer and sometimes below freezing in summer/ winter. Think its still ok for my contitions up here Thanks John

Best Answer Responded on

It depends on what you are using it for. Naturally it will be heavier so you will need to plan accordingly if you are backpacking. Normally they will not have the same amount of mesh and other materials that facilitate air flow and you will get more condensation on the inside as well. Just keep those ideas in mind when making your decision.

Responded on

This 4 season tent vents better than some of the other models. As Steve mentioned, this thing weighs almost 9 pounds so that is something to consider. I think it would work for you but there are compromises.

Responded on

I brought my Eureka! 4 season, this past summer, on a trip that seen over 85f for days on end. I just opened all the vents, and was more than comfortable. The only place I noticed it being an issue, was the vestibule, early in the morning, had a lot of condensation. But I was set up on grass, so that is to expected overnight.

5 5

the last ten you will ever need

WOW,if you want a two person&lt; four season tent. and money is a concern. then this is the only tent you need to look at and buy. i camp with the boy scouts year round and no matter what the weather i am in this tent. i just got back today. the weekend was cold, snow at night with freezing rain. and i could not have been happier. i had a north face tent and as long as you liked an indoor shower every morning in the tent, all was good. not with this little work horse. there are more vents to shake a stick at. and no matter how hot, how wet it gets out side, there is zero condensation build up. room for you and your gear. very tight for two tho. bottom line this is the last tent i will ever buy. i could not be happy.

I'm 6'4" (76") and my wife is 5'8". We...

I'm 6'4" (76") and my wife is 5'8". We both are thin so with is not an issue, but lenght could be with tent length of 78". Is this cutting it to close for comfort. If so, anyone know of a similar larger tent in this price range.

Responded on

the Mountain Hardwear Hammerhead 3 is a large and tall 3man with a similar configuration for a comparable price, although it is not technically speaking a 4season tent. the big agnes fly-creek ul2 is 90" long, less than one quarter of the weight, but a bit more expensive. it is also a 3 season tent. honestly, i think you will be kind of hard pressed to find a larger 4season tent in that price range, but the things i would look for in a 4season tent are not present on this Eureka Alpenlite 2XT anyway...

5 5

Eureka Alpenlite 2XT Tent 2-Person

If you had to buy one tent. this is it. is it heavy..hell yes. will it stand up to what ever the weather is... hell yes!!! With kids in the boy scouts we tent camp year round. and i wake warm, protected and happy. rain,snow or shine.
unlike my north face bivy that you wake up to a shower in your tent every morning. this tent has so many vents it is not funny. and they make all the difference. room wise, no problem. holds me, my gear and either an extra kid or fat lab dog.
so spend your money here. backcountry will take care of you and you will love there products.

shasta base camp 10500

shasta base camp 10500

used this tent as a base camp @ 10500 feet. It worked very well in cold temps and strong winds at night

5 5

great tent for the money

This tent has really worked well for me. Easy to set up. Poles go right in holes without any problems or a tight fit like some tents. There are 6 poles and all have a clear place. 2 long, 2 short, 1 spine, and 1 horizontal beam. This makes putting this tent together easy and not confusing. The tent has like 6 places to ventilate and condensation is not usually a problem for me. There are also plenty of pockets inside to store things. The best part about this tent is the fly. It is constructed very well and has NEVER.....EVER had a problem with any leaking or 2 much snow making it sag. It has spots for 8 guidelines. I have had it in 40mph+ winds and snow and it performed as advertised. Great tent for the money so far....thanks

great tent for the money

can't figure out if this is single or...

can't figure out if this is single or double-walled. I'm new to this so forgive me. Does tent+fly=double-wall? can't get anyone to answer me on the "chat help" deal. thanks in advance to anyone that can help me out.

Best Answer Responded on

Its a double walled tent. Yes, tent+fly=double-wall.

Responded on

no, a tent and fly toegether = tent and fly and not double wall. a true double wall has 2 layers of fabric sewn together at the edges at a min. sort of like a sleeping bag has an inner and outer shell. adding a fly means that you now have a tent with a fly.

Responded on

I'm with knanier on this one.

"By simple definition a double wall tent uses a rainfly over the tent, whereas a single wall tent does not." -about.com

"The term “double-wall” refers to tents which have a tent body supported by poles running
through sleeves or to clips, and a separate rain fly over the top of the pole structure." -Marmot

Responded on

I would like to know what tent jg is referring to for his "double wall" definition. I can't think of a single tent like to one he is describing.

Single wall example = Mountain Hardware EV3
Double wall example = any tent with a rain fly

Unanswered Question

What is the pole fit and quality like on...

What is the pole fit and quality like on this tent?

Is there a footprint available?